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NutriPreme Vitamin D High Strength 5000 IU £4.97 (Prime) Sold by NutriPreme and Fulfilled by Amazon.
NutriPreme Vitamin D High Strength 5000 IU £4.97 (Prime) Sold by NutriPreme and Fulfilled by Amazon.

NutriPreme Vitamin D High Strength 5000 IU £4.97 (Prime) Sold by NutriPreme and Fulfilled by Amazon.

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NutriPreme Vitamin D High Strength 5000 IU (1 Year Supply) Vitamin D3 Tablets - ★ 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE - Love them or they're FREE! ★ BUY 2 GET FREE UK DELIVERY! Benefits Immune System, Helps Strengthen Bones and Teeth - UK Produced - 100% Vegetarian Dairy and Gluten Free.

Price Down to: £4.97

Stock up for this Year!

This is not Dodgy, the price usually come this down only once or twice a year!

25 Comments

got TWO in basket but its not giving me free delivery !

cadmus

got TWO in basket but its not giving me free delivery !



​It does for me. Probably you are not a prime member?

Works for me. Thanks

Too cheap for whats aparrently in the bottle. Dodgy.

Thanks ordered needed some more D3

Deals on this are always coming up I bought the exact same on 1st March for £2.97 with free delivery

willllllllll

Too cheap for whats aparrently in the bottle. Dodgy.


Yeah was gunna say similar. If there are fake Tissot's, fake fragrances etc sold direct from Amazon. Wouldn't trust them with a health related product you cannot verify easily.

How many in a bottle? GoNutrition often sell 360 5000iu for £5

Showing £10.97 here.

5000 units a day..would only take this dose under consultant supervision.

Was going to say the same thing. That's five times the RDA, isn't it?

price is £10.47 and i have prime

sunnyhot

5000 units a day..would only take this dose under consultant supervision.



Agreed. Excess vitamins can strain your kidneys. Excess vitamin D can contribute to kidney stones.

About the RDA thing... I was thinking, if the tablet isn't incredibly tiny, I can break it into 2 which would make it approx 2500~ units a day, to avoid ODing somewhat. Maybe further break it into 2 again if the size allows it. Effectively if I play it right I got 4 years of Vitamin D out of this purchase.

Might expire by then, but just a thought.

Treatment of vitamin D deficiency in adults (1):

the following adult vitamin D thresholds are adopted by UK practitioners in respect to bone health:
serum vitamin D (serum 25OHD) 25OHD of 30-50 nmol/L may be inadequate in some people serum
25OHD > 50 nmol/L is sufficient for almost the whole population

treatment thresholds (1):
Serum 25OHD
Serum 25OHD 30-50 nmol/L: treatment is advised in patients with the following:
fragility fracture, documented osteoporosis or high fracture risk
treatment with antiresorptive medication for bone disease
symptoms suggestive of vitamin D deficiency
increased risk of developing vitamin D deficiency in the future because of reduced exposure to sunlight, religious/cultural dress code, dark skin, etc.
raised PTH
medication with antiepileptic drugs or oral glucocorticoids
conditions associated with malabsorption

serum 25OHD > 50 nmol/L: provide reassurance and give advice on maintaining adequate vitamin D levels through safe sunlight exposure and diet

oral vitamin D3 (colecalciferol) is the treatment of choice in vitamin D deficiency (1)

where rapid correction of vitamin D deficiency is required, such as in patients with symptomatic disease or about to start treatment with a potent antiresorptive agent (zoledronate or denosumab), the recommended treatment regimen is based on fixed loading doses followed by regular maintenance therapy:
a loading regimen to provide a total of approximately 300,000 IU vitamin D, given either as separate weekly or daily doses over 6 to 10 weeks
maintenance therapy comprising vitamin D in doses equivalent to 800-2000 IU daily (occasionally up to 4,000 IU daily), given either daily or intermittently at higher doses

1) Loading regimens for treatment of deficiency up to a total of approximately 300,000 IU given either as weekly or daily split doses. The exact regimen will depend on the local availability of vitamin D preparations but will include:

50,000 IU capsules, one given weekly for 6 weeks (300,000 IU)
20,000 IU capsules, two given weekly for 7 weeks (280,000 IU)
800 IU capsules, five a day given for 10 weeks (280,000 IU)

the following should be borne in mind:
supplements should be taken with food to aid absorption
calcium/vitamin D combinations should not be used as sources of vitamin D for the above regimens, given the resulting high dosing of calcium
2) Maintenance regimens may be considered 1 month after loading with doses equivalent to 800 to 2000 IU daily (occasionally up to 4,000 IU daily), given either daily or intermittently at a higher equivalent dose.


Notes:

dose conversion (2):
the dose of vitamin D in micrograms can be calculated by dividing the number of international units by 40. Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (colecalciferol) are considered equal in potency
although there are suggestions that the onset of action of vitamin D3 is quicker

calcium and vitamin D combined supplements are not routinely indicated in patients with low vitamin D3 levels unless the patient also has hypocalcaemia. The calcium component may be unnecessary and can reduce compliance due to unpalatability. Serum calcium levels should, however, be monitored

short acting potent analogues of vitamin D such as alfacalcidol or calcitriol should NOT be used in this situation because there is no evidence to support efficacy and it can lead to hypercalcaemia

WARNING: NUT/SOYA ALLERGIES
vitamin D preparations such dekristol and Fultium D3 contain peanut oil; Drisdol, Calceos and Adcal D3 contain soybean oil. For full details of excipients, refer to individual SPCs
all patients receiving pharmacological doses of vitamin D should have the plasma-calcium concentration checked at intervals (initially weekly) and whenever nausea or vomiting are present (3)
serum calcium concentrations should be checked regularly for a few weeks after starting treatment for vitamin D deficiency; then vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium concentrations should be checked after 3-4 months of treatment to assess efficacy and adherence to therapy
after this check at 3-4 months then vitamin D and calcium concentrations should be checked every 6-12 months
breast milk from women taking pharmacological doses of vitamin D may cause hypercalcaemia if given to an infant (3)

vitamin D supplementation is contraindicated in patients with hypercalcaemia or metastatic calcification
relative contraindications include primary hyperparathyroidism, renal stones and severe hypercalciuria
patients with mild to moderate renal failure or known to have mild hypercalciuria should be supervised carefully when taking vitamin D In patients with a history of renal stones, urinary calcium excretion should be measured to exclude hypercalciuria, a problem which requires specialist referral

assessment of improvement in vitamin D (25OHD) status on replacement therapy (1)
routine monitoring of serum 25OHD is generally unnecessary but may be appropriate in patients with symptomatic vitamin D deficiency or malabsorption and where poor compliance with medication is suspected.
there is considerable variability between the results of studies examining the dose response to vitamin D supplementation, but it appears that much of this inconsistency results from the confounding effects of UV exposure in the summer months. When consideration is confined to the results of studies that examined the effect of supplementation on winter 25OHD levels, the results are more consistent:
a daily supplement of 20 to 25 µg (800 to 1000 IU) calciferol will cause an increase in 25OHD of 24 to 29 nmol/L. Most of these studies have suggested that a new steady-state 25OHD level is reached by about 3 months and possibly not until 6 months.
"..accordingly, it is a waste of resources to measure vitamin D levels too soon after the therapy has started. A minimum of 3 months treatment must be given and it may be more prudent to wait until 6 months have passed..."(1)

local guidance (5) has stated that "...only those patients with risk factors and signs and symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency should have their levels checked..". Other guidance suggests that (1):
serum vitamin D measurement is recommended for:
patients with bone diseases that may be improved with vitamin D treatment patients with bone diseases, prior to specific treatment where correcting vitamin D deficiency is appropriate patients with musculoskeletal symptoms that could be attributed to vitamin D deficiency

specialist supervision in vitamin D supplementation (1)
if a patient has tuberculosis or sarcoidosis
patients with granulomatous disease are at risk of hypercalcaemia because of increased 1alpha-hydroxylase activity (which converts 25OHD to active 1,25(OH)2D). Toxicity has been reported during vitamin D treatment of tuberculosis and in patients with active sarcoidosis.specialist advice should be sought before starting these patients on vitamin D therapy
there may be sub-groups of patients identified who are unable to maintain adequate vitamin D status. These may require a more aggressive replacement or maintenance schedule provided under specialist supervision in a secondary-care setting
local guidance suggests seeking specialist advice eGFR 0ml/min, pregnancy, hyperparathyroidism (5)

recommended daily intake of vitamin D in the UK is around 400IU (10mcg) for an adult, 280IU (7mcg) for children aged 6 months to 3 years and 340IU (8.5mcg) per day for infants under 6 months (6)
Reference

(1) National Osteoporosis Society (2013). Vitamin D and Bone Health: A Practical Clinical Guideline for Patient Management
(2) NHS Coventry and Warwickshire. Brief Prescribing guide - Treatment of Vitamin D Deficiency in Adults (February 2012)
(3) Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 2006; 44(4):26-9.
(4) BNF 9.6.4
(5) NHS Coventry and Warwickshire Area Prescribing Committee (May 2013). Vitamin D supplementation.
(6) nelm.nhs.uk/en/…cy/?query=vitamin+D&rank=1
(7)BNF 9.6.4

Expired me thinks as price above £10

many of us in the uk are deficient, but there is a lot of conflicting advice about dose. from reading around this, 5000iu is probably too high for daily use for most people, but if it was known to be risky they wouldn't be allowed to sell it.

haslitt

many of us in the uk are deficient, but there is a lot of conflicting … many of us in the uk are deficient, but there is a lot of conflicting advice about dose. from reading around this, 5000iu is probably too high for daily use for most people, but if it was known to be risky they wouldn't be allowed to sell it.



There aren't enough studies to prove whether it is risky. Doesn't mean that by virtue of something being on sale, that it's ok to take daily. You can also buy 10,000iu by the way.

sunnyhot

5000 units a day..would only take this dose under consultant supervision.


I've been taking this amount for over a year and my serum D level is still 76.4 (minimum is 80), doctors have no answer so wouldn't get to hung up about RDA - but best to get a full blood count first before taking any vitamins minerals e.t.c.


Edited by: "Jaybeam" 20th Mar

NHS says - 'everyone over the age of five years (including pregnant and breastfeeding women) is advised to consider taking a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin D.'

From google -
1 IU of vitamin D is the biological equivalent of 0.025 mcg cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol.
5000 IU = 125 mcg.
125 mcg = 0.125mg (1mg = 1000mcg)

We do have very dull days for most of the year and it's got worse over the years. Not having a proper summer any more doesn't help either. It is a logical assumption for anyone living in the UK to top up on their vitamin D a little at least, especially if you are not getting it from other sources (foods, holiday etc).

Jaybeam

I've been taking this amount for over a year and my serum D level is … I've been taking this amount for over a year and my serum D level is still 76.4 (minimum is 80), doctors have no answer so wouldn't get to hung up about RDA - but best to get a full blood count first before taking any vitamins minerals e.t.c.


Above 50 is adequate so I wouldn't get hung up about your Vit D being 76.

Sunni

Above 50 is adequate so I wouldn't get hung up about your Vit D being 76.


I'm not but it was less than that before I started taking the supplement. I'm an asthmatic and there is a correlation between low D levels and how Asthmatics respond to medication. That was the reason I first started taking D3.
Edited by: "Jaybeam" 20th Mar

Gone up to £11.47 now already

Jaybeam

I've been taking this amount for over a year and my serum D level is … I've been taking this amount for over a year and my serum D level is still 76.4 (minimum is 80), doctors have no answer so wouldn't get to hung up about RDA - but best to get a full blood count first before taking any vitamins minerals e.t.c.


Could be that since this product does not have a UK license it is a dud. Something to consider

sunnyhot

Could be that since this product does not have a UK license it is a dud. … Could be that since this product does not have a UK license it is a dud. Something to consider


Didnt use the make - used innopure which is supposed to be a high quality uk manufacturer!
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