OCZ Onyx 32GB £46.99 @ Dabs
292°Expired

OCZ Onyx 32GB £46.99 @ Dabs

64
Found 4th Jun 2011Made hot 6th Jun 2011
Entry SSD at a very competitive price. Supports TRIM.

64 Comments

Some will say it's too small, and it probably is, but regardless of that, this is an excellent deal. 2% Quidco too.

It's too small...

"It probably is"

Banned

2% quidco

To small, barely enough space for windows to be installed onto.

It is sufficient as a boot drive, as when Windows 7 installs on these the footprint is about 12 gb. Have just done a fresh install and put Nero, Eset AV and Macrium reflect backup and restore on and its only 13.9gb so more than enough!

it's slow SSD :
Internal Data Rate
125 MBps (read) / 70 MBps (write)

It's also only got a capacity for 15000 IOPS, compaired to some more modern SDD drives which manage 50,000 - 100,000.

The bulk of your operating system's work is done in 4kb chunks, so this IOPS (Input/Output Operations Per Second) becomes more crucial than the fairy tale maximum throughput rate.

In some circumstances lowend SSD drives have been found to be slower at actual tasks than straight up hard drives, which may only have a maximum transfer rate of 50ish MB/s.

If you're hoping to buy this for a performance boost, you may shave a few seconds off of the boot time, but nothing like the speed difference you'd get if you upped your money and got a 64gb Vertex 2 for about the £90 mark, capable of 50,000 IOPS.

Where this drive would be useful is in a laptop/notebook that would benifit from the power saving and no noise emmission, you may also see a slight improvement over say a 5400rpm laptop drive, but with 500gb 2.5 inch drives now below £40, you'd have to really want to sacrafice that kind of on the go storage of files.

Voted hot for the price, but just wanted to put in my tuppence

I've asked why SSD before and been told it was for the operating system, or select, mostly accessed, little written programs. So here is the cheapest yet. If I could turn writing off completely I'd prolly buy it, but Windows 7 knows best, which is more than me at the moment.

I use an 8GB SSD with WinXP on a netbook. Fantastic.

Highlights of the OCZ Technology 32GB Onyx SATA II 125R 70W (OCZSSD2-1ONX32G)

64MB onboard cache
TRIM support
Slim 2.5" design
RAID support


Summary

OCZ Onyx Series solid state drive - 32 GB - SATA-300

Solid state drive - internal

2.5" x 1/8H

Dimensions 6.9 cm x 9.9 cm x 9.3 mm

Weight 77 g

Capacity 32 GB

Interface Type Serial ATA-300

Average Seek Time 0.1 ms

Buffer Size 64 MB

Manufacturer Warranty 3 years warranty


Features Multi-level cell (MLC) flash

Internal Data Rate 125 MBps (read) / 70 MBps (write)

Seek Time 0.1 ms (average)

MTBF 1,500,000 hour(s)

Interfaces 1 x Serial ATA-300 - 7 pin Serial ATA

Compatible Bays 1 x internal - 2.5" x 1/8H

Service & Support 3 years warranty

Service & Support Details Limited warranty - 3 years , Technical support

Original Poster

Darkle

It's also only got a capacity for 15000 IOPS, compaired to some more … It's also only got a capacity for 15000 IOPS, compaired to some more modern SDD drives which manage 50,000 - 100,000.The bulk of your operating system's work is done in 4kb chunks, so this IOPS (Input/Output Operations Per Second) becomes more crucial than the fairy tale maximum throughput rate.In some circumstances lowend SSD drives have been found to be slower at actual tasks than straight up hard drives, which may only have a maximum transfer rate of 50ish MB/s. If you're hoping to buy this for a performance boost, you may shave a few seconds off of the boot time, but nothing like the speed difference you'd get if you upped your money and got a 64gb Vertex 2 for about the £90 mark, capable of 50,000 IOPS.Where this drive would be useful is in a laptop/notebook that would benifit from the power saving and no noise emmission, you may also see a slight improvement over say a 5400rpm laptop drive, but with 500gb 2.5 inch drives now below £40, you'd have to really want to sacrafice that kind of on the go storage of files.Voted hot for the price, but just wanted to put in my tuppence



I think you are misinformed about some important facts about SSD's.
Firstly random reads/writes (the "4k chunks" you mention). Can you show me a hard drive that gets even close to an ssd? Do you know how the IOPS of the fastest hard drive you can find?
http://img34.imageshack.us/img34/9291/23144.png

Power consumption is almost the same so you don't gain much. In fact some of the SSD's consume more power than a 5400rpm disk.

I can tell you that while people will not notice a difference when comparing different ssd's, they can tell straight away when it has been replaced with a hard disk. Don;t need benchmarks ;-)

Finally due to the small capacity this drive is better suited as a boot drive in a desktop system and not a laptop where the additional capacity of a 60+GB drive makes more sense.
Edited by: "osx" 5th Jun 2011

polly69

To small, barely enough space for windows to be installed onto.


No, you're completely wrong!
We've got W7 Pro installed and it uses less than 10GB of disk.
Edited by: "pete_l" 5th Jun 2011

zaphodbb

Highlights of the OCZ Technology 32GB Onyx SATA II 125R 70W … Highlights of the OCZ Technology 32GB Onyx SATA II 125R 70W (OCZSSD2-1ONX32G)Average Seek Time 0.1 ms64MB onboard cache



First I've ever heard of an SSD carrying a cache or a seek time. The point of an SSD is to be one big gigantic cache, and since there are no moving parts, there is not seek time latency. The only equivalent would be IOPS, which isn't on the description.

But then we are talking about Dabs here.

ShaunnyBwoy

First I've ever heard of an SSD carrying a cache or a seek time. The … First I've ever heard of an SSD carrying a cache or a seek time. The point of an SSD is to be one big gigantic cache, and since there are no moving parts, there is not seek time latency. The only equivalent would be IOPS, which isn't on the description.But then we are talking about Dabs here.



Maybe look more closely. I don't think I've ever seen one without both of these.
This (or any disk) would be significantly slower without caching. And the seek time is one of the most important facts in a drive spec., although as the industry only reports seek times in milliseconds and to one decimal place, by and large most SSDs will usually show as 0.1ms.

Original Poster

There is ALWAYS a seek latency.

On mechanical disks, if you're jumping around randomly reading, the best "iops" you can expect is about 150. This Onyx may "only" manage 15,000 rather than 50,000 but that is still a hundred times faster.

Windows goes to some effort to lay out its filesytem so that on booting it won't need to randomly skip about - that is what "defragging" is all about, and it mostly happens transparently in the background nowadays. It's nowhere near perfect, so you do still gain a significant speed up from SSD both in seek times and pure bandwidth.

For upgrading a netbook, if you want a reasonable capacity as well as speed, probably better to spend £67 on a Seagate Momentus XT 250GB "Hybrid". The Onyx may be OK as cheap boot-only second drive in a desktop, but the slow-ish write speed (and Windows does a hell of a lot of writes, all the time) makes it dubious for the only drive in the system.

scan.co.uk/pro…ncq

Your text here
southeastshopper

On mechanical disks, if you're jumping around randomly reading, the best … On mechanical disks, if you're jumping around randomly reading, the best "iops" you can expect is about 150. This Onyx may "only" manage 15,000 rather than 50,000 but that is still a hundred times faster. Windows goes to some effort to lay out its filesytem so that on booting it won't need to randomly skip about - that is what "defragging" is all about, and it mostly happens transparently in the background nowadays. It's nowhere near perfect, so you do still gain a significant speed up from SSD both in seek times and pure bandwidth.For upgrading a netbook, if you want a reasonable capacity as well as speed, probably better to spend £67 on a Seagate Momentus XT 250GB "Hybrid". The Onyx may be OK as cheap boot-only second drive in a desktop, but the slow-ish write speed (and Windows does a hell of a lot of writes, all the time) makes it dubious for the only drive in the system.http://www.scan.co.uk/products/250gb-seagate-st92505610as-momentus-xt-25-95-mm-sata-3gb-s-7200rpm-32mb-cache-ncq



Fair point. If you choose to go down the "Hybrid" drive route, check out eBuyer too. The larger 320Gb version is cheaper there, as it's free delivery (for everyone) as oppposed to Scan's £4.80 delivery charge.
Seagate 320Gb Momentus XT

Edited by: "lnb1996" 5th Jun 2011

Ok, this is probably not the best SSD in the universe, but it is definitely a hot deal at this price. Heat added.

nice cheap price, ideal for a low power no moving parts server, i bought one from here for £58 which is in my optiplex 160 server, absolutley quiet , low power and no moving parts, its on 24/7 and superb.

horses for courses, not everyone wants a porsche when a fiesta will do.

can anyone recommend a good ssd around 64gb that has good performance

judging from these comments I think I'm going to pass, also what is the best brand for ssds

thecheekymonkey

ideal for a low power no moving parts server



Not saying you're wrong, if you're server is being hammered constantly, but have read that SSDs generally use the same amount of power in real-world circumstances. Something to do with the way regular hard drives use more or less power at different times, whereas SSDs use power at a consistent rate.

For £46 this is probably the most cost effective upgrade to any PC or Laptop without a SSD, very good deal.

Banned

J400uk

For £46 this is probably the most cost effective upgrade to any PC or … For £46 this is probably the most cost effective upgrade to any PC or Laptop without a SSD, very good deal.




are you suggesting that I am better off replacing my 250GB lappy drive with this?

howardino

are you suggesting that I am better off replacing my 250GB lappy drive … are you suggesting that I am better off replacing my 250GB lappy drive with this?



Yes, definitely. It will run a lot faster

I have SSDs in all my PCs for the OS, keep my data on a NAS/ External hard drive.
Edited by: "J400uk" 5th Jun 2011

Banned

J400uk

Yes, definitely. It will run a lot fasterI have SSDs in all my PCs for … Yes, definitely. It will run a lot fasterI have SSDs in all my PCs for the OS, keep my data on a NAS/ External hard drive.




LOL, you're serious too. You really think it would be a step forward to reduce my hard drive to an almost unworkable 32GB and carry a portable hard drive - and there's me at the point where I'm looking to move up to 500MB. How little I clearly know.

Could you quantify 'run a lot faster' for us.

The biggest bottleneck on my laptop is the speed of my broadband connection and the rate at which I can type. How does it help with them?

Lets face it, in the real world for ordinary joes like me, a few seconds saved at boot up is hardly worth downgrading to this drive.

howardino

LOL, you're serious too. You really think it would be a step forward to … LOL, you're serious too. You really think it would be a step forward to reduce my hard drive to an almost unworkable 32GB and carry a portable hard drive - and there's me at the point where I'm looking to move up to 500MB. How little I clearly know.Could you quantify 'run a lot faster' for us.The biggest bottleneck on my laptop is the speed of my broadband connection and the rate at which I can type. How does it help with them? Lets face it, in the real world for ordinary joes like me, a few seconds saved at boot up is hardly worth downgrading to this drive.



You could install a 500GB HDD in the optical bay for data. A SSD provides more than just a faster boot, it makes a marked improvement in load times of applications (and makes them a lot more 'nippy.') Of course whether it's worth it, and indeed if you can do without an optical drive, is entirely down to the individual.

That being said, 32GB is too small imo, as I said in my first post. Once SSDs become the norm, we'll wonder how we ever lived without them.


Edited by: "bo0td" 5th Jun 2011

Not a bad deal. 32GB will be fine for a basic Windows 7 installation and a few programmes. Not enough space for games however.

ShaunnyBwoy

First I've ever heard of an SSD carrying a cache or a seek time. The … First I've ever heard of an SSD carrying a cache or a seek time. The point of an SSD is to be one big gigantic cache, and since there are no moving parts, there is not seek time latency. The only equivalent would be IOPS, which isn't on the description.But then we are talking about Dabs here.



All SSD's released in the past 2 years have cache. Mine has 256mb! The last one to not have cache was the gen 1 jmicrons.
They also do technically have measurable seek times - just really small < 1ms

IOPS?

Sounds like MW3.

Bo0td

It's too small...



That's what she said.

Nice price. But I think I'll just wait for something larger.

Alyx

I think I'll just wait for something larger.



That's what she said!


This would be ideal in my HP microserver, instead of booting from a memory stick which takes an age.

Why is it too small.
You want an SSD for performance.
If you install the OS on this where all the performance is required then Install a standard HDD for your files and Programs it will do a great job + save power with HDD powerdown..
If its for a laptop then use external HD for personal files encrypted with bitlocker.
Windows 7 takes 50% yes but that leaves you 15GB for your assential programs.
Voted Hot

Fnz

Not saying you're wrong, if you're server is being hammered constantly, … Not saying you're wrong, if you're server is being hammered constantly, but have read that SSDs generally use the same amount of power in real-world circumstances. Something to do with the way regular hard drives use more or less power at different times, whereas SSDs use power at a consistent rate.




similar argument with LCDs (constant power) and plasmas (uses more power during bright scenes, but alot less than LCDs in dark scenes), something that the clueless planks at Which? ought to understand

Buy two and stripe them?

J400uk

Yes, definitely. It will run a lot fasterI have SSDs in all my PCs for … Yes, definitely. It will run a lot fasterI have SSDs in all my PCs for the OS, keep my data on a NAS/ External hard drive.




i have always had a smallish hard drive for OS and main programs - currently using a 7200 WD500 drive but will go for a reasonable sized SSD soon - and my data is on several other drives - currently have about 25tb of storage so i wont be jumping fully onto the SSD bandwagon any time soon, but will upgrade the OS drives to SSD.

I never mix......if for whatever reason my OS develops a prob and i need to reinstall windows then i just format the OS and reinstall windows

some viruses will just attack the OS code so my data is slightly safer being off the OS drive
Edited by: "royals" 6th Jun 2011

howardino

LOL, you're serious too. You really think it would be a step forward to … LOL, you're serious too. You really think it would be a step forward to reduce my hard drive to an almost unworkable 32GB and carry a portable hard drive - and there's me at the point where I'm looking to move up to 500MB. How little I clearly know.


I have to ask - what on EARTH do you need a couple-of-hundred Gig of storage on a laptop for?

It's not that long since laptops came with 20-30Gb drives - they then stayed around 60Gb for ages and it's only recently people have gone beyond that...

30Gb is a bit small but it's quite possible to get Windows and your programs on there - so it's really about your data - how much there is - why you've carrying it all around on a device so easily broken, stolen or lost...

joedredd

Buy two and stripe them?


Double your chances of data loss - roll up, roll up...

This could be a great addition to anyone with a new Z68 motherboard - chance to fire up the spangly SRT technology
For that reason, primarily, Hot !
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text