Panasonic SD-2511B Multi-Function Bread Maker, Black £84.99 delivered at Amazon (Deal of the Day)
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Panasonic SD-2511B Multi-Function Bread Maker, Black £84.99 delivered at Amazon (Deal of the Day)

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Found 22nd Feb 2016
Top bread maker. Which Best Buy 2015.

The revolutionary SD-2511K breadmaker from Panasonic can create a wide variety of different breads, cakes, scones and jams.
Use a variety of wet ingredients including cheese, olives and sundried tomatoes to make the perfect flavoured artisan bread.
Love sourdough bread? The new SD-2511K now makes sour dough starter helping to rise and enhance the flavour of your bread.
The new rustic scone mode allows you to bake the perfect scones, savory or sweet.
The Fruit Nut dispenser drops the ingredients into your bread at the optimum time, evenly distributing them throughout your bread.

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deleted1416210
Awesome price! Heat given gladly
Excellent price for this
amazing price, thanks!
Don't make this too hot, otherwise it will rise and the bubble will burst! Just buy yourself one, you know you knead it, and it's going to prove itself useful.
Been waiting for the price of this to drop to around £100.
Ordered!
What size refuse sack does this bin take?
Easily the best bread makers out there, had my Panasonic about 10 years and still going strong. Cannot recommend them highly enough. This is a decent price for this one too, very tempted to replace.....
Odd though. The amazon page title is 2511b but "in the box" says 2511k
Anyone recommend a nice sourdough starter?
highwayman8155

Odd though. The amazon page title is 2511b but "in the box" says 2511k



Could be a mistake but, assuming it's not a misprint, my guess would be you quite often see black referred to as K in the electronics world, especially printing / photocopying which obviously Panasonic are involved in. For example, a colour copier will have four toner cartridges - cyan (C), yellow (Y), magenta (M) and black (K). Traditionally, in the printing industry, black is the key colour all the others are keyed to, hence K
As used by Call me Dave?
Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of ingredients and 4 hours worth of electricity?
Not hating … but genuinely interested, I would love to buy it if I could justify the cost
sergiup

Anyone recommend a nice sourdough starter?



Item number 141885936187 on eBay is the one I used. Got a nice twang to it.

Tried a few of them from that seller, but the San Francisco one was the nicest.
Regarding the K Lettering at the end, it could also be that black in Japanese is Kuro.
StuaarrtG

Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of in … Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of ingredients and 4 hours worth of electricity?Not hating … but genuinely interested, I would love to buy it if I could justify the cost



I just ordered. I think if you want quality bread this will make better bread than you get in your local supermarket. Not neccesarily cheaper in the long run
Wow, I didn't know you could do sourdough in a bread machine. This was one of the key reasons stopping me buying a bread machine as I assumed the only way to get sourdough was old school baking. If anyone has any newbie guides on this I'd be be very grateful.
beastman

Wow, I didn't know you could do sourdough in a bread machine. This was … Wow, I didn't know you could do sourdough in a bread machine. This was one of the key reasons stopping me buying a bread machine as I assumed the only way to get sourdough was old school baking. If anyone has any newbie guides on this I'd be be very grateful.



That's interesting to know - I'm a sourdough baker as well. Although to be honest I prefer the more rustic shapes you get from hand forming the dough over the perfect "tin loaf" look, and I've found a baking routine that fits in with my daily routine.
StuaarrtG

Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of in … Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of ingredients and 4 hours worth of electricity?Not hating … but genuinely interested, I would love to buy it if I could justify the cost


You measure electricity in hours? Oh dear. At a rough guess, 5p worth of electricity.
benjus

That's interesting to know - I'm a sourdough baker as well. Although to … That's interesting to know - I'm a sourdough baker as well. Although to be honest I prefer the more rustic shapes you get from hand forming the dough over the perfect "tin loaf" look, and I've found a baking routine that fits in with my daily routine.


To be honest, I don't use my machine to bake bread anymore, haven't done for years. I just use the dough programmes and then form it myself into rolls / baps / loaves and bake in the normal oven. Not sure how this does sourdough as my older model doesn't have that feature. Mine does have similar "culture" recipes in the book which means you making dough the day before, leaving it in the machine and then adding more stuff to it and setting it off on another programme.
I've always wanted a breadmaker. But the wife has denied me one because we had a very small kitchen. Fortunately for me we moved and we now have a utility and a big kitchen - so her argument doesn't apply anymore. I'm not even gonna tell her
great machines, mine panni works 6years now with 1to2 loafs per week no probs. if it breaks one day, buying same brand straight away. have some heat
What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit easier with the machine? Wire rack or tins? Storage containers?
For baking loaves I always use the 4.5 hour Italian program.

For the yeast I recommend Doves Farm Quick Yeast 125g yeast £1.26 from Lakeland or Ocado
https://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Doves-Farm-Quick-Yeast/17257011
It's less fiddly than the little sachets.
or Morrisons sell fresh yeast for 50p for 4 blocks which you can divide each one into into 4
None of the supermarkets near me give away fresh yeast any more.


Edited by: "mrunderhill2" 22nd Feb 2016
At this price I'm picking one up as a birthday present for a friend (who was really impressed when I took a fresh-baked loaf from my Panny 2512 over). Honestly thought mine would be relegated to a cupboard after a few weeks but months later and it's in regular use baking great bread.
Cristiano

What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit … What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit easier with the machine? Wire rack or tins? Storage containers?


A wire rack for the bread to cool on will be very useful, possibly a storage container depending on how fast you get through a loaf. A good breadknife also makes life easier ...
For slicing loaves, I use a well sharpened 20cm cooks knife.
I've used electric knives and bread knives and find the chefs knife is best.
It was reduced to £60 from amazon when I bought it last year but unfortunately had to return it as wife wasn't happy with it hogging crammed kitchen space.

Edited by: "lahsiv2004" 22nd Feb 2016
Cristiano

What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit … What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit easier with the machine? Wire rack or tins? Storage containers?



To get going you'll need standard cooking equipment like scales, measuring spoons and measuring jugs (though I weigh my water, because it's easiest to weigh it straight into the breadmaking pan).

You'll need a pair of oven gloves when getting the loaf out, plus a heat resistant surface to put it on whilst in the tin (I put it on a plastic chopping board, it now has a nice round mark where it melted). I always leave the loaf to cool for 5 mins before tipping out onto a wire rack. Unless you're planning on eating the loaf in one sitting, you'll need a bread bin, the best I've found is the Joseph Joseph wood lid one, but it's expensive (I'm sure mine was cheap from Costco, I'd never pay £50 for a bread bin) I think the wood lid helps with humidity.

As for flour, I tend to use the premium mill ground variety, Bacheldre or Shipton Mill usually, from experience the flours ground by water mill seem to be better, but that might be luck. I tend to buy 16-25kg sacks to keep the cost down. Yeast - I always use Doves Farm, I've got a Lakeland within walking distance so easy to get from their, doesn't seem to be any more expensive than a supermarket.

If you're cooking in a utility room, you may find the bread rises less, so during the colder months, where the utility room is often sub 10 degrees C, I add an extra half teaspoon of yeast.

The cost of a load works out at roughly the price of a good sliced loaf, since it's a whole lot better, it's worth it, plus throw in a few sesame, pumpkin or sunflower (hulled) seeds and you've baked a loaf of artisan bread, and saved yourself a packet.

My machine makes 3 or 4 loaves a week and usually a pizza dough and has done for 5+ years. I tend to use the machine for loaves, although the dough cycles are great if busy, I prefer to use my mother-in-laws 40 year old Kenwood chef, to prepare dough for oven cooking, which in my opinion makes for a better roll.

Don't be afraid to use the fast bake either, with some flours I've found the 3 hour fast bake produces a better loaf, than the standard 5 hour wholemeal.

Also, rather than have tall slices, I cut the loaf in half top to bottom, then slice each half from one end, this way you have better sized slices for toasting.

If my bread machine packed in, I'd be thinking about a replacement immediately, though thankfully I do have a spare. In my house only the fridge and freezer are more important.

mike
Edited by: "mbuckhurst" 22nd Feb 2016
Ordered, thanks OP! Been on the lookout for a good deal on bread makers since the turn of the year.
Begize

Could be a mistake but, assuming it's not a misprint, my guess would be … Could be a mistake but, assuming it's not a misprint, my guess would be you quite often see black referred to as K in the electronics world, especially printing / photocopying which obviously Panasonic are involved in. For example, a colour copier will have four toner cartridges - cyan (C), yellow (Y), magenta (M) and black (K). Traditionally, in the printing industry, black is the key colour all the others are keyed to, hence K



​I just learned me something
mbuckhurst

To get going you'll need standard cooking equipment like scales, … To get going you'll need standard cooking equipment like scales, measuring spoons and measuring jugs (though I weigh my water, because it's easiest to weigh it straight into the breadmaking pan).You'll need a pair of oven gloves when getting the loaf out, plus a heat resistant surface to put it on whilst in the tin (I put it on a plastic chopping board, it now has a nice round mark where it melted). I always leave the loaf to cool for 5 mins before tipping out onto a wire rack. Unless you're planning on eating the loaf in one sitting, you'll need a bread bin, the best I've found is the Joseph Joseph wood lid one, but it's expensive (I'm sure mine was cheap from Costco, I'd never pay £50 for a bread bin) I think the wood lid helps with humidity.As for flour, I tend to use the premium mill ground variety, Bacheldre or Shipton Mill usually, from experience the flours ground by water mill seem to be better, but that might be luck. I tend to buy 16-25kg sacks to keep the cost down. Yeast - I always use Doves Farm, I've got a Lakeland within walking distance so easy to get from their, doesn't seem to be any more expensive than a supermarket.If you're cooking in a utility room, you may find the bread rises less, so during the colder months, where the utility room is often sub 10 degrees C, I add an extra half teaspoon of yeast.The cost of a load works out at roughly the price of a good sliced loaf, since it's a whole lot better, it's worth it, plus throw in a few sesame, pumpkin or sunflower (hulled) seeds and you've baked a loaf of artisan bread, and saved yourself a packet.My machine makes 3 or 4 loaves a week and usually a pizza dough and has done for 5+ years. I tend to use the machine for loaves, although the dough cycles are great if busy, I prefer to use my mother-in-laws 40 year old Kenwood chef, to prepare dough for oven cooking, which in my opinion makes for a better roll.Don't be afraid to use the fast bake either, with some flours I've found the 3 hour fast bake produces a better loaf, than the standard 5 hour wholemeal.Also, rather than have tall slices, I cut the loaf in half top to bottom, then slice each half from one end, this way you have better sized slices for toasting.If my bread machine packed in, I'd be thinking about a replacement immediately, though thankfully I do have a spare. In my house only the fridge and freezer are more important.mike


I find the only thing you need is a measuring scale, because a measuring spoon and a measuring cup are provided, and you simply put the bread pan on the scales and tip weighed ingredients straight in.

Also, there's no need to wash the bread pan - the few crumbs left over after the loaf is tipped out will just be harmlessly incorporated into the next one.

Interesting to hear you find that it can't regulate its temperature properly in very cold rooms. My kitchen doesn't get quite that cold.

Bread maker bread does go stale very quickly - it's the price you pay for it being so fresh to begin with. I leave a loaf uncovered for a day to keep the crust crispy and then after that cover it loosely to stop it drying out too much.

I do find the rectangular shape of these machines annoying, because when sitting on a worktop you can't open the lid without it hitting wall cupboards. Their old squarer design was more sensible. Fortunately I've got somewhere to keep it permanently where this isn't an issue. The measuring cup and spoon live inside it - once it's cool!
mbuckhurst

To get going you'll need standard cooking equipment like scales, … To get going you'll need standard cooking equipment like scales, measuring spoons and measuring jugs (though I weigh my water, because it's easiest to weigh it straight into the breadmaking pan).You'll need a pair of oven gloves when getting the loaf out, plus a heat resistant surface to put it on whilst in the tin (I put it on a plastic chopping board, it now has a nice round mark where it melted). I always leave the loaf to cool for 5 mins before tipping out onto a wire rack. Unless you're planning on eating the loaf in one sitting, you'll need a bread bin, the best I've found is the Joseph Joseph wood lid one, but it's expensive (I'm sure mine was cheap from Costco, I'd never pay £50 for a bread bin) I think the wood lid helps with humidity.As for flour, I tend to use the premium mill ground variety, Bacheldre or Shipton Mill usually, from experience the flours ground by water mill seem to be better, but that might be luck. I tend to buy 16-25kg sacks to keep the cost down. Yeast - I always use Doves Farm, I've got a Lakeland within walking distance so easy to get from their, doesn't seem to be any more expensive than a supermarket.If you're cooking in a utility room, you may find the bread rises less, so during the colder months, where the utility room is often sub 10 degrees C, I add an extra half teaspoon of yeast.The cost of a load works out at roughly the price of a good sliced loaf, since it's a whole lot better, it's worth it, plus throw in a few sesame, pumpkin or sunflower (hulled) seeds and you've baked a loaf of artisan bread, and saved yourself a packet.My machine makes 3 or 4 loaves a week and usually a pizza dough and has done for 5+ years. I tend to use the machine for loaves, although the dough cycles are great if busy, I prefer to use my mother-in-laws 40 year old Kenwood chef, to prepare dough for oven cooking, which in my opinion makes for a better roll.Don't be afraid to use the fast bake either, with some flours I've found the 3 hour fast bake produces a better loaf, than the standard 5 hour wholemeal.Also, rather than have tall slices, I cut the loaf in half top to bottom, then slice each half from one end, this way you have better sized slices for toasting.If my bread machine packed in, I'd be thinking about a replacement immediately, though thankfully I do have a spare. In my house only the fridge and freezer are more important.mike



​Sir you truly are the Yoda of bread machine baking. hats off.
I have an older version which has been used every week for a few years. It is fab!

Am tempted to buy this one as it has extra features and keep my old as a spare, or lend it to my mum ;o)

Pity it is not the white version though.
Cristiano

What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit … What other accessories would people suggest that makes their lives a bit easier with the machine? Wire rack or tins? Storage containers?



Once you get your quantities down a large tupperware that the lid locks on is really handy. I found that the most time consuming part of making a loaf was getting all the ingredients (flour, sugar, milk powder, salt, yeast) so I multiply the quantities by 6, pop them all in the tupperware and give it a good shake to mix it up. Then to make a loaf of bread you just need to pour the water in the bread pan, add a dash of oil and put in your bread mixture. Makes an easy process a bit easier.
StuaarrtG

Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of in … Will I save any money in throwing £80 odd at a bread-maker… on top of ingredients and 4 hours worth of electricity?Not hating … but genuinely interested, I would love to buy it if I could justify the cost



I haven't done exact calculations, but I think you save money. Flour, yeast, oil, sugar, salt are all cheap. I add pumpkin, sunflower and poppy seeds which are a bit more expensive but worth it. The bread is really good quality and fresh bread can make a simple meal something special.
pibpob

I find the only thing you need is a measuring scale, because a measuring … I find the only thing you need is a measuring scale, because a measuring spoon and a measuring cup are provided, and you simply put the bread pan on the scales and tip weighed ingredients straight in.Also, there's no need to wash the bread pan - the few crumbs left over after the loaf is tipped out will just be harmlessly incorporated into the next one.Interesting to hear you find that it can't regulate its temperature properly in very cold rooms. My kitchen doesn't get quite that cold.Bread maker bread does go stale very quickly - it's the price you pay for it being so fresh to begin with. I leave a loaf uncovered for a day to keep the crust crispy and then after that cover it loosely to stop it drying out too much.I do find the rectangular shape of these machines annoying, because when sitting on a worktop you can't open the lid without it hitting wall cupboards. Their old squarer design was more sensible. Fortunately I've got somewhere to keep it permanently where this isn't an issue. The measuring cup and spoon live inside it - once it's cool!



Good point about the measuring equipment, mine all got put away in the loft when it arrived, because I do a lot of cooking, I never used them.

I prefer to wash the pan, because you put the dry ingredients in first, the paddle is potentially going to have hard, crisp and dried bread stuck to it, this has the potential to scratch the pan, whether it does I don't know - I've always cleaned it. Mine is scratched anyway from using linseeds, sesame seeds etc.

I've had 7 bread machines in my time, and the Panasonic is the only one with no foibles. My first was a £300 Hinari bought around 1995, I know because the Argos it came from was next door to a Texas Homecare, they've been gone a long time.

The one thing that is noticeable about the Panasonic, is the length of cooking time, the 'rapid' bake is the same time as the standard bake on my last none Panasonic - it's worth the wait. It's a shame they don't make twin paddle versions, my old Morphy Richards made great shaped loaves, because of this, but since 'discovering' the technique of cutting the loaf in half, it's more or less mitigated.

mike
Anyone have any thoughts on it not having the yeast dispenser?
Previously, I had considered one of these Panasonics, due to the timer function.
Anyone confirm that dumping the yeast in at the same time produces a decent loaf when using the timer function?
jan81

Once you get your quantities down a large tupperware that the lid locks … Once you get your quantities down a large tupperware that the lid locks on is really handy. I found that the most time consuming part of making a loaf was getting all the ingredients (flour, sugar, milk powder, salt, yeast) so I multiply the quantities by 6, pop them all in the tupperware and give it a good shake to mix it up. Then to make a loaf of bread you just need to pour the water in the bread pan, add a dash of oil and put in your bread mixture. Makes an easy process a bit easier.


Good idea, unless you're using the timer, as the yeast has to be kept away from the water. In that case, just exclude the yeast from the mixture.
dvdvicar

Anyone have any thoughts on it not having the yeast dispenser?Previously, … Anyone have any thoughts on it not having the yeast dispenser?Previously, I had considered one of these Panasonics, due to the timer function.Anyone confirm that dumping the yeast in at the same time produces a decent loaf when using the timer function?

It's not a yeast dispenser, it's a seed and nut dispenser for when you need to add those after the kneading. So yes, just put the yeast in first, then all the dry ingredients, then the water, and it will work fine on the timer. You don't need the dispenser model for this.
dvdvicar

Anyone have any thoughts on it not having the yeast dispenser?Previously, … Anyone have any thoughts on it not having the yeast dispenser?Previously, I had considered one of these Panasonics, due to the timer function.Anyone confirm that dumping the yeast in at the same time produces a decent loaf when using the timer function?


works great. I put yeast first, cover with flour and then everything else. Never had an issue
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