Oil Filled 2500 watt Radiator with Built in Fan Heater £39.99 @ Lidl
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Oil Filled 2500 watt Radiator with Built in Fan Heater £39.99 @ Lidl

£39.99LIDL Deals
54
Found 24th Oct 2011
THINKING ABOUT GETTING ONE OF THESE AS WE HAVE ELECTRIC HEATING WHICH TAKES AGES TO WARM UP IN OUT HOUSE AND NO HEATING AT ALL IN OUR KITCHEN WHICH WAS A CONVERTED GARAGE.

States available from today

With 3 heat settings (W): 800, 1200 & 2000
Max. 2500 watt
With large surface area for optimum heat transfer
With frost protector and indicator light
With optional fan heater (W): 500
Variable thermostat with frost protection
Integrated cable storage
On 4 smooth-running castors
Available in white or black
Size approx. (cm): 65 x 46 x 29
3 year manufacturer’s warranty

If this is not a good price for all it has on it I am happy to be corrected as I always like a good deal for my money!

54 Comments

May want to update the power rating to kw from watts!!

Original Poster

Ooops can you tell I know very little about this kind of thing! - thanks.

cheddarman

May want to update the power rating to kw from watts!!



Why ?? just wondered.

Its not hard to work out that 2500 watts is 2.5 kw. I would of thought watts was easier to comprehend for most people anyway. i.e it uses the same power as 25 x 100 watts light bulbs.

* Being oil filled, it warms the oil up and stays hot for a while, and only requires shorts bursts of power to keep the tempreture up, so its not constantly on.*
Edited by: "v6dlc" 24th Oct 2011

Good deal if you can afford the electric these things use.

I would save your money as invest in a DeLonghi Dragon series. There design with the boxed in sides funnels the heat like a chimney, you can feel it blowing out of the top with convection alone (not fan assisted).

Why would any decent oil filled radaitor need to have a built in fan heater, cant be much good IMO.

I have two so talking from experience,

http://images5.airandwatercentre.com/images/products/detail/Dragon-3-2kW-chimney.gif
Edited by: "v6dlc" 24th Oct 2011

v6dlc

Why ?? just wondered.Its not hard to work out that 2500 watts is 2.5 kw. … Why ?? just wondered.Its not hard to work out that 2500 watts is 2.5 kw. I would of thought watts was easier to comprehend for most people anyway. i.e it uses the same power as 25 x 100 watts light bulbs. * Being oil filled, it warms the oil up and stays hot for a while, and only requires shorts bursts of power to keep the tempreture up, so its not constantly on.*



Original post had 2.5 watts!!

cheddarman

Original post had 2.5 watts!!



I see, lol

That would be good, could even leave it all year at 2.5 watts lol

Original Poster

I corrected my GENUINE mistake.

v6dlc

I would save your money as invest in a DeLonghi Dragon series. There … I would save your money as invest in a DeLonghi Dragon series. There design with the boxed in sides funnels the heat like a chimney, you can feel it blowing out of the top with convection alone (not fan assisted).Why would any decent oil filled radaitor need to have a built in fan heater, cant be much good IMO.I have two so talking from experience,


so does the delonghi actually give out more heat / kw , i suspect not ... is it better at distributing that heat .. possibly.

wendy07

so does the delonghi actually give out more heat / kw , i suspect not ... … so does the delonghi actually give out more heat / kw , i suspect not ... is it better at distributing that heat .. possibly.



I dont see your point ?

Its simple science, increased convection/air flow, compared to radiant heat. You may not be able to remember the old style radiators.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/02/Household_radiator.jpg

Similar design to Lidl Oil filled in post.

http://www.cnmonline.co.uk/images/P/t_30414-14.jpg

New Design Radiator Similar to Delonghi.

Simple's enough said, you do the research and science !!!!!

Oh the KW refer to the items power consumtion, not how much heat it gives off.
Edited by: "v6dlc" 24th Oct 2011

I can honestly say that this heater is brilliant. We have several oil filled heaters and none of them are as effective as this one.
The fan heater is if you need a burst of instant heat, we never use that function.

v6dlc

I would save your money as invest in a DeLonghi Dragon series. There … I would save your money as invest in a DeLonghi Dragon series. There design with the boxed in sides funnels the heat like a chimney, you can feel it blowing out of the top with convection alone (not fan assisted).Why would any decent oil filled radaitor need to have a built in fan heater, cant be much good IMO.I have two so talking from experience,



What price are they?

v6dlc

Oh the KW refer to the items power consumtion, not how much heat it gives … Oh the KW refer to the items power consumtion, not how much heat it gives off.



Surely these must give out 2.5KW of heat near as damn it or where else is the energy lost ? "Simple's enough said, you do the research and science !!!!!"


Edited by: "leemole101" 24th Oct 2011

So, £40 to buy and £2,378,467,283,467,823,468 to run for a winter???

we got one from screwfix for when we are in the campervan, 32.99, 37.99 with a timer, cracking little thing.

screwfix.com/p/7…239

are they really pricey to run? is it cheaper to put the gch on for a bit?

hmc

are they really pricey to run? is it cheaper to put the gch on for a bit?


i would like to know the same are these cheaper to run than central heating i know its not that easy to compare but you get my point ive always avoided these thinking they would cost to much for what they put out, cheers.

v6dlc

[quote=wendy07] [quote=v6dlc] Oh the KW refer to the items power … [quote=wendy07] [quote=v6dlc] Oh the KW refer to the items power consumtion, not how much heat it gives off.



Fact : heaters are 100% efficient as ALL power consumed is turned into heat (unless you have a fan assisted heater, then you could argue some energy is lost as sound! )

@OP if you're objective is to heat up a room quicker, you are misguided in thinking that an oil filled radiator will do it any quicker. If anything, it will be slower as the oil within the radiator needs to heat up before it will start to radiate at maximum output. Electric convection heaters provide instant heating but do so through heating & circulation of the air. Radiators will need 'line of sight' in the first instance to provide heat.

Eventually both will heat the air and bring the room to the desired temperature. Unless you have a room with very high ceilings, an oil filled radiator shouldn't give that much added benefit.
Edited by: "k9plus1" 24th Oct 2011

marra

i would like to know the same are these cheaper to run than central … i would like to know the same are these cheaper to run than central heating i know its not that easy to compare but you get my point ive always avoided these thinking they would cost to much for what they put out, cheers.



Electricity is produced by burning coal/gas ... on a price per kwh, gas is always cheaper (unless you have a very old/inefficient boiler)
Edited by: "k9plus1" 24th Oct 2011

hmc

are they really pricey to run? is it cheaper to put the gch on for a bit?



Same question I got as well. I got an ill filled electric radiator when I switch it on. I noticed the power consumption jumps from 380W to 1.2kW. on my energy monitor! Is there anything that doesn't drink soooo much electricity. Im dreading the electric bill.

connect to the mains outside your house and run a long extension cable in. saves a few pennies

Hmm, what with rising (criminal greed) gas & elec costs, I had this oil heater earmarked and was waiting for Lidl to stock it.

I've got several slimline electric wall heaters, and thought this radiator might be a bit more economical to use more (given once the oil is heated, it needs relatively little elec to keep it outputting heat)

But after reading some past comments, I r not so sure nowz

Will keep reading.

Banned

i have one of these oil filled heaters..my stairs are in the living room and so we find it gets cold quickly...don't feel the need to put the heat on in whole house all the time so we use this....after 20mins i can feel the heat when i stand at the top of the landing....once it reaches the required temp it turns off automatically and even once i turn it off it stays hot for a while...the fan heaters are rubbish compared to this...they only heat up the surrounding area and as soon as you turn them off it gets cold again...i use the oil filled one in my conservatory as well...one of the best things i bought last winter..before that i just used to have heating on 24/7....

mooo

Same question I got as well. I got an ill filled electric radiator when I … Same question I got as well. I got an ill filled electric radiator when I switch it on. I noticed the power consumption jumps from 380W to 1.2kW. on my energy monitor! Is there anything that doesn't drink soooo much electricity. Im dreading the electric bill.



It only consumes power while its heating the oil - when it's reached the required temperature the thermostat turns it off and the built up heat slowly radiates out. When the temperature eventually drops the heater kicks in again to re-heat the oil.

I've always found thsi type of heater to be quite cost-effective (especially compared to a fan heater) and the heat is much more ambient - not so "dry" - and more like a normal radiator.

hmc

are they really pricey to run? is it cheaper to put the gch on for a bit?



Gas is typically around a third of the price per kWH. A modern gas boiler is 90% efficient; its fairly safe to consider a heater such as this 100% efficient (near enough). A typical sized household central heating will probably use around 15kWH - 25kWH at full whack (as a reference, a modern double panel 600mm high x1000mm wide radiator is roughly 2kWH, similar to the heat output of this oil-filled). You will of course lose a lot of heat through pipes in central heating, plus if you only want to heat a small area, this can work out more efficient. To heat a whole house, gas CH is far, far more efficient (at current energy prices).
Edited by: "jah128" 24th Oct 2011

v6dlc

I dont see your point ? Its simple science, increased convection/air … I dont see your point ? Its simple science, increased convection/air flow, compared to radiant heat. You may not be able to remember the old style radiators.Similar design to Lidl Oil filled in post.New Design Radiator Similar to Delonghi.Simple's enough said, you do the research and science !!!!!Oh the KW refer to the items power consumtion, not how much heat it gives off.



The power consumption and the amount of heat given off are identical - you do the research and the science.

Having extra convectors (like modern radiators) means heat is dissipated more quickly - in the case of modern radiators, this means a higher specific power consumption. In the case of an OFR, it means the heat in the oil is lost more rapidly, so the power is on more often. Having a fan will replicate this effect - dissipating the heat more rapidly (a lot faster than the Delonghi) - but it will of course add noise. I wouldn't say one is necessarily better than the other - having a fan gives this radiator the option of dissipating heat quickly, to provide a rapid warmth to the room, whilst also allowing the slow gentle heating of a traditional OFR when needed. Without the fan, you don't have that option.
Edited by: "jah128" 24th Oct 2011

k9plus1

Fact : heaters are 100% efficient as ALL power consumed is turned into … Fact : heaters are 100% efficient as ALL power consumed is turned into heat (unless you have a fan assisted heater, then you could argue some energy is lost as sound! )



Good old false facts.
100% efficiency is impossible.

It's to do with surface area to volume ratio of the radiator that determines the rate of heat transfer. With less surface area of the radiator heat is transfered to its surroundings less efficienty therefore taking longer to warn up a room. The amount of total heat transfered is the same as you will get transfers by radiation and tiny amount by conduction.

gratts

Good old false facts.100% efficiency is impossible.



Thats not actually true. If your heater draws 2.5KW then it will convert 2.5KW to heat (or as near as is not significant) - its easy to efficiently convert electricity to heat - heat is the normal waste product of electricity consumption!


With regards to which type of heater is better, if your goal is to take a room and get it up to a certain temperature then they are all much of a muchness. If the heater is consuming 2.5kw then that 2.5kw is going somewhere (heat) and unless it continually increases the temp of the radiator then its going to heat the air - radiators dont tend to melt so we can assume its going to air. Where oil radiators will be more efficient is when the room is up to temp, they will click in and out to keep the oil at the desired temp which will keep the room temp constant.

k9plus1

Electricity is produced by burning coal/gas ... on a price per kwh, gas … Electricity is produced by burning coal/gas ... on a price per kwh, gas is always cheaper (unless you have a very old/inefficient boiler)



My boiler is really old & inefficient (60-65% i believe).
My economy 7 makes electric 5p/kwh & Gas costs me 3p/kwh (+VAT)

That makes it cheaper per KWH for me to heat my house before I wake up with electric than with gas.
Also, saves heating the whole house unnecessarily.
My AM heating comes from electric.

Only once economy 7 stops do i use gas.
Edited by: "stave84" 24th Oct 2011

jah128

The power consumption and the amount of heat given off are identical - … The power consumption and the amount of heat given off are identical - you do the research and the science.Having extra convectors (like modern radiators) means heat is dissipated more quickly - in the case of modern radiators, this means a higher specific power consumption. In the case of an OFR, it means the heat in the oil is lost more rapidly, so the power is on more often. Having a fan will replicate this effect - dissipating the heat more rapidly (a lot faster than the Delonghi) - but it will of course add noise. I wouldn't say one is necessarily better than the other - having a fan gives this radiator the option of dissipating heat quickly, to provide a rapid warmth to the room, whilst also allowing the slow gentle heating of a traditional OFR when needed. Without the fan, you don't have that option.



In your own word 'the heat is dissipated more quickly' or (just quicker). Then the room will heat up quicker thus switching of the thermostat on the heater cutting the supply of electricity thus saving money?? or is my science just a little to simple???

Like it or not the Delonghi ones work better full stop, if you are to invest in these then save your pennies and by the ones i recommended. I have had both types and these are better end of goodbye, and have your schoolboy debate with someone who gives a rats ****.
Edited by: "v6dlc" 25th Oct 2011

Air heaters suck and dry the air out, asthmatics and cystics like myself can't stand them if you have either in your life oil is the way forward. If they don't notice the differences there not ill enough which is a good thing but when they get worse its like hell!

http://diseaseoftheweek.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/exploding_head_.jpg

gratts

Good old false facts.100% efficiency is impossible.



Efficiency is defined as the ratio of energy you put in vs the energy lost as heat. If you lose all the energy as heat (as you would in a heater) then you are effectively 100% efficient (not counting losses as the electricity generation plant, etc).

100% efficient engines are not possible. 100% efficient heaters are totally possible, within a closed environment. In fact, heat pumps are often quoted as >100% efficient.


Edited by: "QuackingPlums" 25th Oct 2011

gratts

Good old false facts.100% efficiency is impossible.


Yeah, most things are inefficient and lose energy in the form of heat.... oh wait.

v6dlc

*ENORMOUS* quoted photos removed!Why would any decent oil filled radaitor … *ENORMOUS* quoted photos removed!Why would any decent oil filled radaitor need to have a built in fan heater, cant be much good IMO.

It's a gimmick to fool people into thinking it must be better in some way. Doesn't mean that the radiator is less good, but some of the money you paid for it has gone into the pointless fan heater...

so does the delonghi actually give out more heat / kw , i suspect not ... … so does the delonghi actually give out more heat / kw , i suspect not ... is it better at distributing that heat .. possibly.

It may give out more heat per kilowatt (i.e. the rating) if it can transfer it to the air more efficiently so that the element doesn't have to keep switching off. What it CANNOT do is provide more heat per kilowatt-hour, i.e. unit of energy that you pay for - because they are all 100% efficient at converting electrical energy into heat energy, despite what one lone voice says. (Not disagreeing with you - just emphasising the point.)

having a fan gives this radiator the option of dissipating heat quickly, … having a fan gives this radiator the option of dissipating heat quickly, to provide a rapid warmth to the room, whilst also allowing the slow gentle heating of a traditional OFR when needed. Without the fan, you don't have that option.

Except it's only 500W so pretty much a gimmick.

Like it or not the Delonghi ones work better full stop

Provide some evidence, please, rather than an unsubstantiated statement.
Edited by: "pibpob" 25th Oct 2011

johndjson

Air heaters suck and dry the air out, asthmatics and cystics like myself … Air heaters suck and dry the air out, asthmatics and cystics like myself can't stand them if you have either in your life oil is the way forward. If they don't notice the differences there not ill enough which is a good thing but when they get worse its like hell!

I don't understand where you get that from - where does the water magically disappear to? They decrease *relative* humidity by heating the air, but then so do oil-filled radiators. After all, there wouldn't be any point in one if it didn't. An oil-filled radiator is simply another form of air heater.

v6dlc

I dont see your point ? you do the research and science !!!!!Oh the KW … I dont see your point ? you do the research and science !!!!!Oh the KW refer to the items power consumtion, not how much heat it gives off.



So what else does it do with the energy then - make a lot of noise?, light up?

v6dlc

In your own word 'the heat is dissipated more quickly' or (just quicker). … In your own word 'the heat is dissipated more quickly' or (just quicker). Then the room will heat up quicker thus switching of the thermostat on the heater cutting the supply of electricity thus saving money?? or is my science just a little to simple??? Like it or not the Delonghi ones work better full stop, if you are to invest in these then save your pennies and by the ones i recommended. I have had both types and these are better end of goodbye, and have your schoolboy debate with someone who gives a rats ****.



Why would anyone take the advice of someone who can't spell and can't control their anger?
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