OEM Microsoft Windows Home Server 2011 64bit £35.84 Delivered @ CCL
460°Expired

OEM Microsoft Windows Home Server 2011 64bit £35.84 Delivered @ CCL

64
Found 27th May 2013
Best current price on WHS 2011, and a great price on some good software to install on to your HP Microserver, with plenty of stock.

Slight amend to price to include Royal Mail 1st Class @ 95p

Overview: Designed specifically for families with digital lifestyles, the affordable and easy-to-use Windows® Home Server 2011 provides a familiar, simple, and reliable way to store, stream, share, and automatically back up your photos, videos, music and other important documents.

64 Comments

surely ebuyer is cheaper 34.98 plus quidco
ebuyer.com/267…128

Original Poster

deadalus3000

surely ebuyer is cheaper 34.98 plus … surely ebuyer is cheaper 34.98 plus quidcohttp://www.ebuyer.com/267548-microsoft-windows-home-server-2011-licence-and-media-1-server-ccq-00128



£38.56 including postage from eBuyer

Not if you live in NI - some carp about Royal Mail insurance for NI.

ibiza

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/server



Nice troll....not

I'm not 100% sure why I'd want to spend north of £30 on this, when my server already runs Solaris 11 for free...

If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and download Windows Server 2012 legitimately. You can get an NUS card if you sign up to computer courses offered by Groupon or amazon (discounted online courses which last a year therefore give you access to NUS)

Hope this helps some people

flegg

If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and … If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and download Windows Server 2012 legitimately. You can get an NUS card if you sign up to computer courses offered by Groupon or amazon (discounted online courses which last a year therefore give you access to NUS) Hope this helps some people



Yes that's what I did. A good job too as WHS 2011 apparently does work on small HD's/SSD's, not sure what the minimum size is but my 64GB Kingston was a no go. Somebody on AV Forums said their might be a complicated workaround but was above my capabilities.

flegg

If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and … If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and download Windows Server 2012 legitimately. You can get an NUS card if you sign up to computer courses offered by Groupon or amazon (discounted online courses which last a year therefore give you access to NUS) Hope this helps some people

Dude your a legend! Great find

Interesting. I have a NUS Extra card, but can not manage to log in and sign up with dreamspark?

Normally the main downside of Linux/Ubuntu/Debian/Endlessdistrolist is you cannot play more up to date windows games (if you are into playing games).

Its a server OS - why fork out when the free version is seen by many as better (& only a tiny percentage of viruses are not for windows).

ibiza

Its a server OS - why fork out when the free version is seen by many as … Its a server OS - why fork out when the free version is seen by many as better (& only a tiny percentage of viruses are not for windows).



This. Plus: If you have even slightly care about your data, and are not using a resilient filesystem such as ZFS, you're going to potentially have a lot of tears in your near future. Trusting typical household data (photos, accounts, homework, home movies etc) to NTFS is simply moronic.

I'm interested in Solaris 11, I can do all I require with Linux on my Microserver. is the main reason for using Solaris, that it supports ZFS? Could I use Solaris to manage Ip cameras and record without it costing me anymore than it would with Linux? Does it support media serving and mkv playback as easily as Linux does?

thisisgil

This. Plus: If you have even slightly care about your data, and are not … This. Plus: If you have even slightly care about your data, and are not using a resilient filesystem such as ZFS, you're going to potentially have a lot of tears in your near future. Trusting typical household data (photos, accounts, homework, home movies etc) to NTFS is simply moronic.



Not backing up is simply moronic, NTFS is fine.

Got this to work on my 60gb SSD found a guide online, ill see if i can find it again and post here

yorkie

Yes that's what I did. A good job too as WHS 2011 apparently does work on … Yes that's what I did. A good job too as WHS 2011 apparently does work on small HD's/SSD's, not sure what the minimum size is but my 64GB Kingston was a no go. Somebody on AV Forums said their might be a complicated workaround but was above my capabilities.

Installation onto a SSD 60gb:

Install Windows Home Server 2011 to 64GB (or other SSD), with a view to be used as the entire system drive:

1) Remove all HDD from the system, apart from the SSD you will install to (all data will be lost).
2) Format an NTFS USB stick, and create a file in the root called cfg.ini.
3) Open the cfg.ini in a text editor (i.e. notepad - see image)
4) Add the following to the file:

[WinPE]
ConfigDisk=1
CheckReqs=0
WindowsPartitionSize=MAX

5) Close the file and save it.
6) Insert the USB drive into the WHS PC
7) Power up and boot from the WHS DVD
The partition page will be skipped, other than this the install will continue as per usual.
9) Job Done!

Cached Source: webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:x65lQkcGXVcJ:forums.connecteddigitalworld.com/top…=uk

and

forum.wegotserved.com/ind…nd/
Edited by: "cykb" 27th May 2013

Ok have I got this right....?
I can sign up to the Sage 50 course through Groupon (when its available) at e-careers for £59.00, then register for NUS card and use that to register with Microsoft DreamSpark where I can download Server 2012 for free?

Tempted to sign up for the PRINCE2 course for £99.00 and actually do it...

Are there any cheaper courses than £59.00 that you get get NUS?

Thanks

thisisgil

This. Plus: If you have even slightly care about your data, and are not … This. Plus: If you have even slightly care about your data, and are not using a resilient filesystem such as ZFS, you're going to potentially have a lot of tears in your near future. Trusting typical household data (photos, accounts, homework, home movies etc) to NTFS is simply moronic.



Ridiculous comment....
Edited by: "steve28" 27th May 2013

NTFS is well proven.
Can't remember the last time I had a file corruption issue on Windows Server 2008 or above.
Server 2003, yes, very occasionally, but that tended to be more an issue with HP smart array controllers than NTFS itself.

Original Windows Home Server DID have file corruption issues if memory serves but I believe that was due to Disk Extender rather than NTFS itself.
Only bugbear I have with WHS 2011 is that it is VERY slow to recover individual files from backup.
But I managed to get unlimited cloud storage with SurDoc so that isn't so much of an issue.

I heard (through an as equally unsubstantiated comment as thisisgil's) that ZFS needed some fairly beefy (relatively speaking) hardware and upwards of 16GB ram? kind of rules it out for my idea of a cheap low power file server

flegg

If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and … If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and download Windows Server 2012 legitimately. You can get an NUS card if you sign up to computer courses offered by Groupon or amazon (discounted online courses which last a year therefore give you access to NUS) Hope this helps some people



Would this NUS card give all the usual student benefits such as discounted cinema tickets and discount at shops?

Check out the nusextra site

rtbsghgfh

I heard (through an as equally unsubstantiated comment as thisisgil's) … I heard (through an as equally unsubstantiated comment as thisisgil's) that ZFS needed some fairly beefy (relatively speaking) hardware and upwards of 16GB ram? kind of rules it out for my idea of a cheap low power file server



I run Solaris 11 on an old Dell Optiplex P4 dating back to 2005 with 2GB of Ram. It's absolutely fine (although if you want to use compression and deduplication, you'd probably need a beefier system). In fact, when I first started experimenting, I only had 1GB of RAM in the Optiplex AND the storage was 6 x 1TB hard drives over USB! Despite this, it was still fast enough to stream an uncompressed Blu Ray image over my network (wired).

Either way, it's free for personal / evaluation usage. Go to oracle.com/tec…tml and try a live image. If you like it, you can then go ahead and install it more permenently, and if you don't - you've wasted a blank CD and can go ahead and try something else!

steve28

Ridiculous comment....



Erm - it's well established that NTFS will corrupt data if active during a power cut. Why anybody would think this is a good choice for a server filesystem is beyond me.

fishmaster

I'm interested in Solaris 11, I can do all I require with Linux on my … I'm interested in Solaris 11, I can do all I require with Linux on my Microserver. is the main reason for using Solaris, that it supports ZFS? Could I use Solaris to manage Ip cameras and record without it costing me anymore than it would with Linux? Does it support media serving and mkv playback as easily as Linux does?



Well.. for me, the major draw of Solaris 11 was ZFS which is probably the best filesystem you can use on a server, and absolutely bulletproof. However, I have found Solaris 11 to be a lot more stable on cheaper hardware than any of the various flavours of *Nix I've tried over the years (Including Ubuntu, Fedora, RHEL, Foresight and others). It's also configured to be useful out of the box, so you don't need to spend time faffing around to make SAMBA (and by extension file sharing with window boxes / most consumer grade ethernet enabled devices) work.

I fell in love with Solaris when I managed to corrupt (completely overwrite the GUID and other data) of 2 of the 6 x 1 TB drives attached to the system. Despite this, ZFS noticed the corrupt drives and over the course of 24 hours automatically rebuilt all the missing data with no manual intervention. I was even able to access ALL of my available data whilst the corruption was being repaired!! Essentially, ZFS is so rock solid, that you can basically get away with ignoring any on-site backup needs (although I do send my data to a cloud backup provider, to ensure that I'm able to restore it in the event of a flood / fire etc)

I am not sure about your specific usage cases, however. I literally use my Solaris server as a dumb box - it sits there and stores 12TB of the family's data - music, video, household budgets, documents, downloads, RAW images from cameras etc. All the decoding etc is done on the device it's streaming to (so for example, a boxee box connected to the network decodes and displays the videos in the living room). I chose to do it this way so I could get away with doing a minimum to the actual server, and lower the overhead significantly, making it more effective on older hardware with less resources.

Having said that, Solaris does have a feature called "Zones" which is basically like an integrated virtual Linux environment. If you're at an intermediate level, you should be able to configure most Linux software within a zone with a bit of tweaking.

thisisgil

Well.. for me, the major draw of Solaris 11 was ZFS which is probably the … Well.. for me, the major draw of Solaris 11 was ZFS which is probably the best filesystem you can use on a server, and absolutely bulletproof. However, I have found Solaris 11 to be a lot more stable on cheaper hardware than any of the various flavours of *Nix I've tried over the years (Including Ubuntu, Fedora, RHEL, Foresight and others). It's also configured to be useful out of the box, so you don't need to spend time faffing around to make SAMBA (and by extension file sharing with window boxes / most consumer grade ethernet enabled devices) work.I fell in love with Solaris when I managed to corrupt (completely overwrite the GUID and other data) of 2 of the 6 x 1 TB drives attached to the system. Despite this, ZFS noticed the corrupt drives and over the course of 24 hours automatically rebuilt all the missing data with no manual intervention. I was even able to access ALL of my available data whilst the corruption was being repaired!! Essentially, ZFS is so rock solid, that you can basically get away with ignoring any on-site backup needs (although I do send my data to a cloud backup provider, to ensure that I'm able to restore it in the event of a flood / fire etc)I am not sure about your specific usage cases, however. I literally use my Solaris server as a dumb box - it sits there and stores 12TB of the family's data - music, video, household budgets, documents, downloads, RAW images from cameras etc. All the decoding etc is done on the device it's streaming to (so for example, a boxee box connected to the network decodes and displays the videos in the living room). I chose to do it this way so I could get away with doing a minimum to the actual server, and lower the overhead significantly, making it more effective on older hardware with less resources. Having said that, Solaris does have a feature called "Zones" which is basically like an integrated virtual Linux environment. If you're at an intermediate level, you should be able to configure most Linux software within a zone with a bit of tweaking.



OK it sounds like a plan to try Solaris 11 on my N36L.

For anyone curious regarding ZFS, check the Data Integrity section in the following article >

en.wikipedia.org/wik…Zfs

A big problem with WHS11 is that it is not compatible with windows 8, so be warned if that is what you are using.

Am I wrong or did the price shot up to £43.50 + S&H?

... well it's now £36.46 inc 1st class S&H! Close enough!
Edited by: "RueFondary" 28th May 2013

I'm seeing £43.50 as well, dang it.

Original Poster

thisisgil

Erm - it's well established that NTFS will corrupt data if active during … Erm - it's well established that NTFS will corrupt data if active during a power cut. Why anybody would think this is a good choice for a server filesystem is beyond me.



I think we need to think about application here?

1. This is a home server not a data center
2. If you are that concerned about data integrity, you'd be running a UPS

It is true that NTFS is not as good as ZFS, but NTFS does have safeguards in place and although data loss is possible, it is rare as there are write protection methods in place such as journaling.

Another thing to consider, the purchase of an OS doesn't just revolve around the file system used, it's about features and usability, Windows home server isn't an enterprise grade OS, but is certainly designed to make management easy for someone who may not be a computer expert.

Please also be aware that the file system, or utilising RAID is not a substitute for a backup strategy, they aim to keep the system up an running but a catastrophic failure / fire / theft will result in loss of data. Ideally you need an off site backup, be that in the cloud or just a hard disk or tape take off site.

More info on NTFS here by the way:

superuser.com/que…age

Original Poster

By the way, if you have missed the deal then keep an eye on the CCL website, going by the past history it'll be back down in price again

flegg

If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and … If you have an NUS card you can sign up to Microsoft DreamSpark and download Windows Server 2012 legitimately. You can get an NUS card if you sign up to computer courses offered by Groupon or amazon (discounted online courses which last a year therefore give you access to NUS) Hope this helps some people



Thanks, flegg!

Original Poster

Stock back in at the old price (in title) by the way! have requested unexpiration

Good price, but Xpenology is free and far better

fishmaster

OK it sounds like a plan to try Solaris 11 on my N36L. For anyone curious … OK it sounds like a plan to try Solaris 11 on my N36L. For anyone curious regarding ZFS, check the Data Integrity section in the following article >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zfs



Solaris and ZFS doesn't really go to well with the Microserver, will also need a lot of ram.
I run Solaris/ZFS/Napp IT on a e3-1230v2, did have it on my Microserver but sold it so I can get a N54L to continue with writing new bios.

Original Poster

RustySpoons

Good price, but Xpenology is free and far better



Does depend on what else you want to do with it though, if you are running pure fileserver I wont dispute it

Original Poster

RustySpoons

Solaris and ZFS doesn't really go to well with the Microserver, will also … Solaris and ZFS doesn't really go to well with the Microserver, will also need a lot of ram. I run Solaris/ZFS/Napp IT on a e3-1230v2, did have it on my Microserver but sold it so I can get a N54L to continue with writing new bios.



Are you "TheBay" by any chance, or just another BIOS modder??

GOOD DEAL

XEntity

Are you "TheBay" by any chance, or just another BIOS modder??



Yes I am "TheBay"

Original Poster

RustySpoons

Yes I am "TheBay"



Big fan of your work, referred your thread in my Microserver guide!

tekforums.net/gui…de/
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