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Orange R9 Pro 2019 Carbon Road Bike Black £1749.99 Delivered @ Rutland Cycling
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Orange R9 Pro 2019 Carbon Road Bike Black £1749.99 Delivered @ Rutland Cycling

£1,749.99£2,50030%Rutland Cycling Deals
33
Posted 5th Jun

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

My husband who is a keen cyclist really rates the Orange brand of bikes - he's owned some of their mountain bikes in the past & is really interested in this Orange R9 Pro 2019 Carbon Road Bike - he'd seen it on offer at one retailer for £2500 whereas most others are £2750+ & was tempted - I think I am going to have to sit on his hands to stop him ordering it now it's dropped to £1749.99 at Rutland

Was £2749.99 & now £1749.99 with Free Delivery - still £2500 - £2750 at other retailers - great industry reviews too

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The Pro spec of the R9 features the latest generation of Shimano Ultegra components and has been finished with high quality parts from the likes of Easton with their renowned EA70 SL wheelset and Vittoria's Rubino Pro 28c tyres - everything you need to get some long days in the saddle in.

  • Frame constructed using High Compaction (HC) moulding.
  • Endurance geometry, combining rider comfort, rapid climbing ability and confident descending.
  • Unique 3D printed PU mandrels and carbon layups for each size R9 frame size gives es a consistent ride & feel across the range.
  • Monocoque frame construction using only four bonded joints for a lighter and stronger frame.
  • Oval-shaped, curved, super-thin seatstays reduce road buzz and improve comfort. Internal cable routing using injection-moulded stops.
  • Compatible with cable, electric and wireless drivetrain systems.
  • Flat mount disc brakes front & rear.
  • 12mm bolt through-axles front & rear.


Carbon Fibre frames are now ubiquitous in the world of performance road cycling but the quality can vary enormously. The R9’s frame construction is a precision carbon fibre lay-up using materials from Toray in Japan, one of the world's leading suppliers. The frame’s monocoque structure uses a combination of ultra-high modulus unidirectional composite weave, for its high tensile strength. Bi-directional woven sections are integrated into the complex layup to reinforce areas of high stress. For each different size of the R9 frame, the carbon fibre prepreg sections are CNC machine cut to fit 3D printed mandrels. These custom mandrels are used during the meticulous layup process to construct each of the frame’s sections before the parts go together into the mould. This process creates a strong monocoque structure avoiding superfluous layup material and unnecessary joints maintaining an ultra-light frame.



Industry Reviews

Cyclist Magazine Review

"When I got it out on the road, the R9 RS surprised me by being just a little bit better than I expected in almost every way. There were no foibles in the way it handled, no worrying wobbles at speed and therefore nothing to stop a large grin from forming across my face every time I swung it into a high-speed turn"

Active Traveller Review

"With a beautifully constructed all-carbon frame, the R9 oozes long range speed straight out the box - the geometry and ride has been tuned to distance and comfort rather than all out sprint potential, but make no mistake, this is a rapid machine"



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Top comments
boffin05/06/2019 12:10

Great price. Any idea on the weight?


Well he's no lightweight, his years of rugby playing have now left him a bit flabby, hence the bike riding - I'd say around 105kg ....




oh you mean the bike, no sorry, had a good look around & couldn't find that info - might be worth contacting them HERE
afroylnt05/06/2019 13:57

Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is …Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is sub 9kg.


Particularly when climbing, or riding on rolling terrain, weight can make quite a bit of difference, and a lighter bike will generally feel more responsive and lively. But that said, it's the overall 'whole system' weight that's most important. It's typically a lot easier and and an awful lot cheaper to lose a couple of kilos from your body than it is to lose weight from a bike. Similarly, things such as carrying around an extra water bottle you don't need (~0.5kg), bulky seat packs filled with tools for every eventually etc are all opportunities to shed weight more easily.

But if your body weight is already low, and you're not carrying around lots of crap you don't need, it's a noticeable pleasure to ride a lighter bike, especially one with good wheels and whilst climbing.

Edit:
Look at this model. gribble.org/cyc…tml

I weigh about 68Kg and when I'm fit have an FTP of about 280W. If I ride up a constant 10% climb at my FTP then ~255W is being used just to fight gravity, with the rest on rolling resistance and drag (both of these are minimal on a climb as I'm moving slowly).

If I'm on a bike that weighs 7Kg then I'll travel at about 12.5 km/h. If I'm on a bike that weighs 10Kg then I'll travel about 0.5km/h slower for the same power. That's about 4% slower and means that I'd be at the top of an hour long climb 2.5 mins quicker than if I rode the heavier bike.

On the flat then it makes very little difference and aerodynamics (to reduce your level of drag) become by far the most important factor.
Edited by: "beardyweirdy" 5th Jun
That's a cracking bike for the money -- N+1 = D.I.V.O.R.C.E
33 Comments
That's a cracking bike for the money -- N+1 = D.I.V.O.R.C.E
Great price. Any idea on the weight?
Nice, but if I bought this, my wife would divorce me! (hold on, wait).....
Don't forget to try for 3.15% TCB too.
boffin05/06/2019 12:10

Great price. Any idea on the weight?


Well he's no lightweight, his years of rugby playing have now left him a bit flabby, hence the bike riding - I'd say around 105kg ....




oh you mean the bike, no sorry, had a good look around & couldn't find that info - might be worth contacting them HERE
boffin05/06/2019 12:10

Great price. Any idea on the weight?


circa 7.5kg
John_Surgenor05/06/2019 13:26

circa 7.5kg


That's pretty good for a disc-brake bike. But if the OP's husband really is 105Kg, I'd be checking the rider weight limits of the frame and wheels carefully before buying for a bike that's fairly lightweight.
boffin05/06/2019 12:10

Great price. Any idea on the weight?


Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is sub 9kg.
afroylnt05/06/2019 13:57

Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is …Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is sub 9kg.


For me it is, especially when climbing a mountain
coleaj05/06/2019 14:27

For me it is, especially when climbing a mountain


A few tests show little difference in performance but slightly more for perceived effort assuming the bike is not particularly heavy. But cycling is really all about enjoyment so go with whatever works for you.
afroylnt05/06/2019 13:57

Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is …Is the weight important outside of racing? I would assume the weight is sub 9kg.


Particularly when climbing, or riding on rolling terrain, weight can make quite a bit of difference, and a lighter bike will generally feel more responsive and lively. But that said, it's the overall 'whole system' weight that's most important. It's typically a lot easier and and an awful lot cheaper to lose a couple of kilos from your body than it is to lose weight from a bike. Similarly, things such as carrying around an extra water bottle you don't need (~0.5kg), bulky seat packs filled with tools for every eventually etc are all opportunities to shed weight more easily.

But if your body weight is already low, and you're not carrying around lots of crap you don't need, it's a noticeable pleasure to ride a lighter bike, especially one with good wheels and whilst climbing.

Edit:
Look at this model. gribble.org/cyc…tml

I weigh about 68Kg and when I'm fit have an FTP of about 280W. If I ride up a constant 10% climb at my FTP then ~255W is being used just to fight gravity, with the rest on rolling resistance and drag (both of these are minimal on a climb as I'm moving slowly).

If I'm on a bike that weighs 7Kg then I'll travel at about 12.5 km/h. If I'm on a bike that weighs 10Kg then I'll travel about 0.5km/h slower for the same power. That's about 4% slower and means that I'd be at the top of an hour long climb 2.5 mins quicker than if I rode the heavier bike.

On the flat then it makes very little difference and aerodynamics (to reduce your level of drag) become by far the most important factor.
Edited by: "beardyweirdy" 5th Jun
afroylnt05/06/2019 15:04

A few tests show little difference in performance but slightly more for …A few tests show little difference in performance but slightly more for perceived effort assuming the bike is not particularly heavy. But cycling is really all about enjoyment so go with whatever works for you.


I’ll be climbing Mont Ventoux later this month and other mountains in the area. I’ve got my weight down to 65Kg and my bike weighs 6.1Kg without pedals and extras. With the ascent taking a good 1.5 hours I will be glad for a saving of nearly 3Kg over a “9Kg” bike
coleaj05/06/2019 15:17

I’ll be climbing Mont Ventoux later this month and other mountains in the a …I’ll be climbing Mont Ventoux later this month and other mountains in the area. I’ve got my weight down to 65Kg and my bike weighs 6.1Kg without pedals and extras. With the ascent taking a good 1.5 hours I will be glad for a saving of nearly 3Kg over a “9Kg” bike


Good luck. It's a brutal climb (esp from Malaucene or Bedoin) but really rewarding. I'd recommend riding the Gorges de la Nesque whilst you're there, it's stunning. If you descend from the summit down to Sault then you can go through the Gorges to take you back to Bedoin/Malaucene.
Does anyone know if/when Ribble Cycles, Giant and Cannondale have any Summer sales/discounts or generally lower their prices?

Thank you.
beardyweirdy05/06/2019 15:05

Particularly when climbing, or riding on rolling terrain, weight can make …Particularly when climbing, or riding on rolling terrain, weight can make quite a bit of difference, and a lighter bike will generally feel more responsive and lively. But that said, it's the overall 'whole system' weight that's most important. It's typically a lot easier and and an awful lot cheaper to lose a couple of kilos from your body than it is to lose weight from a bike. Similarly, things such as carrying around an extra water bottle you don't need (~0.5kg), bulky seat packs filled with tools for every eventually etc are all opportunities to shed weight more easily.But if your body weight is already low, and you're not carrying around lots of crap you don't need, it's a noticeable pleasure to ride a lighter bike, especially one with good wheels and whilst climbing.Edit:Look at this model. https://www.gribble.org/cycling/power_v_speed.html I weigh about 68Kg and when I'm fit have an FTP of about 280W. If I ride up a constant 10% climb at my FTP then ~255W is being used just to fight gravity, with the rest on rolling resistance and drag (both of these are minimal on a climb as I'm moving slowly).If I'm on a bike that weighs 7Kg then I'll travel at about 12.5 km/h. If I'm on a bike that weighs 10Kg then I'll travel about 0.5km/h slower for the same power. That's about 4% slower and means that I'd be at the top of an hour long climb 2.5 mins quicker than if I rode the heavier bike.On the flat then it makes very little difference and aerodynamics (to reduce your level of drag) become by far the most important factor.


Interesting info thanks. If you had an 8.5 kg bike that then would only be roughly only 1.25 minutes slower. I can see the benefit of lighter bikes but the extra cost is hard to justify.
beardyweirdy05/06/2019 15:05

Particularly when climbing, or riding on rolling terrain, weight can make …Particularly when climbing, or riding on rolling terrain, weight can make quite a bit of difference, and a lighter bike will generally feel more responsive and lively. But that said, it's the overall 'whole system' weight that's most important. It's typically a lot easier and and an awful lot cheaper to lose a couple of kilos from your body than it is to lose weight from a bike. Similarly, things such as carrying around an extra water bottle you don't need (~0.5kg), bulky seat packs filled with tools for every eventually etc are all opportunities to shed weight more easily.But if your body weight is already low, and you're not carrying around lots of crap you don't need, it's a noticeable pleasure to ride a lighter bike, especially one with good wheels and whilst climbing.Edit:Look at this model. https://www.gribble.org/cycling/power_v_speed.html I weigh about 68Kg and when I'm fit have an FTP of about 280W. If I ride up a constant 10% climb at my FTP then ~255W is being used just to fight gravity, with the rest on rolling resistance and drag (both of these are minimal on a climb as I'm moving slowly).If I'm on a bike that weighs 7Kg then I'll travel at about 12.5 km/h. If I'm on a bike that weighs 10Kg then I'll travel about 0.5km/h slower for the same power. That's about 4% slower and means that I'd be at the top of an hour long climb 2.5 mins quicker than if I rode the heavier bike.On the flat then it makes very little difference and aerodynamics (to reduce your level of drag) become by far the most important factor.


Top notch info. As an FYI i weighed myself before and after a 3hr ride out of interest on Sat AM. It was a warm 23-28C and humid as hell. I discovered to my shock I lost 3kg and I thought I was being good about hydration.

@coleaj Enjoy Ventoux. I'm doing it again early in July. Start early before the heat and wind builds up. I will start at 1st light. Sunrise is quite quick in those parts, but much later than the UK.
Edited by: "boffin" 5th Jun
Maybe I'm wrong to say it but for me a real Orange bike would have a frame manufactured in the UK. I understand there are few carbon frames made in the UK. The only ones I know of are the Hope frames for their mountain bikes. I realise the price probably reflects the imported frame cost savings.
Good reduction on the price and great components. Although looking at the images, it seems cable management has taken a back-seat and seems an afterthought which blemishes the otherwise svelte nature of the bike.

Just me being fussy - have some heat!
wishihadadonkey05/06/2019 12:40

Well he's no lightweight, his years of rugby playing have now left him a …Well he's no lightweight, his years of rugby playing have now left him a bit flabby, hence the bike riding - I'd say around 105kg .... oh you mean the bike, no sorry, had a good look around & couldn't find that info - might be worth contacting them HERE


Him indoors won't be cooking your tea tonight
I always have to laugh at the reviews in the cycling magazines, they are no more than adverts, except you actually pay to read them!
Frequently see terms like "the bike's acceleration is amazing", "this is a rapid machine" etc. I've never owned a bike where I can say it has great acceleration, without me the rider putting a shed load of effort in! And the bit in this review about "no worrying wobbles" is ridiculous, I've never known a bike to have worrying wobbles at speed, even hurtling down a hill on an old bso, it really isn't even a thing...
The only thing rapid about expensive bikes is the diminishing returns on your investment for each extra £1 you spend.
SFconvert08/06/2019 16:50

I always have to laugh at the reviews in the cycling magazines, they are …I always have to laugh at the reviews in the cycling magazines, they are no more than adverts, except you actually pay to read them!Frequently see terms like "the bike's acceleration is amazing", "this is a rapid machine" etc. I've never owned a bike where I can say it has great acceleration, without me the rider putting a shed load of effort in! And the bit in this review about "no worrying wobbles" is ridiculous, I've never known a bike to have worrying wobbles at speed, even hurtling down a hill on an old bso, it really isn't even a thing...The only thing rapid about expensive bikes is the diminishing returns on your investment for each extra £1 you spend.


It's a business and they need advertising revenue. The cheaper bikes sell themselves on value but the high end stuff needs more effort to sell because of its much higher cost, so the b******t factor comes in. As you say diminishing returns but I guess the same could be said for many industries.
8.4kg is a bit heavy for an 'ultra light' bike given that my aluminium Giant Defy with bog standard wheels and Claris shifters is 8.9kg. .
SFconvert08/06/2019 16:50

I always have to laugh at the reviews in the cycling magazines, they are …I always have to laugh at the reviews in the cycling magazines, they are no more than adverts, except you actually pay to read them!Frequently see terms like "the bike's acceleration is amazing", "this is a rapid machine" etc. I've never owned a bike where I can say it has great acceleration, without me the rider putting a shed load of effort in! And the bit in this review about "no worrying wobbles" is ridiculous, I've never known a bike to have worrying wobbles at speed, even hurtling down a hill on an old bso, it really isn't even a thing...The only thing rapid about expensive bikes is the diminishing returns on your investment for each extra £1 you spend.


My old Planet X with deep-sections on it would definitely fall under the "worrying wobbles at speed", especially if it's windy and you're not 100% concentrating! It wasn't a bad bike at all, but when descending at speed, you'd never fall asleep :-)

To be fair, none of the other bikes in the collection exhibit this behaviour, but some bikes can definitely be less stable than others!
boffin05/06/2019 12:10

Great price. Any idea on the weight?


8.4 kg medium
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coleaj05/06/2019 15:17

I’ll be climbing Mont Ventoux later this month and other mountains in the a …I’ll be climbing Mont Ventoux later this month and other mountains in the area. I’ve got my weight down to 65Kg and my bike weighs 6.1Kg without pedals and extras. With the ascent taking a good 1.5 hours I will be glad for a saving of nearly 3Kg over a “9Kg” bike


Never done a proper European climb, only some giddy uk ones, but what I'd fear more is the decending than the climbing lol
Biker2510/06/2019 20:56

8.4kg is a bit heavy for an 'ultra light' bike given that my aluminium …8.4kg is a bit heavy for an 'ultra light' bike given that my aluminium Giant Defy with bog standard wheels and Claris shifters is 8.9kg. .


That's because its a Giant bike, just about the most advanced bikes on the planet at great prices, they are pretty much state of the art in the industry but many buy bikes based on style, geometry, trends or heritage. Even the basic Giant Contend is sub 10kg and that is their entry level bike that goes sub £400 end of season. In fact some still available here.

triuk.com/Tri…893

You can even get one of their lighter 6011 framed bikes for £629 which is about half what many brands are still offering their 6061 framed bikes. Don't know the weight of that one but possibly sub 9kg. Admittedly the frame isn't all 6011, some parts are still 6061. You can weld 6000 series aluminium of different types together. I assume you can probably do the same with 7000 series.

triuk.com/Tri…407

They do that with the highest weight limits in the industry and the longest warranties.
bonzobanana15/06/2019 19:19

That's because its a Giant bike, just about the most advanced bikes on the …That's because its a Giant bike, just about the most advanced bikes on the planet at great prices, they are pretty much state of the art in the industry but many buy bikes based on style, geometry, trends or heritage. Even the basic Giant Contend is sub 10kg and that is their entry level bike that goes sub £400 end of season. In fact some still available here.https://www.triuk.com/Triathlon-Bikes/Giant/Giant-Contend-2-2018-Black/297893You can even get one of their lighter 6011 framed bikes for £629 which is about half what many brands are still offering their 6061 framed bikes. Don't know the weight of that one but possibly sub 9kg. Admittedly the frame isn't all 6011, some parts are still 6061. You can weld 6000 series aluminium of different types together. I assume you can probably do the same with 7000 series.https://www.triuk.com/Triathlon-Bikes/Giant/Giant-Contend-Sl-2-2018-Blue/300407They do that with the highest weight limits in the industry and the longest warranties.


Yes , I agree. I have the Giant Defy Aluux SL frame but my other bike is an aluminium framed Merida Scultura 903 which in my experience is more refined than the Giant in that it's a much smoother ride despite being a bit heavier.
Derek_Lancelot_Shatwell05/06/2019 15:26

Does anyone know if/when Ribble Cycles, Giant and Cannondale have any …Does anyone know if/when Ribble Cycles, Giant and Cannondale have any Summer sales/discounts or generally lower their prices?Thank you.


Bikes have horrendous depreciation so if you know what you're looking for then a nearly near bike from ebay's the best bet.
Biker2515/06/2019 20:37

Bikes have horrendous depreciation so if you know what you're looking for …Bikes have horrendous depreciation so if you know what you're looking for then a nearly near bike from ebay's the best bet.



Thank you
Great spec and a pretty good price too, Canyon equivalent (always a good benchmark) is £2,350. A proper enthusiast's machine.
Biker2515/06/2019 20:35

Yes , I agree. I have the Giant Defy Aluux SL frame but my other bike is …Yes , I agree. I have the Giant Defy Aluux SL frame but my other bike is an aluminium framed Merida Scultura 903 which in my experience is more refined than the Giant in that it's a much smoother ride despite being a bit heavier.


In fairness though Merida are viewed as the second best large scale frame manufacturer in Taiwan after Giant and a fierce competitor of Giant. You have bikes from 2 of the best bike manufacturers in the world with regard manufacturing quality. Merida also own about half of Specialized so most of their mid-range and higher bikes are Merida sourced. Both are OEM frame producers but their prices are too high nowadays so have lost a lot of business to other cheaper brands who often manufacture outside Taiwan and mainland China (Cambodia, Vietnam, Bangladesh etc).
code SAVE100 makes it £1,649.99
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