Panasonic Enloop Lite 550 mAh Rechargeable Batteries AAA - 2 Pack. £2.49 @ Argos
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Panasonic Enloop Lite 550 mAh Rechargeable Batteries AAA - 2 Pack. £2.49 @ Argos

20
Edited by:"kestrelcampbell"Found 7th Sep 2017
The go-to brand for rechargeable batteries.

Can't see these for a better price anywhere else. Lowest it has been on Argos. Seems to be plenty of stock around.

Eneloop lite batteries are ideal for low-to-medium power consumption devices, such as DECT phones and remote controls. They are rechargeable for up to 3000 times which makes it even more economically and environment-friendly.

  • Pack of 2 batteries.
  • Rechargeable and pre-charged.
  • 1.2V.
  • 550mAh.
  • EAN: 5410853058809.
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20 Comments
Very low capacity (550 mAh), but cheap...
OK capacity, and 3000 real charge cycles, 10 times that of Duracell.
Edited by: "LadyEleanor" 7th Sep 2017
DrBones47 m ago

Very low capacity (550 mAh), but cheap...

AAA are typically only 750mah anyway but these are specifically for devices like home phones
No use to me but good price. Heat added
550 mah???... so low!!
I get my recharable batteries from pound land xxx
you_gotta_be_kidding11 h, 22 m ago

AAA are typically only 750mah anyway but these are specifically for …AAA are typically only 750mah anyway but these are specifically for devices like home phones



Wasted in cordless phones though, because these are high-drain devices sitting on charge most of the time so their low self-discharge feature is of no consequence.
danflorin317 h, 14 m ago

550 mah???... so low!!


Rechargeables.. High capacity = lower number of cycles before loss of capacity and lower total number of charges lifetime.. Smaller capacity = more cycles and longer life.

Its complex chemistry/physics, but lower capacity for a given size cell will (generally, good brands etc) give you a longer life.

Heat added and a couple of sets bought, its an absolute steal for clock, home phones, in home displays etc.
Matzi200017 h, 21 m ago

I get my recharable batteries from pound land xxx


Having recently seen this review youtu.be/9hN…Myw I have to concede that Poundland Fusiomax rechargeable batteries are much better than should be expected for 50p each.
samcatch46 m ago

Rechargeables.. High capacity = lower number of cycles before loss of …Rechargeables.. High capacity = lower number of cycles before loss of capacity and lower total number of charges lifetime.. Smaller capacity = more cycles and longer life.Its complex chemistry/physics, but lower capacity for a given size cell will (generally, good brands etc) give you a longer life.Heat added and a couple of sets bought, its an absolute steal for clock, home phones, in home displays etc.



The same logic (lower charge => longer life) interestingly applies to a single battery: if you don't cycle it 0%-100% each time then you get much more cycles. Charging to 100% also reduces the lifetime of the battery already.

My (now ancient) Sony Vaio Z had an option to always charge to 80% only to conserve lifetime. I wish todays devices (smartphones) had that option.
dooper13 m ago

Having recently seen this review https://youtu.be/9hNUbMuJMyw I have to …Having recently seen this review https://youtu.be/9hNUbMuJMyw I have to concede that Poundland Fusiomax rechargeable batteries are much better than should be expected for 50p each.



Maybe that's Kim Jong-un's secret?
samcatch49 m ago

Rechargeables.. High capacity = lower number of cycles before loss of …Rechargeables.. High capacity = lower number of cycles before loss of capacity and lower total number of charges lifetime.. Smaller capacity = more cycles and longer life.Its complex chemistry/physics, but lower capacity for a given size cell will (generally, good brands etc) give you a longer life.Heat added and a couple of sets bought, its an absolute steal for clock, home phones, in home displays etc.



Well yes and no. If the lower capacity is simply the result of using fewer active ingredients surrounded by air, like those cheap disposable cells whose cases you can squeeze, then the lower capacity will not bring any benefits to number of charge cycles. And I am quite sure that such a low capacity is as a result of short-changing you on the actual cell within the case, just like with C and D cells which actually contain AAs.
pibpob1 h, 59 m ago

Well yes and no. If the lower capacity is simply the result of using …Well yes and no. If the lower capacity is simply the result of using fewer active ingredients surrounded by air, like those cheap disposable cells whose cases you can squeeze, then the lower capacity will not bring any benefits to number of charge cycles. And I am quite sure that such a low capacity is as a result of short-changing you on the actual cell within the case, just like with C and D cells which actually contain AAs.


Absolutely, hence my caveat of " (generally, good brands etc)"... Hopefully enloop are not cashing in on their good name to flog an inferior product.

Slower charging and not overcharging also make a big difference to the lifecycle, far better to charge batteries over 24 hours+ than to fast charge them in an hour or two.
Hopefully?

These cells seem to set a world record for rechargables. One that is most likely real too. The old Lidl ones were far too unstable to even last their 1000 charges.
Edited by: "LadyEleanor" 8th Sep 2017
dooper5 h, 38 m ago

Having recently seen this review https://youtu.be/9hNUbMuJMyw I have to …Having recently seen this review https://youtu.be/9hNUbMuJMyw I have to concede that Poundland Fusiomax rechargeable batteries are much better than should be expected for 50p each.


All fine and well, but they are the Poundworld 800mah AA, not AAA.
Last I knew is that Poundworld AAA are 600 mah (550 real?) versus Poundland 350mah.

Both are trashy compared to this quality product.
Edited by: "LadyEleanor" 8th Sep 2017
To my astonishment, an Argos near me still has these!!

These "lite" eneloop have less capacity, but more cycles - obviously the same rule applies, as the capacity goes up with the "ordinary" eneloop and "pro" versions main.panasonic-eneloop.eu/pro…tml

Going to try these out with a TENS machine, these are rated at 1.2V and the device suggests 1.5V, but will see how I get on.
Edited by: "louiselouise" 5th Oct 2017
louiselouise1 h, 37 m ago

To my astonishment, an Argos near me still has these!!These "lite" eneloop …To my astonishment, an Argos near me still has these!!These "lite" eneloop have less capacity, but more cycles - obviously the same rule applies for "ordinary" eneloop and "pro" versions http://main.panasonic-eneloop.eu/products/batteries.htmlGoing to try these out with a TENS machine, these are rated at 1.2V and the device suggests 1.5V, but will see how I get on.



Hopefully you will be OK - the voltage of rechargeables tends to sag less than that of disposables, so the difference isn't as great as it might appear.

I've just looked at the packet of 1900mAh Eneloop AAs I bought in a recent offer. They say "recharge up to 2100 times."
pibpob3 h, 59 m ago

Hopefully you will be OK - the voltage of rechargeables tends to sag less …Hopefully you will be OK - the voltage of rechargeables tends to sag less than that of disposables, so the difference isn't as great as it might appear.I've just looked at the packet of 1900mAh Eneloop AAs I bought in a recent offer. They say "recharge up to 2100 times."



After I pondered over the Voltage issue, I saw this from lightandmatter.org/201…ps/

Fact: using rechargeable NiMH batteries in your flash will give you dramatically better performance than shooting with alkaline batteries. This might seem counter-intuitive at first, since rechargeables are labeled with slightly lower voltage values than alkalines (1.2v rather than 1.5v), but voltage isn’t everything 1. NiMH batteries have much lower internal resistance, and can dump current into a flash significantly faster than alkalines.

I'm assuming Eneloops are the same as regular NiMHs, I'm no expert with these things

Edit: Also, have no idea if this is true, as it's referring to Amazon US and is a few years old, lightandmatter.org/201…ps/ suggests AmazonBasics rechargeables are rebranded Eneloops.

Amazon.com sells AmazonBasics branded AA Pre-Charged NiMH batteries (originally with a black jacket, then white, now black or white). These are made in Japan rather than China and they seem to be rebranded standard Eneloops, and they cost less. They may be previous generation Eneloops, rating at only 1800 charges rather than 2100, but you’re still more likely to lose them or have them stolen before they die. You’ll pay an extra $1 for 8 AmazonBasics than for 4 standard Eneloops.

AmazonBasics are also available as AA Pre-Charged High Capacity NiMH batteries, with a black jacket and 2400 mAh capacity. These ones seem to be rebranded Eneloop Pro (XX) batteries, and again, they cost quite a bit less… about 50% less for a pack of eight (sometimes)! I have a dozen of these and love them.
Edited by: "louiselouise" 6th Oct 2017
louiselouise37 m ago

After I pondered over the Voltage issue, I saw this from …After I pondered over the Voltage issue, I saw this from https://www.lightandmatter.org/2014/tech-photography-articles/best-rechargeable-aa-nimh-batteries-for-your-flash-dont-buy-eneloops/Fact: using rechargeable NiMH batteries in your flash will give you dramatically better performance than shooting with alkaline batteries. This might seem counter-intuitive at first, since rechargeables are labeled with slightly lower voltage values than alkalines (1.2v rather than 1.5v), but voltage isn’t everything 1. NiMH batteries have much lower internal resistance, and can dump current into a flash significantly faster than alkalines.I'm assuming Eneloops are the same as regular NiMHs, I'm no expert with these things Edit: Also, have no idea if this is true, as it's referring to Amazon US and is a few years old, https://www.lightandmatter.org/2014/tech-photography-articles/best-rechargeable-aa-nimh-batteries-for-your-flash-dont-buy-eneloops/ (from 3 years ago, mind) suggests AmazonBasics rechargeables are rebranded Eneloops. Amazon.com sells AmazonBasics branded AA Pre-Charged NiMH batteries (originally with a black jacket, then white, now black or white). These are made in Japan rather than China and they seem to be rebranded standard Eneloops, and they cost less. They may be previous generation Eneloops, rating at only 1800 charges rather than 2100, but you’re still more likely to lose them or have them stolen before they die. You’ll pay an extra $1 for 8 AmazonBasics than for 4 standard Eneloops. AmazonBasics are also available as AA Pre-Charged High Capacity NiMH batteries, with a black jacket and 2400 mAh capacity. These ones seem to be rebranded Eneloop Pro (XX) batteries, and again, they cost quite a bit less… about 50% less for a pack of eight (sometimes)! I have a dozen of these and love them.



Yep, the bit about flashes is true, and Eneloops are NiMH. Voltage sag is caused by internal resistance. Flashes are extremely heavy loads.
Got these today, these are made in Japan. Will edit the picture properly on a PC later.
32256177-mCIcA.jpg32256177-PjbBe.jpg
Edited by: "louiselouise" 15th Oct 2017
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