Parkside SDS 1050W Hammer Drill with 5 bits, depth stop and quick release chuck at LIDL
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Parkside SDS 1050W Hammer Drill with 5 bits, depth stop and quick release chuck at LIDL

£39.99LIDL Deals
37
Found 30th Apr 2016
Summer is coming, your house needs more ventilation. you could open a window, or you could smash a bloody great hole in the wall like this lady. Perfect for cool summer breezes.

Spent years messing around with "percussion drills" trying to drill holes in old walls. Got an SDS and never looked back.

Seems like a good value Kit. Also available are the SDS Bit sets. The three pack 800mm ones are a bargain if you have thick walls and want to run a cabling. Not bosch or makita but great for home use and can't argue with three year warranty (just keep the receipt)

From 5/5/16
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37 Comments
haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power tool . best unplug it and swing it by its lead repeatedly
Lmfao best comment iv read on here ^^^^ X)
I bought one of these from lidl 2 years ago. I'm no pro builder but for some diy this is a fantastic machine for what I want. It was used as a concrete breaker for 3 full days when I was removing a patio. The previous owner of my house decided to use concrete deep enough under the slabs to build a house on! Took a hell of a lot of work and this drill did a fantastic job as a chisel. Also been used to easily drill into hard blue engineering brickwork. If this packed in after the patio job I wouldn't have cared, but it's been great. £40 very well spent.
benezekiel58

haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power … haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power tool . best unplug it and swing it by its lead repeatedly



Perhaps I'm wrong but that wall looks like it's made of some kind of thermal block so to be fair you could cut it with a Stanley knife
I've got an old parkside SDS given it a real tough life- still going strong had a Bosch one clapped out. Heat from me.
In a lovely shade of Bosch green as well.
Perfect if your trying to make Swiss cheese. Not much use on anything solid
prash_2k

Perfect if your trying to make Swiss cheese. Not much use on anything … Perfect if your trying to make Swiss cheese. Not much use on anything solid



You know this from experience?
prash_2k

Perfect if your trying to make Swiss cheese. Not much use on anything … Perfect if your trying to make Swiss cheese. Not much use on anything solid



Bizarrely everyone I know who has used Parkside rates it as a brand very highly!
sufianrahaman

Lmfao best comment iv read on here ^^^^ X)


Parkside's amongst the best brand of power tools I have. Don't expect a miracle with them and they'll see you well.
Parkside are low end Chinese tools imported by Einhell.

This particular tool looks poorly configured as its too low powered for SDS and bulky as a normal drill. A typical issue is it can only use SDS masonry drills the supplied keyless chuck is only for metal and wood drills so you lose the option for using a wide range of standard masonry drill bits. Power wise 3 joules compares very badly with something like this at Screwfix for £50.

http://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb278sds-5kg-sds-drill-230-240v/97533

Which offers 8 joules of force.

The end result is a drill not suitable for typical SDS applications as too weak, not suitable for lighter masonry work as can't take standard masonry drill bits and bulky and awkward for normal drilling. Definitely not great for driving screws either. It's hard to know who this is for, maybe as shown a SDS drill for women and the elderly who can't physically hold a normal strength SDS drill but need to do some very light breaking. Is it really worth saving £10 over a proper SDS drill at Screwfix with a huge number of very positive reviews for what is a very limited product.

No mention of a safety clutch either so not recommended for use with core drills which is a common use for SDS drills.

Looks like it has a large reverse switch just above the trigger switch which is probably a give away that this is more standard hammer drill with a SDS chuck fitted rather than dedicated SDS drill design which often don't have reverse.
Edited by: "bonzobanana" 1st May 2016
I bought one of these a couple of years ago,done major diy and still going strong.
I always pick up park side tools now with warranty and quality I don't think you can beat
I think that these are quite heavy.
Thinking about taking down my garden wall, I would guess 30 ft long and 2 foot high, will this do the job?
I did think about hiring a kango, I hired one many years ago, they are heavy but very powerful / forcefull, but there again it would probably cost £30 for the day, so if this will do it I might as well go for this
stevec59

I think that these are quite heavy.Thinking about taking down my garden … I think that these are quite heavy.Thinking about taking down my garden wall, I would guess 30 ft long and 2 foot high, will this do the job?I did think about hiring a kango, I hired one many years ago, they are heavy but very powerful / forcefull, but there again it would probably cost £30 for the day, so if this will do it I might as well go for this



I think a sledge hammer would be easier and quicker for a garden wall.
Rather listen to the genuine owners reviews with real experience then some theoretical tosh sitting on your sofa without even using one

Great tool does the job well as stated by a few genuine people who have owned one

Thanks op and reviewers !
I'm a builder retired bought one of these about 5 years back best drill iv'e had.Take no notice of the idiots who think paying double or triple this price gets you a better drill.
Is parkside a make now? Always used to be random surplus production from big manufacturers, my jet washer was German and usually 3x the price.

I own several parkside tools and can't fault them.
SteadVex

Bizarrely everyone I know who has used Parkside rates it as a brand very … Bizarrely everyone I know who has used Parkside rates it as a brand very highly!



Really?! I've tried Lidle prower tools in the past and if ur trying to do below avg diy (drill plaster board) no problem. But when u get to a brick wall then it's no good.

If anyone has a video of it doing some of the dirty work I'd love to see it. But I'm not convinced that a tool costing around £60 is made of the same materials as a makita. And as for Bosch et al they are over price tat.

You wouldn't buy a laptop from Cadbury and you would buy a chocolate bar from halford
benezekiel58

haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power … haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power tool . best unplug it and swing it by its lead repeatedly


I'm guessing you know as much about this as you do about posting deals! All mouth...................
ellbee

Parkside's amongst the best brand of power tools I have. Don't expect a … Parkside's amongst the best brand of power tools I have. Don't expect a miracle with them and they'll see you well.



What else do you have? A shoe horn for a jack hammer and a motorised spanner as a screw driver?

I know people will buy what they can afford. But you wouldn't buy a chocolate bar from makita and you wouldn't buy a drill from Cadbury.

So why would you trust a cheaply made product made from poor quality material to accurately drill through the most expensive thing you own... YOUR HOUSE!

Save up eat a few less cakes and get a real drill that will last and will do the job! If you wanna play around, I just brought my nephew a bob the builder tool set for £19.99 from asda.

Go hard or hire someone
Having said all of that! I'd still rather go for this than the sh*ty Bosch on here for £50 odd
These are great for home use, solid kit that punched holes into reinforced concrete lintels for curtain rails and blinds with ease!
Funnily enough I am using this at the moment to drill through the wall for an outside tap.

Done a great job, I gave up using my cordless Bosch.

Recommended.
benezekiel58

haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power … haha . good luck trying to make a hole like that using a parkside power tool . best unplug it and swing it by its lead repeatedly


You sure that wouldn't just make a hole in the drill.
Where does it says it's an SDS it a hammer drill isn't it????
Original Poster
tariq3877

Where does it says it's an SDS it a hammer drill isn't it????



​you are right it doesn't say SDS but it is supplied with SDS plus bits and chisels and has an impact of 4 joules so looks like it to me.
I had a Parkside drill years ago (they were red then) and it was great got to say it would go through everything I threw at it.
Heat from me
bonzobanana

Parkside are low end Chinese tools imported by Einhell. This particular … Parkside are low end Chinese tools imported by Einhell. This particular tool looks poorly configured as its too low powered for SDS and bulky as a normal drill. A typical issue is it can only use SDS masonry drills the supplied keyless chuck is only for metal and wood drills so you lose the option for using a wide range of standard masonry drill bits. Power wise 3 joules compares very badly with something like this at Screwfix for £50.http://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb278sds-5kg-sds-drill-230-240v/97533Which offers 8 joules of force.The end result is a drill not suitable for typical SDS applications as too weak, not suitable for lighter masonry work as can't take standard masonry drill bits and bulky and awkward for normal drilling. Definitely not great for driving screws either. It's hard to know who this is for, maybe as shown a SDS drill for women and the elderly who can't physically hold a normal strength SDS drill but need to do some very light breaking. Is it really worth saving £10 over a proper SDS drill at Screwfix with a huge number of very positive reviews for what is a very limited product. No mention of a safety clutch either so not recommended for use with core drills which is a common use for SDS drills. Looks like it has a large reverse switch just above the trigger switch which is probably a give away that this is more standard hammer drill with a SDS chuck fitted rather than dedicated SDS drill design which often don't have reverse.



Too low powered for SDS?

And there's me thinking it looked like it might be a little on the heavy side, and a lighter weight, lower powered one might be better choice for most jobs (other than heavy breaking or core drills).

I use a 500w (2.4 Joules or there abouts) Wickes branded (possibly made by AEG) one bought some years ago. I've used it to sink socket boxes, chase out the walls for cables and drill countless holes and we have a lot of the dense concrete block, hard brick and even what appeared to be concrete lintels used up in the internal walls, even the bricks used in the external walls are harder than normal. I virtually destroyed a normal impact drill and completely wrecked a chuck and sometimes had to resort to a lump hammer and star bit chisel before getting an SDS

The only thing it struggled on was breaking up a thick concrete base with a 2" wide chisel bit, for which I resorted to using a large sds bit to drill lots of holes as it was considerably quicker and the bit being much longer saved bending down as much.


My wickes one has a reverse switch and it most definitely is electo-pneumatic, it has come in handy in the rare occasion that I've got a bit stuck by not clearing the dust.

I'd be surprised if this one doesn't have a safety chuck even though it doesn't mention one. I'd agree they are important - I've used a very old sds that didn't have one and the bit jammed while working up a ladder, fortunately I didn't lose my balance when it yanked itself out of my hand.


Anyway :- This appears to be product details:- http://www.lidl-service.com/cps/rde/SID-25C1CABD-310D8C3A/lsp/hs.xsl/product.html?id=160312033&rdeLocaleAttr=en&title=HAMMER%20DRILL%20PBH%201050%20B2

and the manual:- lidl-service.com/sta…pdf

Edited by: "melted" 2nd May 2016
melted

Too low powered for SDS? And there's me thinking it looked like it might … Too low powered for SDS? And there's me thinking it looked like it might be a little on the heavy side, and a lighter weight, lower powered one might be better choice for most jobs (other than heavy breaking or core drills). I use a 500w (2.4 Joules or there abouts) Wickes branded (possibly made by AEG) one bought some years ago. I've used it to sink socket boxes, chase out the walls for cables and drill countless holes and we have a lot of the dense concrete block, hard brick and even what appeared to be concrete lintels used up in the internal walls, even the bricks used in the external walls are harder than normal. I virtually destroyed a normal impact drill and completely wrecked a chuck and sometimes had to resort to a lump hammer and star bit chisel before getting an SDSThe only thing it struggled on was breaking up a thick concrete base with a 2" wide chisel bit, for which I resorted to using a large sds bit to drill lots of holes as it was considerably quicker and the bit being much longer saved bending down as much. My wickes one has a reverse switch and it most definitely is electo-pneumatic, it has come in handy in the rare occasion that I've got a bit stuck by not clearing the dust. I'd be surprised if this one doesn't have a safety chuck even though it doesn't mention one. I'd agree they are important - I've used a very old sds that didn't have one and the bit jammed while working up a ladder, fortunately I didn't lose my balance when it yanked itself out of my hand. Anyway :- This appears to be product details:- http://www.lidl-service.com/cps/rde/SID-25C1CABD-310D8C3A/lsp/hs.xsl/product.html?id=160312033&rdeLocaleAttr=en&title=HAMMER%20DRILL%20PBH%201050%20B2and the manual:- http://www.lidl-service.com/static/160312033/273100_EN.pdf



It really depends on your usage but this products seems poorly configured in many ways. It's SDS but its not suitable for typical SDS breaking, core drills or very long SDS masonry bits so it limits its functionality. However ok for lighter SDS breaking but there is only £10 difference between tools far more capable for SDS uses.

Clearly not good as a typical wood, metal or screw driving function either because you have to use a chuck adapter making the tool bulky and cumbersome.

For light masonry drilling you can't use standard masonry drill bits so not great for shelving and minor masonry work.

As ever it depends on your main use. There is a huge difference between 3 and 8 joules force.

The Wickes drill same as AEG statment may well be correct as the Hong Kong company that owns the AEG power tool brand also supplies to shops but that doesn't mean the Wickes drill represents AEG quality of old. They are all fairly low end nowadays. The same company makes the poor Hoover vacuum cleaners and Power Devil brands etc. It's fairly low price stuff but doesn't mean it isn't fit for purpose.

This Parkside tool is a typical marketing led product. It ticks all the right boxes as versatile and low price with a stylish design but the end result for many will be a tool not ideal or suitable for their needs. Too weak for many SDS uses and too strong and unsuitable as a standard hammer drill because it can not take standard masonry bits and the chuck adapter will move forward and back in the sds chuck which makes it inferior to use over standard hammer drills. Two poor drills combined into one mediocre drill destined to annoy many of its owners.
Original Poster
bonzobanana

It really depends on your usage but this products seems poorly configured … It really depends on your usage but this products seems poorly configured in many ways. It's SDS but its not suitable for typical SDS breaking, core drills or very long SDS masonry bits so it limits its functionality. However ok for lighter SDS breaking but there is only £10 difference between tools far more capable for SDS uses.Clearly not good as a typical wood, metal or screw driving function either because you have to use a chuck adapter making the tool bulky and cumbersome.For light masonry drilling you can't use standard masonry drill bits so not great for shelving and minor masonry work.As ever it depends on your main use. There is a huge difference between 3 and 8 joules force. The Wickes drill same as AEG statment may well be correct as the Hong Kong company that owns the AEG power tool brand also supplies to shops but that doesn't mean the Wickes drill represents AEG quality of old. They are all fairly low end nowadays. The same company makes the poor Hoover vacuum cleaners and Power Devil brands etc. It's fairly low price stuff but doesn't mean it isn't fit for purpose. This Parkside tool is a typical marketing led product. It ticks all the right boxes as versatile and low price with a stylish design but the end result for many will be a tool not ideal or suitable for their needs. Too weak for many SDS uses and too strong and unsuitable as a standard hammer drill because it can not take standard masonry bits and the chuck adapter will move forward and back in the sds chuck which makes it inferior to use over standard hammer drills. Two poor drills combined into one mediocre drill destined to annoy many of its owners.



​why would you want to use standard masonry bits?
As i said great drill ignore the clueless idiots who have never owned one.
macgyvers child

​why would you want to use standard masonry bits?




Beats me. Replaced all mine with Bosch sds bits, and still using the same ones I bought 16+ years ago, I don't think I've even had to sharpen any of them despite being well used. They were pretty cheap too. Standard masonry bits aren't really suited for use with a sds drill as their spiral isn't coarse enough or deep enough so they're more likely to jam. Besides who wants to waste time tightening bits in a chuck which will also probably wear out after a few years due to the hammer impacts.
I've had a parkside drill for years and for diy jobs it's perfectly adequate
Hot from me, I bought one a couple of years ago and it's had some serious abuse, being used virtually as a tradesmans tool during a complete house renovation. Still going as strong as on day 1!

http://i65.tinypic.com/wjc57m.jpg
I have a standard hammer drill, quite heavy and powerful, which won't touch some jobs that my 2 Kg SDS drill breezes through. You really don't need a 6Kgs drill for straightforward drilling jobs, and it's a strain to hold one one-handed above your head - maybe not for the body-builders here, but it is for the normal blokes.


macgyvers child

​why would you want to use standard masonry bits?



Greater range, smaller sizes, lower prices. Other speciality drill bits. You'll find a wide range of non-sds masonry drill bits by many top brands. Also not forgetting a normal chuck gives you better control over wood and metal drill bits without the chuck adapter moving back and forth in the sds chuck. You can make cleaner holes. Saying that definitely the strength of this product is as a masonry drill no question its just it falls short as a standard drill or a SDS breaker for most uses.
bonzobanana

Greater range, smaller sizes, lower prices. Other speciality drill bits. … Greater range, smaller sizes, lower prices. Other speciality drill bits. You'll find a wide range of non-sds masonry drill bits by many top brands. Also not forgetting a normal chuck gives you better control over wood and metal drill bits without the chuck adapter moving back and forth in the sds chuck. You can make cleaner holes. Saying that definitely the strength of this product is as a masonry drill no question its just it falls short as a standard drill or a SDS breaker for most uses.



SDS masonry bits go down to about 4.5mm, and I can't think of a use for one smaller than that, and I find the bits out last conventional masonry bits.

You can get all sorts of speciality SDS bits from wood augers and wood chisels, to bits to cut a rectangular hole for a socket.

An SDS drill is primarily for masonry, I agree the length and weight of the drill and movement of chuck adaptors in standard sds drills make them less than ideal when used with standard twist bits,

My preference for a wood/metal drill when a pillar drill is not an option is one without hammer action, no percussion mechanism makes them shorter, lighter, more compact and easier to handle. If I want to drill anything harder than breeze block, it is usually quicker to go get the SDS than use a conventional percussion drill, and if you hit something hard you may not progress at all with a percussion drill.

You can get true dual purpose SDS drills with a removable SDS chuck. AEG for example used to do one with a really compact body, it had a fixtec chuck system so you could remove the sds chuck and fit a standard keyless one with no slop in it, you could also detach the rear handle and hold it by the slim perpendicular motor unit allowing it to be used in really tight spaces. I was tempted to buy one, but two drills were cheaper and generally more convenient.as you didn't have to swap bits/chucks.

Edited by: "melted" 4th May 2016
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