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NordVPN 3 Year Studentbeans £1.89 per Month / 3 years contract
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NordVPN 3 Year Studentbeans £1.89 per Month / 3 years contract

£68.04£71.645%Student Beans Deals
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Posted 16th Aug

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3-year plan for £1.89/month
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Unlock 3-year plan for £1.89/month student discount at NordVPN with Student Beans.

Use our NordVPN student discount code at the checkout to enjoy 3-year plan for £1.89/month student discount.
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41 Comments
Great price for the 3 years and only $2.60 more than the lowest on Black Friday deals
If someone has a code please can I have it. Thanks
I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone elaborate and explain the benefits of having this? Thanks in advance :-)
What is a VPN?
A VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a service that lets you access the web safely and privately by routing your connection through a server and hiding your online actions.

But how does it exactly work?

How Does a VPN Work?

Here’s how a VPN works for you, the user. You start the VPN client (software) from your VPN service. This software encrypts your data, even before your Internet Service Provider or the coffee shop WiFi provider sees it. The data then goes to the VPN, and from the VPN server to your online destination — anything from your bank website to a video sharing website to a search engine. The online destination sees your data as coming from the VPN server and its location, and not from your computer and your location.

When you connect to the web without a VPN, here’s how your connection looks:

No VPN connection
Though it’s the standard, this sort of connection has some flaws. All of your data is out there in the open, and any interested party can peek at what you’re sending.

The internet is a collection of servers responsible for storing websites and serving them to anyone who wants to view them. Those servers talk with each other all the time, including sharing your data with each other to ultimately let you browse a page. Great for you to be able to surf, but not great for privacy.

Going online is like taking a commercial airline flight. The ticket agent, baggage handlers, security personnel, and flight attendants all need pieces of data to get you routed between cities. A similar exchange of information happens on the web.

If it’s just a fun website that you’re looking at then no need to worry. It doesn’t matter if someone sees your data. But if it’s online banking, business email, or anything else that’s a bit more sensitive — it’s a different story.

Now, here’s how the same connection looks with a VPN enabled:

With VPN
When you use a VPN service, your data is encrypted (because you’re using their app), goes in encrypted form to your ISP then to the VPN server. The VPN server is the third party that connects to the web on your behalf. This solves the privacy and security problem for us in a couple of ways:

The destination site sees the VPN server as the traffic origin, not you.
No one can (easily) identify you or your computer as the source of the data, nor what you’re doing (what websites you’re visiting, what data you’re transferring, etc.).
Your data is encrypted, so even if someone does look at what you’re sending, they only see encrypted information and not raw data.
As you would imagine, such a scenario is much safer than connecting to the web the traditional way. But how secure is it exactly? Let’s find out:

How Secure is a VPN?

How Secure is a VPN?VPN security causes debate among IT pros and others in the industry, and no two services are identical in their offerings or security. There are two main factors:

The limitations of the type of VPN technology used by a provider.
Legal and policy limitations affecting what can be done with that technology. The laws of the country where the server and the company providing the VPN are located and the company’s own policies affect how the company implements this technology in their service.
Let’s take a closer look at these factors.

VPN Protocols

VPN protocols define how the service handles data transmission over a VPN. The most common protocols are PPTP, L2TP, SSTP, IKEV2, and OpenVPN. Here’s a brief overview:

PPTP (Point-To-Point Tunneling Protocol). This is one of the oldest protocols in use, originally designed by Microsoft. Pros: works on old computers, is a part of the Windows operating system, and it’s easy to set up. Cons: by today’s standards, it’s barely secure. Avoid a provider if this is the only protocol offered.
L2TP/IPsec (Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol). This is a combination of PPTP and Cisco’s L2F protocol. The concept of this protocol is sound — it uses keys to establish a secure connection on each end of your data tunnel — but the execution isn’t very safe. The addition of the IPsec protocol improves security a bit, but there are reports of NSA’s alleged ability to break this protocol and see what’s being transmitted. No matter if those are actually true, the fact that there’s a debate at all is perhaps enough to avoid this as well.
SSTP (Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol). This is another Microsoft-built protocol. The connection is established with some SSL/TLS encryption (the de facto standard for web encryption these days). SSL’s and TLS’s strength is built on symmetric-key cryptography; a setup in which only the two parties involved in the transfer can decode the data within. Overall, SSTP is a very secure solution.
IKEv2 (Internet Key Exchange, Version 2). This is yet another Microsoft-built protocol. It’s an iteration of Microsoft’s previous protocols and a much more secure one at that. It provides you with some of the best security.
OpenVPN. This takes what’s best in the above protocols and does away with most of the flaws. It’s based on SSL/TLS and it’s an open source project, which means that it’s constantly being improved by hundreds of developers. It secures the connection by using keys that are known only by the two participating parties on either end of the transmission. Overall, it’s the most versatile and secure protocol out there.
Generally speaking, most VPNs allow you to select the protocol you use. The more secure protocol you connect through (OpenVPN, IKEv2), the more secure your whole session will be.

Unfortunately, not all devices will allow you to use all these protocols. Since most of them were built by Microsoft, you’ll be able to use them on all Windows PCs. For Apple devices, you will come across some limitations. For example, L2TP/IPsec is the default protocol for iPhone. And Android … well, Android has some problems of its own, which we’ll get to later on.

Encryption Basics

In brief, encryption works by:

Starting with plain data
Applying a key (secret code) to transform the data
Ending with encrypted data
The encrypted data is only readable by someone with the original key used to encrypt the data.

Modern encryption algorithms work on this principle, with the second step being very complex and worthy of doctoral- level research. What you need to look for is your data being encrypted with the AES algorithm of at least 128 bits. Many of the top VPNs out there go a step above that and offer AES-256 encryption, including NordVPN (review), Surfshark (review) and ExpressVPN (review).

Your VPN can be super secure, but it all comes down to the connection protocol the encryption mechanism used to handle your information.

Legal Constraints and Company Vision

(Note: None of this is legal advice. Read for entertainment purposes only.)

All good VPN companies will do everything they can to protect your data, your privacy, and your overall security on the web. Keep in mind that they’re still subject to the law in the jurisdiction they’re in, which can affect their service.

Depending on the local law of the country where the VPN was established, the company may be forced by court order to share whatever records they have regarding your activity — and there can be international agreements between countries to share information in these cases. If you do enough research, you may find a VPN established in a country that doesn’t have any such agreements in place with your country.

So in the end, you are only secure with a VPN if it’s not only willing and technically capable of keeping your information safe and private, but also if it’s legally allowed to do it. Let’s tackle this topic a bit more broadly and focus on answering the general question:

Is it Legal to Use a VPN?

Is a VPN legal?In a word, yes. But not always.

First off, VPN as a concept is somewhat new in “legal years,” so not all jurisdictions have managed to keep up. This means that the rules are murky and can be interpreted in many ways.

In overall, VPNs seem to be okay to use in most countries, especially in the US, Canada, the UK, the rest of Western Europe. (Important! What matters here is your physical location when using the VPN.)

Generally, VPNs are often not okay in China, Turkey, Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Belarus, Oman, Russia, Iran, North Korea, and Turkmenistan.

To learn more about the legality of VPN in your country, find the laws of your local government, and review this in-depth resource of ours answering if a VPN is legal in your country — we go through over 190 countries and tell you what’s up.

Does a VPN Make Me Fully Anonymous Online?

Does a VPN Make You Anonymous?In a word, no. But the extent to which it does is still impressive.

Without a VPN, your connection is fully open, and your ISP, the cafe WiFi router, any server along the way, or a person with the right tools can look at your data. Using a VPN solves many of those problems by encrypting your transmission and making it appear as if it’s the server itself that’s making the connection and not you.

Investigate the following to help determine the extent of your anonymity.

Does the service keep logs?
The jurisdiction under which the VPN is established. In some cases, they might be legally forced to keep records. What happens when a government comes asking questions?
Does the service keep payment records? Do those records include identifying information?
Is there sufficient encryption and a secure connection protocol?
Not every VPN will protect you the same. If you make your choice wisely, you can address the concerns described above. Here’s our comparison of the top VPNs in the market to help you out.

VPN Logging Policies

VPN Logging PolicyThe logs a VPN keeps significantly affects the level of anonymity and privacy you have with their service. The logs a provider may keep include:

user activity
IP addresses
connection/disconnection timestamps
devices used
payment logs
Any such logs make you a tiny bit less anonymous since your IP can be connected to a given browsing session that you had. Of course, tying this to you personally is very difficult but still kind of doable if some agency is deliberate enough.

Overall, the fewer logs your provider keeps the better, with “no logs” the ideal.

Be careful. Many services state you have privacy on their sales material, but you need to look at their privacy policy to see their fine print and what data they actually keep, or they will state that their country does not require data retention yet they do not state their own data retention policy.

We’ve done the research for you. Here’s our big roundup of over 100 VPNs and their logging policy. Check it out when picking your service.

Free VPN versus Paid VPN

Free VPN versus Paid VPNRunning a good VPN service costs serious money — robust servers, data transfer, infrastructure, employees, and so on. If the service is offered for free, consider what compromises may have been made. Are they logging activity for their own reasons? Are they displaying their own ads? Is your data being sold to a third party?

Paying for a VPN isn’t a huge investment. We’ve tested some great solutions for as little as $3-5 per month, which doesn’t seem a lot in exchange for peace of mind and improved online privacy.
cpandk16/08/2019 16:50

I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone …I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone elaborate and explain the benefits of having this? Thanks in advance :-)


Or : cloudwards.net/wha…pn/
cpandk16/08/2019 16:50

I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone …I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone elaborate and explain the benefits of having this? Thanks in advance :-)


In simple terms it masks your device's IP address and therefore it masks where you and who you are in the world. You can choose via the VPN where in the world your device appears to be.

This is useful as a security measures against virtual threats whilst surfing the internet from hackers trying to steal passwords/personal info (especially if you're using public Wi-Fi), the government or any other types of data information gatherers.

Its also useful because you can take advantage of region-locked websites by pretending to be in that country. Some VPNs work on Netflix so you can access the contents of other countries.

Also if you are downloading/streaming often a VPN will mask the origin (you) of the download, useful for watching legally questionable apps and torrents.

There are other benefits but anonymity security are the main ones. Some VPNs are better than others. Some record logs, some don't, some throttle internet speeds when in use more than others, some offer more countries to pretend to be in, some have more generaous dpwnload limits and so on

Try a free trial of a VPN first to get a feel for it. Windscribe sometimes have a 50GB free version, keep an eye out for that deal when it comes.
Anyone have a spare code they could pm me?
not the best experience using with a chromebook. need to keep rebooting to reconnect. nordvpn did send me a apk file to sideload, but i'm not messing around with the operating system.
This good for streaming services? Spotify, Netflix etc.
Surely better to go through quidco or tcb for a better deal? They are currently offering 60% cashback?
Edited by: "vij_chauhan" 16th Aug
Wait is this monthly or one off payment?
Quidco have 60% cashback at the moment.
spiersy8816/08/2019 17:20

Anyone have a spare code they could pm me?

SBextra1mo1VEUpXuuEe
cpandk16/08/2019 16:50

I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone …I've heard of VPN and kind of understand the basics but can anyone elaborate and explain the benefits of having this? Thanks in advance :-)


VPN means Virtual Private Network it used to mean connecting networks together via a larger network so for example LANs to WANs and back to LANs. Now people use it to try and give themselves some privacy online. However some VPN providers have been known to give up the browsing data if required by law enforcement. If you are interested in privacy and you should be, even if you're doing nothing wrong, then visit r/privacy on Reddit for more info.

You have zero privacy if you have a smartphone, browse the Internet without a VPN and even then you need to take things further, go on Google Maps for example if you have an Android phone and look at Timeline it'll show every journey you've done, logged by day. Every service that offers a smart microphone, which is Amazon Alexa, Microsoft Cortana, Google at al and even Skype conversations have all been transcribed or listened to by third parties. You may think you have nothing to hide but you most certainly do. We've all walked right in to a real privacy nightmare happening right now because we want convenience.
Anyone wants free vpn for your phone use 'touchvpn' its free
Does anyone have a code going spare please?
N1Andy16/08/2019 18:50

Quidco have 60% cashback at the moment.


I got student and Quidco to both work
Could someone pls pm a spare code? Thanks
This gets around Netflix regional restrictions, right?
I have a NordVPN but wouldn’t recommend it if you’re concerned about privacy as they are so secretive about their ownership.

The below is a recent review of privacy focussed transparent VPN companies, in particular see the section further down the article titled “The Research” as that covers a lot of the issues around VPNs and includes interviews with some of the best people in the industry.
thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-vpn-service/
Edited by: "patrick_000" 17th Aug
Quidco showing as 70% cashback on my account
yep its 70% cash back @ quidco nice
patrick_00017/08/2019 03:04

I have a NordVPN but wouldn’t recommend it if you’re concerned about pri …I have a NordVPN but wouldn’t recommend it if you’re concerned about privacy as they are so secretive about their ownership.The below is a recent review of privacy focussed transparent VPN companies, in particular see the section further down the article titled “The Research” as that covers a lot of the issues around VPNs and includes interviews with some of the best people in the industry.thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-vpn-service/


Unless something changed with ownership at TunnelBear again I wouldn’t recommend them. When they got bought out a year or 2 back there was lots of complaints because they were then owned by a company in a 5 eyes country. This and some other stuff made people very wary of using them for good reason and Youtubers stopped sponsoring them as well. Therefore I don’t have much stock in a Wirecutter article recommending them when that whole article is probably an attempt to get money through affiliation deals.

NordVPN is one of the most trusted VPNs out there and it does have from my experience the best speeds that are reliable. When looking at most sites that rank VPNs from a security perspective they normally are found in the top 3
Edited by: "Godrick" 17th Aug
Anyone know if this can be stacked beyond a current sub?
Edited by: "ricaird" 17th Aug
ricaird17/08/2019 07:57

Anyone know if this can be stacked beyond a current sub?


Looks like it can but you won't be eligible for 70% cashback. Nord cashback is reliable in my experience.
SBextra1mooEN7De2R1o for anyone who wants it
patrick_00017/08/2019 03:04

I have a NordVPN but wouldn’t recommend it if you’re concerned about pri …I have a NordVPN but wouldn’t recommend it if you’re concerned about privacy as they are so secretive about their ownership.The below is a recent review of privacy focussed transparent VPN companies, in particular see the section further down the article titled “The Research” as that covers a lot of the issues around VPNs and includes interviews with some of the best people in the industry.thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-vpn-service/


Thats a paid add for th New York Times. Look here for an unbiased review
Anyone know if you get cashback if you've not signed up to pay the 20% VAT?
vij_chauhan17/08/2019 14:36

Anyone know if you get cashback if you've not signed up to pay the 20% VAT?



Yes you do.
It seems like 70% quidco is working. Not sure how to update the deal but perhaps adding it to the description might be useful..
Why would you pay vpn when there are free ones available?
Is the 70% quidco cashback on top of 3 yr £83 deal?
yes but if you go with the UK vat setting it's more than £83
Anyone with a code to PM me please?
PM Me as well rather than posting here which gets taken by public 😬
After using Nord VPN for over a year I can say I’m not a fan of it... connection is constantly dropping, so I need to manually reconnect to another server which is very annoying
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