Panasonic SCUX100EK 300W Hi-Fi with Bluetooth £89.99 @ argos exclusive, was £99.99
340°Expired

Panasonic SCUX100EK 300W Hi-Fi with Bluetooth £89.99 @ argos exclusive, was £99.99

11
Found 8th Nov
Exclusive to argos, Blast music with this 300W Hi-Fi from Panasonic. You'll experience clear, powerful and wide sound with the 13 cm cone woofer and 5 cm cone tweeter. Stream your music wirelessly using Bluetooth or play your CD collection. Clever equalizer, matches the music to the sound, so you hear your favourite tracks as they're meant to be heard.

11 Comments

Original Poster

Picked this up today, Used Bluetooth from my lenovo p2 which worked perfect and gave excellent sound with nice bass.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 9th Nov

I'm pleased you have actually bought this item and can vouch for it being okay, I notice this one is £10 off the regular price so it just about qualifies as a good deal. The other two you posted seemed to be stock items at the regular price. These cheap units are always available for about the prices you have quoted, so I wonder why you posted the other two?

Well done for this post, but the other two just clog up this site with tat.
Edited by: "othen" 8th Nov

No DAB sucks

Power output is wrong, Pana website also suggests RMS, but reading the rest of their description and it is clear they dont know what RMS means.

True power output may be as low as 2-5 watts.

See my post for the Samsung system above.

"Interesting" styling. Optional speaker grills would have been a good idea.

POWYSWALES8 h, 47 m ago

Picked this up today, Used Bluetooth from my lenovo p2 which worked …Picked this up today, Used Bluetooth from my lenovo p2 which worked perfect and gave excellent sound with nice base.


What was the base?

Looks great for the price, but all should be dab radio, need to move with the times

unfortunately and confusingly manufactures use different ways of measuring the amplifiers power output rms stands for root mean square and really is the only measurement you should use as a amplifiers power but due to the size of this unit I would be totally amazed if this was 300 watt rms.
more than likely it is 300 watt pmpo which stands for peak music power out

as Stated above The real power is RMS (Root Mean Square), while PMPO means music power (Peak Music Power Output). How to compare those – you need to split PMPO by 3 and then you will get RMS (almost). For example if you have Unit with 19W RMS / 50W PMPO.
RMS is a voltage that is putting to the speaker in Constance way, without worry of sound quality or speakers damage. PMPO is the highest power at the highest voltage, at the speaker that least less than second.
PMPO is a marketing symbol, because it’s much nicer for producers to put some big numbers. So to be honest, PMPO was created for cheating people at the shops.
When we speak about amplifiers, it is power that amplifier can produce at all time, without any damage.
There is also some compare with voltages. If effective value is 220V, and 310 is maximum (311V)it is because maximum value = effective * the square root. You can very easily check that by testing current by multimeter and than check at the oscilloscope. You will see that measure instrument will show 220 while amplitude of current at oscilloscope is 310.
How we can use that in practice way. In general, speakers power we split by 2 (or3) and we got amplifier, for example: if we hve 100 watts speaker, we can plug it to amplifier with power output abou 50watts. Of course we can plug stronger speakers but not too strong –obviously you wont plug a subwoofer to headphones slot.
hope this helps to explain a little
Edited by: "welsh.hammer" 8th Nov

Actually, you are being too optimistic, PMPO is peak to peak, so halve it, then divide by the number of speakers, then multiply by 0.74.

So 1,000w PMPO in a typical surround sound 5.1 set up (ignoring the .1 as it is usually powered separately) :-

/2 for peak to peak = 500w, divide by 5 speakers = 100watts, multiple by 0.7471 for RMS = 74watts.

This is measured through a resister at 100Hz, so depending on the speaker and amplifier design, the real world results will be less - probably a lot less.

They also tend to measure output at the speaker shredding Total harmonic Distortion (THD), of 1 to 10%; when anything above 0.1% will give you a headache, so of that ~70 watts, perhaps 7 -10 will be usable, 11 - 50 will give you a headache due to the THD, and 50-70 will be clipping so badly, it will damage the voice coils and kill any speaker connected - even a proper 1,000Watt RMS pair.

Then there is speaker sensitivity.

I run (old, but expensive) 25 Watt RMS speakers on a 100Watt (RMS) amp, but never need more than a fraction of the amp's power to make the walls shake as they are very sensitive; the manual says 1 to 5 watts RMS is enough; many modern speakers are very insensitive, so need 50 watts RMS to make a decent sound.

ITMA14 h, 18 m ago

What was the base?


The other end from the top?

Gentle_Giant11 h, 16 m ago

Actually, you are being too optimistic, PMPO is peak to peak, so halve it, …Actually, you are being too optimistic, PMPO is peak to peak, so halve it, then divide by the number of speakers, then multiply by 0.74. So 1,000w PMPO in a typical surround sound 5.1 set up (ignoring the .1 as it is usually powered separately) :-/2 for peak to peak = 500w, divide by 5 speakers = 100watts, multiple by 0.7471 for RMS = 74watts. This is measured through a resister at 100Hz, so depending on the speaker and amplifier design, the real world results will be less - probably a lot less. They also tend to measure output at the speaker shredding Total harmonic Distortion (THD), of 1 to 10%; when anything above 0.1% will give you a headache, so of that ~70 watts, perhaps 7 -10 will be usable, 11 - 50 will give you a headache due to the THD, and 50-70 will be clipping so badly, it will damage the voice coils and kill any speaker connected - even a proper 1,000Watt RMS pair.Then there is speaker sensitivity.I run (old, but expensive) 25 Watt RMS speakers on a 100Watt (RMS) amp, but never need more than a fraction of the amp's power to make the walls shake as they are very sensitive; the manual says 1 to 5 watts RMS is enough; many modern speakers are very insensitive, so need 50 watts RMS to make a decent sound.


Thank you for a lucid explanation, unlike the previous poster's drivel!
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text