Dept of Education - Oak National Academy Free Weekly lessons incl. Maths, English, Art and languages & Others. - Reception to Year 10
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Dept of Education - Oak National Academy Free Weekly lessons incl. Maths, English, Art and languages & Others. - Reception to Year 10

39
Expires on 01/09/2020Posted 21st Apr
Oak National Academy is the Gov'ts contribution. It has been built in under two weeks, through a collaboration of 40 state school teachers, plus organisations across the sector. Our aim is to support teachers to support their pupils.

They’ll cover a range of subjects including maths, English, art and languages. Teachers can use these resources to complement their own lesson planning and teaching until schools fully re-open. Every lesson will be free to use for every teacher and every pupil.

Oak National Academy was built at speed; at present our resources are for pupils who usually access their schools’ curriculum in mainstream education, from reception through to year 10, without significant support or adaptation. We’re currently working on providing support for teachers working with pupils with additional needs, and teachers based in specialist settings.
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Webcon1922/04/2020 04:06

It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a …It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a long way of a good teachers lesson. No differentiation, not even distinguishing between higher or foundation. Some short scribbly writing from a guy with his head cut off. Avoid. Terrible attempt.


I am a qualified teacher and education advisor. I haven't watched all of the lessons by any means, but I have watched a few and considering they were made in the teachers' homes with very few resources, I thought they were excellent. There was differentiation in the videos I watched (Reception): children were asked to label a picture with words, or for less able children, label the picture with the letter it started with. I understand they are currently creating SEN videos to provide further differentiation: it says these are coming. Having tested them on my 3 and 5 year old, I can confirm that they made progress in their learning and enjoyed it, and that is the only feature they need to be good in my book during these unprecedented times.
gidsterc21/04/2020 22:48

Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's …Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's appropriate in lessons sent to home-schoolers)?


I guess Parents now are teachers helping in their own kids development. Power to the Parents!
39 Comments
Very Helpful. Thank you.
Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's appropriate in lessons sent to home-schoolers)?
gidsterc21/04/2020 22:48

Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's …Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's appropriate in lessons sent to home-schoolers)?


I guess Parents now are teachers helping in their own kids development. Power to the Parents!
gidsterc21/04/2020 22:48

Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's …Seems to be aimed really at Teachers (for them to include what's appropriate in lessons sent to home-schoolers)?


You are right though but also parents can take a proactive approach in keeping their kids busy I suppose
Used this today, it’s actually not to bad and considering it’s free you really can’t go wrong
It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a long way off a good teachers lesson. No differentiation, not even distinguishing between higher or foundation. Some short scribbly writing from a guy with his head cut off. Avoid.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Webcon1922/04/2020 04:06

It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a …It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a long way of a good teachers lesson. No differentiation, not even distinguishing between higher or foundation. Some short scribbly writing from a guy with his head cut off. Avoid. Terrible attempt.


I am a qualified teacher and education advisor. I haven't watched all of the lessons by any means, but I have watched a few and considering they were made in the teachers' homes with very few resources, I thought they were excellent. There was differentiation in the videos I watched (Reception): children were asked to label a picture with words, or for less able children, label the picture with the letter it started with. I understand they are currently creating SEN videos to provide further differentiation: it says these are coming. Having tested them on my 3 and 5 year old, I can confirm that they made progress in their learning and enjoyed it, and that is the only feature they need to be good in my book during these unprecedented times.
Webcon1922/04/2020 04:06

It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a …It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a long way of a good teachers lesson. No differentiation, not even distinguishing between higher or foundation. Some short scribbly writing from a guy with his head cut off. Avoid. Terrible attempt.


Clearly you didnt read all of the details. It states they are not differentiated.
Well I think these are an excellent resource to supplement your child’s learning in these unprecedented times..... I’m one happy parent ! And my children will be using this resource to supplement the work they are receiving from school.
duckmuffin22/04/2020 04:26

I am a qualified teacher and education advisor. I haven't watched all of …I am a qualified teacher and education advisor. I haven't watched all of the lessons by any means, but I have watched a few and considering they were made in the teachers' homes with very few resources, I thought they were excellent. There was differentiation in the videos I watched (Reception): children were asked to label a picture with words, or for less able children, label the picture with the letter it started with. I understand they are currently creating SEN videos to provide further differentiation: it says these are coming. Having tested them on my 3 and 5 year old, I can confirm that they made progress in their learning and enjoyed it, and that is the only feature they need to be good in my book during these unprecedented times.


To be frank, it’s not hard to differentiate in a reception class. Teaching single expanding brackets to a Yr10, is way below the standard of a usual higher set and often y8 topic. (Of the two topics available).

Thanks for giving your qualifications. I am also a well qualified teacher.

I don’t think these teachers should be spending the time reinventing the wheel. An important job of a teacher, even a home teacher, is to give work at the correct level. So at least parents should be told if their children complete these, it will be mostly likely not the correct level and often way too simple for them.

This is at least weeks or months away from being a valuable resource. They have no system of feedback to improve it. You’re better off on YouTube where good videos are rated. This sort of site has been done better many, many times.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 23rd Apr
If I buy a box of Cornflakes, I cant give it the criticism that it doesnt contain Weetabix.
swoosh00722/04/2020 12:25

If I buy a box of Cornflakes, I cant give it the criticism that it doesnt …If I buy a box of Cornflakes, I cant give it the criticism that it doesnt contain Weetabix.


To use your analogy, not only am I restating it does not contain Weetabix, but I’m also questioning its usefulness as a breakfast cereal.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Webcon1922/04/2020 12:30

To use your analogy, not only am I restating it does not contain Weetabix, …To use your analogy, not only am I restating it does not contain Weetabix, but I’m also questioning its usefulness as a breakfast cereal.



I’m also questioning why teachers aren’t using Kellogg’s, instead of making All Bran in their Garage’s.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Webcon1922/04/2020 12:09

To be frank, it’s not hard to differentiate in a reception class. Teaching …To be frank, it’s not hard to differentiate in a reception class. Teaching single expanding brackets to a Yr10, is way below the standard of a usual higher set and often y8 topic. (Of the two topics available). Thanks for giving your qualifications. I am also well qualified teacher. I don’t think these teachers should be spending the time reinventing the wheel. An important job of a teacher, even a home teacher, is to give work at the correct level. So at least parents should be told if their children complete these, it will be mostly likely not the correct level and often way too simple for them. This is at least weeks or months away from being a valuable resource. They have no system of feedback to improve it. You’re better off on YouTube where good videos are rated. This sort of site has been done better many, many times.


Fortunately they have covered themselves here by explaining that the resources are for schools to make a decision about the appropriateness of them for their class and whether they wish to direct parents/children to it or not. Therefore, as you say, it is the teachers' job to give work at the correct level, but the job of the child's own teacher, who knows their own class, and not those at Oak Academy, who don't. I feel very fortunate that the teachers and all those involved in developing it have taken their time to do it, and also reassured that, unlike YouTube, it is safe throughout for my children and, in particular, is free of comments from the general public underneath the video,some of which may contain language that I would rather my children didn't see when we inadvertently scroll down (something which is added to 'live' so I would have no way of guaranteeing that my children don't see it, even though I am sitting with them and supervising them every second). I haven't listed my qualifications, just used them to help base my opinion upon, as well as my professional experience and that of a mother trying to home school in a difficult climate.
Edited by: "duckmuffin" 22nd Apr
duckmuffin22/04/2020 12:34

Fortunately they have covered themselves here by explaining that the …Fortunately they have covered themselves here by explaining that the resources are for schools to make a decision about the appropriateness of them for their class and whether they wish to direct parents/children to it or not. Therefore, as you say, it is the teachers' job to give work at the correct level, but the job of the child's own teacher, who knows their own class, and not those at Oak Academy, who don't. I feel very fortunate that the teachers and all those involved in developing it have taken their time to do it, and also reassured that, unlike YouTube, it is safe throughout for my children and, in particular, is free of comments from the general public underneath the video,some of which may contain language that I would rather my children didn't see when we inadvertently scroll down (something which is added to 'live' so I would have no way of guaranteeing that my children don't see it, even though I am sitting with them and supervising them every second). I haven't listed my qualifications, just used them to help base my opinion upon, as well as my professional experience and that of a mother trying to home school in a difficult climate.


Well if YouTube is not an option for you, then try TES, many resources there, as with many other topic specific options. Best results come when a teacher or mum chooses the resource based on the specification. Info given from school, like current and future topics.

I’ve seen many a lesson contain a YouTube video. These can be downloaded to avoid any issues.

I don’t get why you’d need an undifferentiated over simplified resource. Good sites take years to build up differentiated resources on single topics. Seems like a vanity project for someone to me.
Teachers should do this for their pupils based on their scheme of work. I get that. If it’s a template, then fine. If that’s the case, I hope they are providing access to the platform, and IT support, that’s more useful than the current content to schools.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
NCETM.org, or similar TES for those looking for resources.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Why did I do all that planning over Easter!?

Great resources! Every teacher/parent should be making use of this over lockdown! Heat!
Curlyman8322/04/2020 14:46

Why did I do all that planning over Easter!? Great resources! …Why did I do all that planning over Easter!? Great resources! Every teacher/parent should be making use of this over lockdown! Heat!


You not think it should be prefixed with this is not really what students are taught. In school. As it’s more complex? Maybe your teaching or school isn’t.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Curlyman8322/04/2020 14:48

Are you really arguing with yourself


I was adding an extra comment. It wasn’t a reply ✅
Curlyman8322/04/2020 14:46

Why did I do all that planning over Easter!? Great resources! …Why did I do all that planning over Easter!? Great resources! Every teacher/parent should be making use of this over lockdown! Heat!



Also, you did the planning so each one of your students are taught the correct levelled work. With tiers for those in higher sets. And help for those with different learning styles and abilities.
Webcon1922/04/2020 15:40

You not think it should be prefixed with this is not really what students …You not think it should be prefixed with this is not really what students are taught. In school. As it’s more complex? Maybe your teaching or school isn’t.


I think the word you’re looking for is prefaced.

Lots of excellent virtue signalling, here, but it’s been incredibly hard tailoring to students specific abilities, talents and difficulties. Anything that helps (as in this particular set of resources) is a welcome boon.
Webcon1922/04/2020 16:05

Also, you did the planning so each one of your students are taught the …Also, you did the planning so each one of your students are taught the correct levelled work. With tiers for those in higher sets. And help for those with different learning styles and abilities.


Oh, and by the way, “Learning Styles” are a myth. It’s just another fad that has been debunked as a waste of time and “potentially detrimental” to a child’s education.
Hopefully this whole experience will make us question our whole education system. Our son's Junior school and daughter's Secondary school have both been shambolic with the materials they are providing. Some links to materials from twinkle and their copy and pasted activities from elsewhere on the internet is pathetic. That's given the supposed time that teachers have put into lesson planning and preparation. Multiply that so-called 'preparation' by 10,000 schools and it is a giant, amateurish, ineffective waste of time.
Curlyman8322/04/2020 17:04

I think the word you’re looking for is prefaced.Lots of excellent virtue s …I think the word you’re looking for is prefaced.Lots of excellent virtue signalling, here, but it’s been incredibly hard tailoring to students specific abilities, talents and difficulties. Anything that helps (as in this particular set of resources) is a welcome boon.


No prefixed is fine.


Curlyman8322/04/2020 17:07

Oh, and by the way, “Learning Styles” are a myth. It’s just another fad tha …Oh, and by the way, “Learning Styles” are a myth. It’s just another fad that has been debunked as a waste of time and “potentially detrimental” to a child’s education.


Prefixed is more than fine, it illustrates the point. I’m not writing an essay here. Comes before. Not for me to be a pedant.

Learning styles in this context, are shorthand to any method used to engage pupils. Which if you don’t believe exist shouldn’t we all give up now and sit students in front of the TV.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Webcon1922/04/2020 19:16

No prefixed is fine. Prefixed is more than fine, it illustrates the point. …No prefixed is fine. Prefixed is more than fine, it illustrates the point. I’m not writing an essay here. Comes before. Not for me to be a pedant. Learning styles in this context, are shorthand to any method used to engage pupils. Which if you don’t believe exist shouldn’t we all give up now and sit students in front of the TV.


I think you’re in dreamland if you honestly believe that education will continue as normal at home, regardless of how detailed, well-planned and personalised your resources are. Giving students anything to develop their knowledge base is preferable to providing them with nothing. I’ve seen examples of people receiving random TES worksheets from their schools - these lessons and quizzes are far more beneficial, in my opinion.
I used this the last couple of days with my 10 and 7 year old and I know it doesnt replace proper teaching but for busy home working parents I found the lessons just about right time in length. The content is split by age and for primary I think it's 3 lessons a day and maybe 5 for secondary. They have mapped out the curriculum and you know what is being taught each week. Like I said it doesn't replace classroom teaching but I think it's not a bad substitute in this testing time. Recommended it to my school and they have allready posted in on Facebook and will include some it in the home learning packs.
Edited by: "Nath_RSW" 22nd Apr
Curlyman8322/04/2020 19:28

I think you’re in dreamland if you honestly believe that education will c …I think you’re in dreamland if you honestly believe that education will continue as normal at home, regardless of how detailed, well-planned and personalised your resources are. Giving students anything to develop their knowledge base is preferable to providing them with nothing. I’ve seen examples of people receiving random TES worksheets from their schools - these lessons and quizzes are far more beneficial, in my opinion.


I’ve also seen examples of pupils receiving worksheets with answers attached. The pupils have just copied answers for their weeks learning. Some teachers haven’t checked and there is currently no real follow up support at all.

If I see a “government website” though purporting to replace teaching. I’m going to critique it. If it’s work in progress then fine. It may be a get out for some slightly less conscientious teachers.

For any real learning, more for higher courses, it’s going to fall a long way short of a teacher and other established more differentiated sites. Brilliant.org although now very expensive, or Khan academy, etc are very finely tuned. More sites for individual courses Edexcel, Aqa etc. If you’re a teacher, I’d say you have an incentive to say what you add over a video and computer quiz.

If the site is a template, for a school to mirror, with their own content, as a goal, I’m for it. Many school already have these things. Some really don’t. High schools particularly.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 22nd Apr
Nath_RSW22/04/2020 19:37

I used this the last couple of days with my 10 and 7 year old and I know …I used this the last couple of days with my 10 and 7 year old and I know it doesnt replace proper teaching but for busy home working parents I found the lessons just about right time in length. The content is split by age and for primary I think it's 3 lessons a day and maybe 5 for secondary. They have mapped out the curriculum and you know what is being taught each week. Like I said it doesn't replace classroom teaching but I think it's not a bad substitute in this testing time. Recommended it to my school and they have allready posted in on Facebook and will include some it in the home learning packs.


I agree with this. I’d keep searching if you have the time. Download the course spec, or what you get from the school, work from there. If you can find the time!
Webcon1922/04/2020 19:46

I’ve also seen examples of pupils receiving worksheets with answers a …I’ve also seen examples of pupils receiving worksheets with answers attached. The pupils have just copied answers for their weeks learning. Some teachers haven’t checked and there is currently no real follow up support at all. If I see a “government website” though purporting to replace teaching. I’m going to critique it. If it’s work in progress then fine. It may be a get out for some slightly less conscientious teachers. For any real learning, more for higher courses, it’s going to fall a long way short of a teacher and other established more differentiated sites. Brilliant.org although now very expensive, or Khan academy, etc are very finely tuned. More sites for individual courses Edexcel, Aqa etc. If you’re a teacher, I’d say you have an incentive to say what you add over a video and computer quiz. If the site is a template, for a school to mirror, with their own content, as a goal, I’m for it. Many school already have these things. Some really don’t. High schools particularly.


I think you’re being rather harsh, there. It must’ve been rather difficult to launch all this within such a short time-frame. It was never going to be perfect - but it’s commendable that the government have got something so useful in place with such a quick turnaround.

I’ve had an absolute nightmare chasing students for work - maybe your students are more conscientious - and a fair proportion of parents simply couldn’t care less, as long as little Johnny isn’t bothering them.

For parents at home, I think this is a useful website - I’m not saying there aren’t alternatives out there, but this seems user-friendly and parents can jump in alongside their children. It’s not meant as a “replacement” for teachers - it’s there to compliment their practice, and if there are good examples to cherry-pick from then I’m alL for it.
Webcon1922/04/2020 04:06

It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a …It’s incredibly simplified. This is some way off other alternatives. And a long way off a good teachers lesson. No differentiation, not even distinguishing between higher or foundation. Some short scribbly writing from a guy with his head cut off. Avoid.



You are taking about Y7 maths, right? Description fits...
Curlyman8322/04/2020 20:23

I think you’re being rather harsh, there. It must’ve been rather difficult …I think you’re being rather harsh, there. It must’ve been rather difficult to launch all this within such a short time-frame. It was never going to be perfect - but it’s commendable that the government have got something so useful in place with such a quick turnaround.I’ve had an absolute nightmare chasing students for work - maybe your students are more conscientious - and a fair proportion of parents simply couldn’t care less, as long as little Johnny isn’t bothering them.For parents at home, I think this is a useful website - I’m not saying there aren’t alternatives out there, but this seems user-friendly and parents can jump in alongside their children. It’s not meant as a “replacement” for teachers - it’s there to compliment their practice, and if there are good examples to cherry-pick from then I’m alL for it.


It’s important to point out the differences. As a teacher you should always be quick to say why home schooling is going to fall short. Parents are going to struggle, teaching from home, in many cases.

Good experienced teachers use strategies to break up learning, and engage learners. As you know this is not just instruction (via video), it’s checking progress, checking understanding, feedback, structure, routines and more.

Khan academy (and others) etc aren’t perfect but provide some structure, feedback, progress, incentives. You must know low ability respond to colour, structure and many others visual, audio approaches (as does any ability). Badges, stickers, progress bars etc.

I get your eagerness to defend. But the wider picture is the just under half aren’t going to bother. They need an engaging system. And badly shot video, and single quiz unrelated to specification simply isn’t sufficient. Bite the bullet “government”, buy a tried and tested data driven platform. This is a sticking plaster and children deserve better. What is needed is engagement and attention to each pupil from each school and quality resources. This isn’t in the ballpark (yet). This is no slant on those who produced it. I’m sure if they pause and consider companies who spent years in development and testing, they’d concede they’ll be at a disadvantage for months if not years.

If huge statistical gaps appear in attainment in the coming years, please feel free and come back here and agree more should have been done. If this develops into valuable resource, I’ll welcome it. But parents should be weary, if your y10 is completing this, when they go to school they’ll be behind last years y10, unless you adhere to their specification and search out levelled resources. Remebering that they’ll be heading into y11 against private schools, that I know already have the best online support available.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 23rd Apr
gr8
Webcon1923/04/2020 02:25

It’s important to point out the differences. As a teacher you should a …It’s important to point out the differences. As a teacher you should always be quick to say why home schooling is going to fall short. Parents are going to struggle, teaching from home, in many cases. Good experienced teachers use strategies to break up learning, and engage learners. As you know this is not just instruction (via video), it’s checking progress, checking understanding, feedback, structure, routines and more. Khan academy (and others) etc aren’t perfect but provide some structure, feedback, progress, incentives. You must know low ability respond to colour, structure and many others visual, audio approaches (as does any ability). Badges, stickers, progress bars etc. I get your eagerness to defend. But the wider picture is the just under half aren’t going to bother. They need an engaging system. And badly shot video, and single quiz unrelated to specification simply isn’t sufficient. Bite the bullet “government”, buy a tried and tested data driven platform. This is a sticking plaster and children deserve better. What is needed is engagement and attention to each pupil from each school and quality resources. This isn’t in the ballpark (yet). This is no slant on those who produced it. I’m sure if they pause and consider companies who spent years in development and testing, they’d concede they’ll be at a disadvantage for months if not years. If huge statistical gaps appear in attainment in the coming years, please feel free and come back here and agree more should have been done. If this develops into valuable resource, I’ll welcome it. But parents should be weary, if your y10 is completing this, when they go to school they’ll be behind last years y10, unless you adhere to their specification and search out levelled resources. Remebering that they’ll be heading into y11 against private schools, that I know already have the best online support available.


You Lost Me After The Third Paragraph 😔
From reading comments here and elsewhere it seems that there is a huge difference between one school and another as to what they are providing their students with.

My 10 and 7 year old are being sent home fresh material, created by their teachers, every single day (via Google Classroom). It's a full jam-packed time table that we struggle to complete by 3pm each day. Maybe it's because I'm helping two different ages/levels and trying to keep a 3 year old entertained but I am finding it oh so much! My friend's daughters have merely been sent home a few worksheets copied and pasted from the internet to complete over the course of the week. I don't know what's worse, her scenario or mine

Anyway, deals like this are fab if you're looking for extra resource, voted hot op.
Not sure even I made it to the third paragraph. It was 2am 😃
Webcon1923/04/2020 18:44

Not sure even I made it to the third paragraph. It was 2am 😃


Brilliant haha
Hope the teachers involved have now moved away from this. And are now concentrating on robust plans for their schools social distancing. Hand washing on school entrance, staggered classes and breaks.

No more 40 students in a 10 square metre classroom. God send.
Edited by: "Webcon19" 8th May
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