Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Nissan Leaf Hatch Elec 40kWh Acenta Auto PCH - Total £6011.66 (Deposit - £1,606.39 + £300 fee + 23 months at £178.49, 8k M pa) @ Yes Lease
2015° Expired

Nissan Leaf Hatch Elec 40kWh Acenta Auto PCH - Total £6011.66 (Deposit - £1,606.39 + £300 fee + 23 months at £178.49, 8k M pa) @ Yes Lease

£6,011.66Yes Lease Deals
386
Posted 7th Jan

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Sounds like an amazing deal for an electric car. Closest thing to the Hyundai Ioniq Electric deal that was on here a few months ago.

I'm currently paying roughly £20-30 per month in fuel (1,000 miles) and £0 in tax. Can probably get cheaper electricity rate from a cheaper supplier too. So you get to drive a ~£26k car for 2 years for £6k.

Even cheaper if you can do business hire.

WLTP Range: 168 miles Combined (242 miles City Driving)
0-60mph: 7.9 seconds
BHP: 150bhp
Motor output: 110kW
DC Charge rate: 50kW max (40 mins 10-80%)
AC Charge rate: 6.6kW max (6hr 30 mins)

Nissan's website with full spec

For those unsure about EVs, you can take an EV suitability test here elmodrive.com/que…re/
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zcaprd707/01/2020 00:41

Vat rebate on all the payments, and no benefit in kind?



You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is VAT registered.

And yes the car would be classed as an income if you pass it through as a personal expense paid for by a 3rd party (a company).

HMRC will have a table which will tell you your liability. If you want to put it through as a personal expense then you will have to declare it on a P46 I believe or a PD1 (not sure of the numbers & letters of the forms).

The way to do it would be to pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles, then 25p per mile after that. So if you did the 8k business mileage you could claim £3600 per year but this would have to cover everything. All wear & tear, fuel, insurance & tax & the lease itself etc.


Obviously you could actually cover all your finance costs IF you legitimately claim a genuine high business only mileage. You cannot claim 10,000 miles if the odometer says the vehicle has only traveled 5000 miles & whatever you do don't mug of HMRC with massive personal mileage on the side. They have calculators & big discrepancies stand out like a sore thumb. BUT you would incur extra expenses from the lease agreement for going over the 8K mileage per year.

However, if you personally do not have the money in your own bank because the money is in company accounts that the company owes you could do a loan from the company to yourself to do the initial purchase in your own name. So long as the loan is less that £5k. In this case you would get a loan from the company for the initial £2k.


That is the best I can explain it. I may have got some terminology, phasing & spelling wrong.
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
I've a 24kw leaf. Its been the cheapest car to run period inc a £500 shed.
I bought it for £11k 28 months ago, its now worth £9k. I spend £20pm on electricity but save £120 pm on fuel so give or take a few ££ its actually free
We have another car for long journeys so I get its not for everyone, but to work, gym, school, shops, 60 mile round trips you can't get any cheaper
Edited by: "cheeky_chops" 7th Jan
Mikeonfreeserve07/01/2020 07:49

I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 …I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 miles range for an hour's charge via a domestic 13 amp socket' is, frankly, ridiculous.As for ' the millions of charging points' that is pie in the sky and those that exist will very quickly have little queues of cars and you will be able to calculate that it will be 2.5 to 3 hours before you get your turn.Until it is quick and easy to recharge batteries as is is to slam in 50 litres of fuel, there will be huge resistance.This, in turn, will give a false sense of complacency to the early adopters of electric cars.As ever, I'm open to persuasion and interested to hear real life experience.


I have a leaf, never once charged via a standand plug, it would take too long. It's for emergencies only I would say. At home you can fully charge the whole thing with a 7kw wall charger in around 7 hours (overnighter). However this is only if you have driven 160 miles in 1 day and run it flat. I don't charge it everyday.

If you are out on the road though, the super chargers available at different locations can give you 80% charge in less than 30 mins.

Lots of free chargers around too, where I do my shopping I can charge for free, so I am essentially being paid to park.

Its not yet as quick as filling up with petrol you are correct, and no good if you are driving long distances. But for nipping round and commuting locally, perfect. Plus just driving an electric car is so relaxing, quiet and smooth. Don't think I will go back to an ICE. Tesla next for me!
I'm sure there's many a chap (or girl) who would go for this, me included, but it's difficult to warrant such a 2 year expense when compared to running an old banger.

They may be a tad more polluting, but what about the 67mph you can get from a 15 year old Diesel Vauxhall or some such?

As lease deals go, if you want a newbie, this is hot. But if you don't care about having a new car, then stick with an old bus. Green-wise you are not worse off.

Maybe we should all drive 1970's Morris Minors, hehee!
386 Comments
Are there any business perks on these?
zcaprd707/01/2020 00:32

Are there any business perks on these?


VAT rebate plus BIK tax is 0% from April onwards.
Met-Cast07/01/2020 00:33

VAT rebate plus BIK tax is 0% from April onwards.



Only if the company is VAT regd
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 00:35

Only if the company is VAT regd


Vat rebate on all the payments, and no benefit in kind?
zcaprd707/01/2020 00:41

Vat rebate on all the payments, and no benefit in kind?



You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is VAT registered.

And yes the car would be classed as an income if you pass it through as a personal expense paid for by a 3rd party (a company).

HMRC will have a table which will tell you your liability. If you want to put it through as a personal expense then you will have to declare it on a P46 I believe or a PD1 (not sure of the numbers & letters of the forms).

The way to do it would be to pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles, then 25p per mile after that. So if you did the 8k business mileage you could claim £3600 per year but this would have to cover everything. All wear & tear, fuel, insurance & tax & the lease itself etc.


Obviously you could actually cover all your finance costs IF you legitimately claim a genuine high business only mileage. You cannot claim 10,000 miles if the odometer says the vehicle has only traveled 5000 miles & whatever you do don't mug of HMRC with massive personal mileage on the side. They have calculators & big discrepancies stand out like a sore thumb. BUT you would incur extra expenses from the lease agreement for going over the 8K mileage per year.

However, if you personally do not have the money in your own bank because the money is in company accounts that the company owes you could do a loan from the company to yourself to do the initial purchase in your own name. So long as the loan is less that £5k. In this case you would get a loan from the company for the initial £2k.


That is the best I can explain it. I may have got some terminology, phasing & spelling wrong.
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 01:12

You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is …You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is VAT registered.And yes the car would be classed as an income if you pass it through as a personal expense paid for by a 3rd party (a company). HMRC will have a table which will tell you your liability. If you want to put it through as a personal expense then you will have to declare it on a P46 I believe or a PD1 (not sure). The way to do it would be to pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles, then 25p per mile after that. So if you did the 8k business mileage you could claim £3600 per year but this would have to cover everything. All wear & tear, fuel, insurance & tax & the lease itself etc.Obviously you could actually cover all your finance costs IF you legitimately claim a genuine high business only mileage. You cannot claim 10,000 miles if the odometer says the vehicle has only traveled 5000 miles & whatever you do don't mug of HMRC with massive personal mileage on the side. They have calculators & big discrepancies stand out like a sore thumb. BUT you would incur extra expenses from the lease agreement for going over the 8K mileage per year. However, if you personally do not have the money in your own bank because the money is in company accounts that the company owes you could do a loan from the company to yourself to do the initial purchase in your own name. So long as the loan is less that £5k. In this case you would get a loan from the company for the initial £2k.That is the best I can explain it. I may have got some terminology, phasing & spelling wrong.


Hi, thanks for the detailed explanation, fair enough, it's how I do things with my ICE car at the moment, I thought there might be juicier incentives for an eV...
I'm sure there's many a chap (or girl) who would go for this, me included, but it's difficult to warrant such a 2 year expense when compared to running an old banger.

They may be a tad more polluting, but what about the 67mph you can get from a 15 year old Diesel Vauxhall or some such?

As lease deals go, if you want a newbie, this is hot. But if you don't care about having a new car, then stick with an old bus. Green-wise you are not worse off.

Maybe we should all drive 1970's Morris Minors, hehee!
kalico07/01/2020 02:26

I'm sure there's many a chap (or girl) who would go for this, me included, …I'm sure there's many a chap (or girl) who would go for this, me included, but it's difficult to warrant such a 2 year expense when compared to running an old banger.They may be a tad more polluting, but what about the 67mph you can get from a 15 year old Diesel Vauxhall or some such?As lease deals go, if you want a newbie, this is hot. But if you don't care about having a new car, then stick with an old bus. Green-wise you are not worse off.Maybe we should all drive 1970's Morris Minors, hehee!


I tend to agree, I think keeping my 20 year old BMW on the road (expensing business mileage at 40ppm) is the best way economically and environmentally. I doubt one of these Leafs will last 20 years...I believe 57mph is the optimal speed though?
Edited by: "zcaprd7" 7th Jan
A great price for this car
1on407/01/2020 04:49

Comment deleted


How are you claiming 44p/m? HMRC rate is 4p/m for electric cars.
GAVINLEWISHUKD07/01/2020 05:31

How are you claiming 44p/m? HMRC rate is 4p/m for electric cars.



Not if you are using your own car. Its 45p per mile for the first 10000 miles per year then 25p per mile thereafter. Believe it or not if you own your own car & do a lot of genuine business miles then you can actually make money & have a brand new car every couple of years.

gov.uk/gov…ces
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 05:38

Not if you are using your own car. Its 45p per mile for the first 10000 …Not if you are using your own car. Its 45p per mile for the first 10000 miles per year then 25p per mile thereafter.https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rates-and-allowances-travel-mileage-and-fuel-allowances/travel-mileage-and-fuel-rates-and-allowances


Yes, I kind of read his post wrong. Thought it was a company car. It's actually his car that he is getting through a scheme at work.
GAVINLEWISHUKD07/01/2020 05:48

Yes, I kind of read his post wrong. Thought it was a company car. It's …Yes, I kind of read his post wrong. Thought it was a company car. It's actually his car that he is getting through a scheme at work.


Her post* but yes. As you say. I hope it works for us! My husband occasionally goes to Sheffield which is about 60miles each way for us and the egolf has a real world range of 125miles or so I am told. Not sure how that will work out but his problem, not mine!
GAVINLEWISHUKD07/01/2020 05:48

Yes, I kind of read his post wrong. Thought it was a company car. It's …Yes, I kind of read his post wrong. Thought it was a company car. It's actually his car that he is getting through a scheme at work.



This tax stuff is a bit weird. If the company you work for only wants to pay you 30p per mile for business mileage in your own vehicle you can then claim tax relief from the HMRC for the other 15p per mile. Making it 45p per mile tax free.

So if your employer pays you less than 45p per mile for using your own vehicle for work then you can get tax back from HMRC

gov.uk/tax…ork

HMRC are odd.
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
kalico07/01/2020 02:26

I'm sure there's many a chap (or girl) who would go for this, me included, …I'm sure there's many a chap (or girl) who would go for this, me included, but it's difficult to warrant such a 2 year expense when compared to running an old banger.They may be a tad more polluting, but what about the 67mph you can get from a 15 year old Diesel Vauxhall or some such?As lease deals go, if you want a newbie, this is hot. But if you don't care about having a new car, then stick with an old bus. Green-wise you are not worse off.Maybe we should all drive 1970's Morris Minors, hehee!


Which 15 year old Vauxhall does 67MPG? I tend to run old cars as our second car and my experience with Vauxhall's has not been great
nitro22807/01/2020 06:54

Which 15 year old Vauxhall does 67MPG? I tend to run old cars as our …Which 15 year old Vauxhall does 67MPG? I tend to run old cars as our second car and my experience with Vauxhall's has not been great



They did a 1.2 or 1.3 diesel Corsa that roughly did that.
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 05:58

This tax stuff is a bit weird. If the company you work for only wants to …This tax stuff is a bit weird. If the company you work for only wants to pay you 30p per mile for business mileage in your own vehicle you can then claim tax relief from the HMRC for the other 15p per mile. Making it 45p per mile tax free. So if your employer pays you less than 45p per mile for using your own vehicle for work then you can get tax back from HMRChttps://www.gov.uk/tax-relief-for-employees/vehicles-you-use-for-workHMRC are odd.


But it's not 45p tax free mileage in your example, is it? If you're in the 20% tax bracket you're only getting 30p + 3p (20% of the remaining 15p)?
1on407/01/2020 05:54

Her post* but yes. As you say. I hope it works for us! My husband …Her post* but yes. As you say. I hope it works for us! My husband occasionally goes to Sheffield which is about 60miles each way for us and the egolf has a real world range of 125miles or so I am told. Not sure how that will work out but his problem, not mine!


They could always find electricity at the other end. You can get something like 10 miles of range per hour out of a 13A household plug socket so unless they're going to Sheffield then immediately turning round it should be fine. You just need an extension cable and some ingenuity to take advantage of the millions of charge points in existence.
mcaf12307/01/2020 07:15

But it's not 45p tax free mileage in your example, is it? If you're in the …But it's not 45p tax free mileage in your example, is it? If you're in the 20% tax bracket you're only getting 30p + 3p (20% of the remaining 15p)?



You don't get taxed on personal mileage expenditure for business use. Regardless of your tax band. You are incorrect. I was going to PM you but what is the point. Please retract your comment.
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 07:17

You don't get taxed on personal mileage expenditure for business use. …You don't get taxed on personal mileage expenditure for business use. Regardless of your tax band. You are incorrect.


I know that, but if your company only pays you 30p per mile you don't get the full 15p difference between that and the 45p per mile from HMRC do you?
It's been a good few years since I filled out a P87 so I may be mistaken!
mcaf12307/01/2020 07:22

I know that, but if your company only pays you 30p per mile you don't get …I know that, but if your company only pays you 30p per mile you don't get the full 15p difference between that and the 45p per mile from HMRC do you? It's been a good few years since I filled out a P87 so I may be mistaken!


It comes off the bottom line not the top line .IE NOT TAXABLE
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
Does it come with home charging point installation?
I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 miles range for an hour's charge via a domestic 13 amp socket' is, frankly, ridiculous.

As for ' the millions of charging points' that is pie in the sky and those that exist will very quickly have little queues of cars and you will be able to calculate that it will be 2.5 to 3 hours before you get your turn.

Until it is quick and easy to recharge batteries as is is to slam in 50 litres of fuel, there will be huge resistance.

This, in turn, will give a false sense of complacency to the early adopters of electric cars.

As ever, I'm open to persuasion and interested to hear real life experience.
8k TV? I suppose you might get one in the back?
Mikeonfreeserve07/01/2020 07:49

I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 …I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 miles range for an hour's charge via a domestic 13 amp socket' is, frankly, ridiculous.As for ' the millions of charging points' that is pie in the sky and those that exist will very quickly have little queues of cars and you will be able to calculate that it will be 2.5 to 3 hours before you get your turn.Until it is quick and easy to recharge batteries as is is to slam in 50 litres of fuel, there will be huge resistance.This, in turn, will give a false sense of complacency to the early adopters of electric cars.As ever, I'm open to persuasion and interested to hear real life experience.


It's probably less than 10 miles per hour in winter. Also very dependent on weather and three way you drive. A cold battery will give you lower mileage as well. So ideal to drive there car as soon as it is of the charger. Heating also affects range.
Has anyone gone for this? These prices were on piston heads yesterday. But were deleted due to an error. Just thought I'd ask before voting hot. Fair play if this is a hukd special
CampGareth07/01/2020 07:15

They could always find electricity at the other end. You can get something …They could always find electricity at the other end. You can get something like 10 miles of range per hour out of a 13A household plug socket so unless they're going to Sheffield then immediately turning round it should be fine. You just need an extension cable and some ingenuity to take advantage of the millions of charge points in existence.


The person he visits lives in a terraced house (like lots of Sheffield!) so charging there won't be feasible. He'll have to go find a charging station somewhere and park up for half an hour. It's all feasible, just inconvenient as others have pointed out.
Edited by: "1on4" 7th Jan
I think its a good deal if you are in to electric car’s
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 01:12

pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage …pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles


How can you claim 45p/mile on a vehicle that you don't own?

I thought any expenses for a lease deal is claimed via the actual cost method and apportioning the business miles.
Has anybody contacted them to confirm it's live?
I posted about 3 deals for the Leaf yesterday and Mods pulled all of them because retailer didn't meet criteria (incl 360 leasing and CVL).

Anyway, i contacted a number of brokers who are showing similar overall total cost (most are 3+23 10k pa) and they said the deal was incorrect as the details provided by Nissan dealer weren't right.
darkh0rse07/01/2020 09:28

How can you claim 45p/mile on a vehicle that you don't own?I thought any …How can you claim 45p/mile on a vehicle that you don't own?I thought any expenses for a lease deal is claimed via the actual cost method and apportioning the business miles.



If you have your own personal vehicle & you chose to use it for business use you are entitled to claim the mileage as stated by HMRC. It doesn't matter whichever way you finance the vehicle. You could lease it, get a personal loan for it or buy one off of ebay for £500.

It doesn't matter

Say you do 10,000 miles business miles without payment from work you can add on £4500 onto your taxable allowance. If your employer pays you 30p per mile then you can add on £1500 onto your taxable allowance. If you run your own business that is £4500 that you can take out of your company with any tax implications if that vehicle is in your own personal name. .
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
I've a 24kw leaf. Its been the cheapest car to run period inc a £500 shed.
I bought it for £11k 28 months ago, its now worth £9k. I spend £20pm on electricity but save £120 pm on fuel so give or take a few ££ its actually free
We have another car for long journeys so I get its not for everyone, but to work, gym, school, shops, 60 mile round trips you can't get any cheaper
Edited by: "cheeky_chops" 7th Jan
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 01:12

You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is …You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is VAT registered.And yes the car would be classed as an income if you pass it through as a personal expense paid for by a 3rd party (a company). HMRC will have a table which will tell you your liability. If you want to put it through as a personal expense then you will have to declare it on a P46 I believe or a PD1 (not sure of the numbers & letters of the forms). The way to do it would be to pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles, then 25p per mile after that. So if you did the 8k business mileage you could claim £3600 per year but this would have to cover everything. All wear & tear, fuel, insurance & tax & the lease itself etc.Obviously you could actually cover all your finance costs IF you legitimately claim a genuine high business only mileage. You cannot claim 10,000 miles if the odometer says the vehicle has only traveled 5000 miles & whatever you do don't mug of HMRC with massive personal mileage on the side. They have calculators & big discrepancies stand out like a sore thumb. BUT you would incur extra expenses from the lease agreement for going over the 8K mileage per year. However, if you personally do not have the money in your own bank because the money is in company accounts that the company owes you could do a loan from the company to yourself to do the initial purchase in your own name. So long as the loan is less that £5k. In this case you would get a loan from the company for the initial £2k.That is the best I can explain it. I may have got some terminology, phasing & spelling wrong.


Fair play for taking the time to set it all out so clearly. Heat for the comment
Need 12k mileage so have sent them a message, but thanks OP this is a cracking deal
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 01:12

You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is …You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is VAT registered.And yes the car would be classed as an income if you pass it through as a personal expense paid for by a 3rd party (a company). HMRC will have a table which will tell you your liability. If you want to put it through as a personal expense then you will have to declare it on a P46 I believe or a PD1 (not sure of the numbers & letters of the forms). The way to do it would be to pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles, then 25p per mile after that. So if you did the 8k business mileage you could claim £3600 per year but this would have to cover everything. All wear & tear, fuel, insurance & tax & the lease itself etc.Obviously you could actually cover all your finance costs IF you legitimately claim a genuine high business only mileage. You cannot claim 10,000 miles if the odometer says the vehicle has only traveled 5000 miles & whatever you do don't mug of HMRC with massive personal mileage on the side. They have calculators & big discrepancies stand out like a sore thumb. BUT you would incur extra expenses from the lease agreement for going over the 8K mileage per year. However, if you personally do not have the money in your own bank because the money is in company accounts that the company owes you could do a loan from the company to yourself to do the initial purchase in your own name. So long as the loan is less that £5k. In this case you would get a loan from the company for the initial £2k.That is the best I can explain it. I may have got some terminology, phasing & spelling wrong.


P11D for future reference...
Mikeonfreeserve07/01/2020 07:49

I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 …I'm going to have to research this electric car malarkey because ' 10 miles range for an hour's charge via a domestic 13 amp socket' is, frankly, ridiculous.As for ' the millions of charging points' that is pie in the sky and those that exist will very quickly have little queues of cars and you will be able to calculate that it will be 2.5 to 3 hours before you get your turn.Until it is quick and easy to recharge batteries as is is to slam in 50 litres of fuel, there will be huge resistance.This, in turn, will give a false sense of complacency to the early adopters of electric cars.As ever, I'm open to persuasion and interested to hear real life experience.


I have a leaf, never once charged via a standand plug, it would take too long. It's for emergencies only I would say. At home you can fully charge the whole thing with a 7kw wall charger in around 7 hours (overnighter). However this is only if you have driven 160 miles in 1 day and run it flat. I don't charge it everyday.

If you are out on the road though, the super chargers available at different locations can give you 80% charge in less than 30 mins.

Lots of free chargers around too, where I do my shopping I can charge for free, so I am essentially being paid to park.

Its not yet as quick as filling up with petrol you are correct, and no good if you are driving long distances. But for nipping round and commuting locally, perfect. Plus just driving an electric car is so relaxing, quiet and smooth. Don't think I will go back to an ICE. Tesla next for me!
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 01:12

You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is …You cannot claim VAT back unless the company OR yourself as a trader is VAT registered.And yes the car would be classed as an income if you pass it through as a personal expense paid for by a 3rd party (a company). HMRC will have a table which will tell you your liability. If you want to put it through as a personal expense then you will have to declare it on a P46 I believe or a PD1 (not sure of the numbers & letters of the forms). The way to do it would be to pay for the finance as an individual & claim against it business mileage Allowance Payments you can get are 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles, then 25p per mile after that. So if you did the 8k business mileage you could claim £3600 per year but this would have to cover everything. All wear & tear, fuel, insurance & tax & the lease itself etc.Obviously you could actually cover all your finance costs IF you legitimately claim a genuine high business only mileage. You cannot claim 10,000 miles if the odometer says the vehicle has only traveled 5000 miles & whatever you do don't mug of HMRC with massive personal mileage on the side. They have calculators & big discrepancies stand out like a sore thumb. BUT you would incur extra expenses from the lease agreement for going over the 8K mileage per year. However, if you personally do not have the money in your own bank because the money is in company accounts that the company owes you could do a loan from the company to yourself to do the initial purchase in your own name. So long as the loan is less that £5k. In this case you would get a loan from the company for the initial £2k.That is the best I can explain it. I may have got some terminology, phasing & spelling wrong.


If you owned the company, you wouldn't put it through your company as a personal expense but as a business expense in providing you with a company car. The company would get tax relief on the lease payments and you'd pay income tax on the benefit in kind value of the car. As it is fully electric (zero emissions) and a range of over 130 miles the bik from 5.4.20 is £0 for next year, 1% of list price the following year and 2% in 22/23.
Edited by: "Grahamdue" 7th Jan
Grahamdue07/01/2020 11:10

If you owned the company, you wouldn't put it through your company as a …If you owned the company, you wouldn't put it through your company as a personal expense but as a business expense in providing you with a company car. The company would get tax relief on the lease payments and you'd pay income tax on the benefit in kind value of the car. As it is fully electric (zero emissions) and a range of over 130 miles the bik from 5.4.20 is £0 for next year, 1% of list price the following year and 2% in 22/23.


Benefit in kind P11D £29,790. An accountant would be better than me but by my reckoning you pay tax on that at standard rate.

Then on top of that your company is still paying the lease & fuel.


So I have researched the PAYE on the P11D. So it is another £960 in tax for 20% & £1920 for 40% per year plus your lease coming out of your business plus expenses. There also might be additional employer/es NI.
Edited by: "Willy_Wonka" 7th Jan
Willy_Wonka07/01/2020 05:58

This tax stuff is a bit weird. If the company you work for only wants to …This tax stuff is a bit weird. If the company you work for only wants to pay you 30p per mile for business mileage in your own vehicle you can then claim tax relief from the HMRC for the other 15p per mile. Making it 45p per mile tax free. So if your employer pays you less than 45p per mile for using your own vehicle for work then you can get tax back from HMRChttps://www.gov.uk/tax-relief-for-employees/vehicles-you-use-for-workHMRC are odd.


It's not weird. If you do, say, 5000 business miles per year and your company reimbursed you at 30ppm instead of 45ppm, then you have been under-reimbursed by £750 in the year. HMRC allow you to set off the under payment against your taxed income so that you get 20/40% of this back (depending on your tax rate). You don't get the full £750 back though - only the tax on £750.
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