Oil Radiator 1.1Kw £17 from B&Q
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Oil Radiator 1.1Kw £17 from B&Q

10
LocalFound 2nd Aug 2017Edited by:"drnkbeer"
Hello all,
Was having a nosey round my local B&Q and spotted this, not a bad deal at all I thought. Looks like they're clearing old stock as I can no longer see it advertised on their website.

But looks like a quality unit for the price. Small enough to tuck away for those long winter nights to come. Not sure if national, but I can't imagine why it wouldn't be. Worth a look in your local store !
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1.1 Kwh?
not a lot of heating there.
For comparison, I got a 1.5kw heater from Asda a few months ago for £20. On full power setting it really belts out the heat but metal gets extremely hot and you get that annoying creaking noise that often comes with hot radiators. So I dial back the power to 600w or 900w and it's enough to keep the chill out without the distracting creaking sound.

The thing with these lower power radiators (as in this deal) is they tend not to have the power settings so no choice but to run at full power with the annoying creaking noise that comes with it.

To put it another way, just for sake of comparison, I'd rather have a 1.5kw heater running on half power rather than a 750w heater running full power, because even though they're kicking out the same heat the 1.5kw heater had more fins and the metal of each individual fin doesnt get as hot.

Generally speaking, these heaters are much nicer than fan heaters and can't go too wrong with any of them. Theyre ot as noisy and they dont dry the air out. Can always add a standalone fan nearby to distribute the heat if you're impatient.
greenant3 h, 35 m ago

For comparison, I got a 1.5kw heater from Asda a few months ago for £20. …For comparison, I got a 1.5kw heater from Asda a few months ago for £20. On full power setting it really belts out the heat but metal gets extremely hot and you get that annoying creaking noise that often comes with hot radiators. So I dial back the power to 600w or 900w and it's enough to keep the chill out without the distracting creaking sound.The thing with these lower power radiators (as in this deal) is they tend not to have the power settings so no choice but to run at full power with the annoying creaking noise that comes with it.To put it another way, just for sake of comparison, I'd rather have a 1.5kw heater running on half power rather than a 750w heater running full power, because even though they're kicking out the same heat the 1.5kw heater had more fins and the metal of each individual fin doesnt get as hot.Generally speaking, these heaters are much nicer than fan heaters and can't go too wrong with any of them. Theyre ot as noisy and they dont dry the air out. Can always add a standalone fan nearby to distribute the heat if you're impatient.



I didn't even think to check for a variable temperature dial, I'm not an oil radiator aficionado, so I appreciate your input regarding that.

For the price and wattage I didn't think it was too bad a deal, not as good as your 1.5kw for £20, but considering how infrequently I've seen good reductions, this deal isn't too shabby.
Winter is coming...
greenant14 h, 6 m ago

Theyre ot as noisy and they dont dry the air out.


They're certainly not as noisy, but as neither a fan heater nor an oil-filled radiator add or remove moisture, both have no effect on the moisture content in the air. A fan heater might produce hotter air, so its absolute humidity will be lower, but you will only notice that if you sit in the air stream.
pibpob3rd Aug

They're certainly not as noisy, but as neither a fan heater nor an …They're certainly not as noisy, but as neither a fan heater nor an oil-filled radiator add or remove moisture, both have no effect on the moisture content in the air. A fan heater might produce hotter air, so its absolute humidity will be lower, but you will only notice that if you sit in the air stream.



Do you have a source for that info by any chance?
My understanding is the humidity tends to be higher indoors than outside, and if you introduce a fan then the exchange of air between indoors and outdoors is accelerated, thereby reducing humidity indoors Even if there's not a window or door open, the fan would increase the air entering and exiting the vents.
drnkbeer3rd Aug

I didn't even think to check for a variable temperature dial, I'm not an …I didn't even think to check for a variable temperature dial, I'm not an oil radiator aficionado, so I appreciate your input regarding that.For the price and wattage I didn't think it was too bad a deal, not as good as your 1.5kw for £20, but considering how infrequently I've seen good reductions, this deal isn't too shabby.



The temperature dial on my radiator is just a thermostat setting which turns the heating elements on and off every few minutes. You can hear the solenoid clunking on and off when this happens which can be a little distracting. The power setting isnt as granular unfortunately - it has one switch to enable the 600w heating element and a second switch to enable the 900w heating element, and if both switches are on then it adds up to 1500w. Still worth having though so check if the radiator in this offer has similar features. If not, paying a little extra for a heater like I described is worth it IMHO. Unfortunately the last time I was in Asda (same one I originally bought my radiator from) didn't have any radiators/offers but I'll keep my eyes peeled.
greenant20 m ago

Do you have a source for that info by any chance?My understanding is the …Do you have a source for that info by any chance?My understanding is the humidity tends to be higher indoors than outside, and if you introduce a fan then the exchange of air between indoors and outdoors is accelerated, thereby reducing humidity indoors Even if there's not a window or door open, the fan would increase the air entering and exiting the vents.



The source for the info is physics. Yes, if the fan heater somehow causes air to be brought in from somewhere else, then the total amount of water can change, but I don't see how a fan heater is going to do that unless you build it into a hole in the wall.
pibpob9 m ago

The source for the info is physics. Yes, if the fan heater somehow …The source for the info is physics. Yes, if the fan heater somehow causes air to be brought in from somewhere else, then the total amount of water can change, but I don't see how a fan heater is going to do that unless you build it into a hole in the wall.



The more that air circulates in a room, the more it will leak outside the room (through gaps/vents/doors/windows). Pretty sure this falls under physics too D
Only a very minor effect. The fan creates no differential in pressure between the air in the room and that outside, so the only way it would increase exchange of air is if you fired it at an open window etc.
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