Peugeot 208 3 year lease £153.00 pm £4859.64 @ Contract Hire & Leasing
190°Expired

Peugeot 208 3 year lease £153.00 pm £4859.64 @ Contract Hire & Leasing

81
Found 25th Jun 2015
Looking for a new car for the wife. This seems like a decent deal.

I'm new to leasing... Would be interested in your thoughts.

£129.99 per month but works out at £153 per month after initial rental and fees.

Ps pic is illustration, not the colour of the car you get.

Shared Via The HUKD App For Android.

81 Comments

Original Poster

Probably should have said... it's the 1.2 VTi Active 5Dr model.

£153 for 3 years sounds about right for a Pug.

it's French. had nothing but problems with every French c

problems with French cars

Good price in my opinion I got a 3dr 62reg 15months ago and pay £171 per month. I didn't go out looking to buy that day but feel in love compared to my old banger lol.

French petrols are generally ok, it's the diesels that can be problematic.

Nice to see three year deals with average miles, makes it fairer when compared to buying new.

Suppose its ok for lease crap car .. at least you can give it back

oddballjamie

French petrols are generally ok, it's the diesels that can be problematic.


Sorry - But have to disagree. Pug diesels are excellent. I've had several pugs (both petrol and diesel), and never had any significant problems with any of them. Renault on the other hand ... welll that's a different story. Not had a Citroen. Of course, none are up in the BMW & Audi class.

Spango

Sorry - But have to disagree. Pug diesels are excellent. I've had … Sorry - But have to disagree. Pug diesels are excellent. I've had several pugs (both petrol and diesel), and never had any significant problems with any of them. Renault on the other hand ... welll that's a different story. Not had a Citroen. Of course, none are up in the BMW & Audi class.



Just google the 1.6hdi, chocolate engine, I had the 2.0hdi 136 (from 2 years old) for a spell and it cost me a small fortune to keep on the road.

Pre-2004 PSA diesels were great and I hear 2011 onwards are less of a problem, the ones in-between are just plain awful.

I have this car currently (15 months so far) and I love it, no issues at all. Mine is leased too, first time. Before that I'd get a second hand one on finance, then fall out with it before the finance was up, so trade it in for something a bit newer, so I always had a monthly payment. Now I pay less each month to lease a brand new car, and get another brand new car when the lease is up (by which time I'll no doubt be ready for a change lol), it makes more sense.

oddballjamie

Just google the 1.6hdi, chocolate engine, I had the 2.0hdi 136 (from 2 … Just google the 1.6hdi, chocolate engine, I had the 2.0hdi 136 (from 2 years old) for a spell and it cost me a small fortune to keep on the road.Pre-2004 PSA diesels were great and I hear 2011 onwards are less of a problem, the ones in-between are just plain awful.


Yes, maybe - I'm not contesting your experience at all, just giving mine. Not sure about the '1.6hdi, chocolate engine' engine. I've currently got a 5008 1.6 petrol, and a 308 1.6HDi. No problems with any of the above, and have previously owned a 205 petrol, 106 petrol, 306 GTI-6 petrol. Mebbe I've just been lucky.
I've had one a renault grand scenic 1.9 DCi from new, and that was nothing but hell on wheels: Top of the range model. All window mechanims failed within 2 years, blew 5 turbos in 5 years (and took Renault Technical Services 3 years to find the cause), and a rubber engine mount failed within 1.5yrs (expected lifedspan!). Plus several other 'minor' issues.
The service I got from the Renault dealer I used was second to none, but the car itself was pure gilded cr*p.

oddballjamie

Just google the 1.6hdi, chocolate engine, I had the 2.0hdi 136 (from 2 … Just google the 1.6hdi, chocolate engine, I had the 2.0hdi 136 (from 2 years old) for a spell and it cost me a small fortune to keep on the road.Pre-2004 PSA diesels were great and I hear 2011 onwards are less of a problem, the ones in-between are just plain awful.


Agree wholeheartedly. Had 2006 diesel - nightmare and very expensive to keep on the road. Now have 2010 Galaxy diesel......

Look on first vehicle leasing op?? Sometimes have specials on

Can I ask all you lease people, what happens when you return your/their car back to the company?? Who pays for any curbed wheel damage, trolley dints, 4x4 bumps in tesco car park when the guilty lady fails to leave details???

Have you been left with a big refurb bill

pop5

Agree wholeheartedly. Had 2006 diesel - nightmare and very expensive to … Agree wholeheartedly. Had 2006 diesel - nightmare and very expensive to keep on the road. Now have 2010 Galaxy diesel......



You know the Peugeot 1.6 hdi diesel is also used in a lot of Ford's sold as the duratorq, it's the same engine made in the same factory! a joint venture power plant.. The same as the 1.6 thp petrol is used in the BMW mini Cooper, another joint venture.. I've had both in a variety of Peugeots and never had an issue, maybe I'm just lucky, although it's seems to be the trend to bash Peugeots.

Banned

zippypants

Suppose its ok for lease crap car .. at least you can give it back



A highly considered, in-depth technical and, at the same time, emotional review of this motor car.... why Chris Evans for Top Gear? when the producers needed to look no further than HUKD..............

Banned

chrisf74

Can I ask all you lease people, what happens when you return your/their … Can I ask all you lease people, what happens when you return your/their car back to the company?? Who pays for any curbed wheel damage, trolley dints, 4x4 bumps in tesco car park when the guilty lady fails to leave details???Have you been left with a big refurb bill




I have leased since 1999 and only on one occasion have had what I would call an excessive bill for damage. There were a few scratches and scuffs on the vehicle, but nothing overly serious. I got a bill for nearly £800. I called them and was emailed pictures of the damage. The images were unclear and whilst I accepted a few of them, the others were not clearly visible in the pictures. I told them there is no way I'm paying £800 and was caught off guard when the chap on the phone said 'how much do you want to pay'?....I blurted out £200 and he said 'OK'........wish I'd tried less.

I have had a few little 'dings and scratches' on all the cars I've had, but these have never been charged for. My wife did drag the rear wing of a Qashqai down a post, scraping the wing and door, but to avoid the companies high end repair prices, I got one of those mobile blokes out and had it all repaired for £150.
Edited by: "copthis1" 26th Jun 2015

mervs

You know the Peugeot 1.6 hdi diesel is also used in a lot of Ford's sold … You know the Peugeot 1.6 hdi diesel is also used in a lot of Ford's sold as the duratorq, it's the same engine made in the same factory! a joint venture power plant.. The same as the 1.6 thp petrol is used in the BMW mini Cooper, another joint venture.. I've had both in a variety of Peugeots and never had an issue, maybe I'm just lucky, although it's seems to be the trend to bash Peugeots.


I am aware Ford and Citroen used the same diesel engine (mainly the Focus mk2), they also had many problems with it. It's actually that troublesome, many used car dealers won't touch it.

oddballjamie

French petrols are generally ok, it's the diesels that can be problematic.

. A lot of car manufacturers take the Peugeot diesel engine and put their efficiency electronics on it.... Ford did this for years with their Tdci engines which originated from a Peugeot vlock

Spango

Yes, maybe - I'm not contesting your experience at all, just giving mine. … Yes, maybe - I'm not contesting your experience at all, just giving mine. Not sure about the '1.6hdi, chocolate engine' engine. I've currently got a 5008 1.6 petrol, and a 308 1.6HDi. No problems with any of the above, and have previously owned a 205 petrol, 106 petrol, 306 GTI-6 petrol. Mebbe I've just been lucky.I've had one a renault grand scenic 1.9 DCi from new, and that was nothing but hell on wheels: Top of the range model. All window mechanims failed within 2 years, blew 5 turbos in 5 years (and took Renault Technical Services 3 years to find the cause), and a rubber engine mount failed within 1.5yrs (expected lifedspan!). Plus several other 'minor' issues.The service I got from the Renault dealer I used was second to none, but the car itself was pure gilded cr*p.


I was actually defending the petrols, I had a Xsara Coupe for best part of five years and the only thing to go wrong was a pin hole in a fuel line. We currently have a petrol C3 as a second car and it's been fine.

mikeydalby

. A lot of car manufacturers take the Peugeot diesel engine and put their … . A lot of car manufacturers take the Peugeot diesel engine and put their efficiency electronics on it.... Ford did this for years with their Tdci engines which originated from a Peugeot vlock



Think it was more turbo and Eolys/dpf fluid issues. Mine certainly was anyway.

I've had my Renault scenic for three years now with no problems. It's a 1.6 petrol 07 plate. I was expecting some issues after telling people I had purchased 1 but my next door neighbour has had more trouble with his bmw lol. I only purchased it for a runaround but its grown on me big time. I'm going to run it in the ground and when it dies on me I'll put it on eBay auction at 99p. I do get tempted by these deals because it's nice to have a new car but I just couldn't sleep at night knowing it could get damage done to it by a jealous person. (You know who you are lol)

Well, it might be a bit early before the lease-haters arrive, but what the heck, I'll insert my new two-part guide for anyone that needs some help:

A Brief Guide to Personal Lease Deals
Leasing a car is a very hot topic on HUKD. There are a lot of lease deals that make it “hot” on HUKD, but there are a lot of negative connotations and/or misconceptions from both benefits and negatives of leasing. If you’re not ready for a long read let’s take an approach for tldr;

“These deals get hot for a reason, which is usually that the total payments over the term, are less than what the car will depreciate over the same time, if you bought it outright. If you don't understand this, don’t post silly comments – try instead to use that time to understand why the deal is considered hot.”

What is a vehicle lease?
A lease is a financing method to get you into a new car. There are other options of owning/driving vehicles, but this guide refers to leasing new vehicles, which is what most car deals on here are about. Note that it is a legal contract in which a person enters into.

You pay a deposit (flexible) and fixed monthly payment, in order to drive the vehicle, over a set period of time (agreed at the start of the lease). You will agree a mileage per annum and likely incur a charge per mile, if this is exceeded. Some deals will include servicing, tyres and breakdown. Some, do not.
After the set period expires, you simply hand the car back and walk away.

What about business leasing?
That’s a bit more complicated. Refer to your firm’s accountant or fleet manager for more information – business leases (ex VAT pricing) can appear very attractive, but come with some other more complex calculations as part of the legal requirements. Most deals on HUKD refer to personal leases, so this is not covered.

Leasing sounds like a waste of money – who leases a car?!
Lots of people lease cars, because for them, it is efficient. Some lease because it suits their current requirements. Other people may lease a car because of perceived status of being seen in a new car, if you believe everything you read. It’s best to consider some worked examples to understand better.

People who have a lump sum of cash – enough to buy a car outright – may consider leasing a car instead. It depends on how long they intend to keep the vehicle for and whether the lease options work for them.

People who have company car allowances, often find that personal leasing opens up better options than their respective company car schemes and allows a change more frequently.

There are many reasons as to why someone would choose to lease a car, but the take-away from this ultimately is: if it’s not right for you, doesn’t mean that it’s not right for everyone.

Cynic’s corner (aka the narrow minded): “People who want to be flashy but don’t have enough money to afford a car are the only people who lease cars. These people are shallow and try to “keep up with the Jones’s” and will get themselves into financial ruin, because they are too poor to buy a car normally.”

Response: Rubbish. While there are obviously people who will buy all sorts of goods for outward perception, there are plenty more who don’t.

That still sounds like wasted money though. Why would anyone lease when you don’t get to own the car and keep it?
There are many advantages to leasing a new car, some require examples to explain, but others are more obvious.
The most obvious is depreciation. Sadly, cars depreciate - over time, they are worth less. The more miles they have done, the less they generally tend to be worth. Same for outright age. Same for general condition.

All of these things combined, contribute to a perceived worth of the vehicle. This isn’t set in stone, but a lot of people (accountants!) work to one of three methods:
Straight line depreciation (i.e. book value of £20k, depreciate 20% per year over 5 years – whatever it sells for at the end is a bonus)
Reducing/declining balance depreciation (i.e. £20k at purchase less 30% after year 1 = (20-6=£14k); after year two = (14-4.2=9.8k) and so on)
• Market value (i.e. manually revalue your asset based on what the market will be prepared to pay – this is influenced by supply and demand)

The reality is that the third option and a mix of the first two, will be used by lease companies, in order to work out what a vehicle will be worth in the future. It’s open to a number of variables, but is a guide at least.

Let’s try a worked example on a fictitious car that costs £20,000 to buy outright. This car has been serviced properly, is in good working order and has average mileage on the clock. The alternative lease term is a 9+23 deal at £203 per month with £150 admin fee.
Cost today: £20,000
Market value in 2 years: £12,000
Depreciation amount: £8,000 / 40% (or 20% per annum if you like)
Lease payments total: £6,650 (9x£203 deposit + 23x£203 monthly payments +£150 admin fee = £6,646 rounded up to £6,650)

If the lease deal you’re looking at, over the same time period, is less than the £8,000 on the same fictitious car (which our example is!), there are some efficiencies to be had. These are numerous and not limited to:

1. Assuming you bought the car outright, you have tied up £20k of cash in a depreciating asset, which is cash that could otherwise earn some interest in an ISA or equivalent savings account. It may be modest, but it is also essentially cash in hand – which is a very valuable asset.
2. Owned outright or leased, the car will depreciate. In this lease, you are paying less than the car will likely depreciate, which is efficient. If the amount you will pay is MORE than what the expected depreciation is likely to be, then the lease deal may not be efficient.
3. In two years, there may be negotiations involved, in selling the car you own outright. Some people may get a better deal than others, but a lease deal is simple: you hand it back.
4. The lease option allows you to take the cash-flow approach and manage your payments monthly, instead of up-front cash. This is useful for people who are able to afford the monthly payments, but don’t have the cash to hand right now. This is likely the case for most people, be it in the form of car allowances paid monthly, or disposable income from a salary/pay cheque etc.
New cars and higher RRSP cars depreciate faster than used cars, because of the “percentage” methods above! As a result, used cars can often appear as a great deal, but more on that later.



Edited by: "cactusbrandy" 26th Jun 2015

Here are some general pros to leasing:
• You get in to a new car
• Can be cheaper than buying new (depreciation concept)
• You benefit from not paying the initial registration fee/tax
• Vehicle excise duty is not your responsibility
• If the car is kept for under three years, there are no MOTs to worry about
• Leased cars spread costs out over the term of the lease. This is basic cash-flow. This is fundamental to business and life in general. Smooth cash flow, means a smooth life. No bottle-necks or lump sums.
• The lump sum up front is flexible in the deposit, but not the full amount of the car. It can be as low as one monthly payment or as high as 12 payments and upwards.
• New cars have a perception of being “more reliable” and will be covered under at least a three year manufacturer warranty.
• You have the perceived benefits of a new car: technology, safety, comfort, reliability.
• The agreement/contract is not secured (i.e. you won’t lose your house, like you could if you stopped paying the mortgage).
• Some deals include maintenance (servicing, tyres etc) as part of the package deal.
• Cosmetic damage is covered by BVRLA guidelines, which is fair and not unreasonable.

Here are some general cons to leasing:
• You will enter into a legally binding contract.
• If you cannot afford the monthly payments, you will be at risk of damaging your credit score.
• You need to have fully-comprehensive insurance or face a potential shortfall upon write-off.
• If your car is written off during the lease term, you may be at risk if the payments outstanding are greater than the pay-out from insurance; you’d need to purchase gap insurance to cover this shortfall.
• Many lease companies stipulate that the tyres you put on the car, are the same as the factory fit – these can often be very costly compared to your normal favourite quality tyre.
• Mercedes (and potentially others) may stipulate that you MUST use a Mercedes garage for servicing; you otherwise find that you must use genuine manufacturer parts/liquids as part of the annual/periodic service in order to meet the terms of the lease agreement.
• If your lease payments are very high, you might not get the efficiencies that many experience and you could be out of pocket compared to other methods of obtaining a vehicle to drive.
• If you don’t like the car, you’re tied into a contract and may find the release clause to be expensive.
• Some insurance companies don’t appropriately handle the registered owner being a lease firm, with the registered keeper being you, the driver (most are fine, however).
• Your mileage is limited to what is agreed at the start of the lease, though there may be a fee per excess mile (usually between 5p-10p per mile – be aware that many firms don’t quote this figure including VAT).
• If you really like the car, there is not likely to be an option to purchase it.
• There may be additional administration charges that are not immediately clear at first.
• You are required to be credit checked – if you have poor credit, you may not be approved for a lease.
• If you don’t look after the car, severe dents/scratches *may* be charged for.

Here are some general neutrals to leasing:
• You still need to insure the vehicle.
• The car will still need to be looked after as if it is your own.
• Your car will need to be serviced and maintained as if it was your own (log book stamps etc)
• In a >3 year lease, you will need to pay for MOTs
• In a >3 year lease or where manufacturer warranty expires during the lease, faults will need to be repaired by you

Okay, I sort of see where you’re going with this. Why not get a bank loan and buy outright or do a PCP deal?
A bank loan is a viable alternative to leasing, if you wish to own the car for longer than a lease agreement will allow. This works well for people who want to own over 5+ years and may not have the cash to hand right now, but know that future cash flow leaves them at risk.

With a bank loan, there is interest to pay. This can vary between banks and is also dependent on the base rate set by the Bank of England. Right now, some loans are quite attractive. In a year or two, they may not. It’s a risk you face, sadly.

Otherwise, you could also consider a PCP deal, which is similar to leasing, but gives people the option of buying the car at the end, as well as giving it back. Sometimes, it may also be possible to trade for another vehicle and maintain the same monthly payments. PCP often requires sizeable up-front cash sums (greater than a lease!) and will also have a finance charge involved on the finance taken out.

So why not just buy second hand and own outright?
This is the age-old argument to most of the vehicle lease deals that are posted here. Let’s start with the obvious.

• This is for a new car deal, not a used car deal
• You don’t go on to a deal for apples and say “cold, oranges are cheaper” (after all, both are still fruit – same thing – right?!)

But let’s entertain the concept for a minute, because some people may be undecided about new vs used.

Used cars can be a bargain, but at the same time, they can be a big risk. We’ve pretty much all had a used car and have a bunch of different anecdotal stories about good and bad examples of said cars.

Here are some general pros to buying used:
• You get more choice of used vehicles, with more varied specifications
• Mileage is only limited to what you have agreed with your insurance company (but is otherwise unlimited)
• You can sell the car on at any time
• You can make modifications to the car if you see fit to do so
• Cash sums involved are much less (in most cases)
• Depreciation will be smaller in actual terms, though similar in percentage terms to a new car
• The car you buy may run 100% for years and cost you very little before selling on for minimal loss (i.e. equivalent to a fraction of the cost of a lease deal)

Here are some general cons to buying used:
• Older cars will need to be put through an MOT
• As a car ages, the risk of repairs increases the more miles it has done and the older it gets
• If you have significant repair bills, you could end up paying more than a lease deal over the same period of ownership
• The car will still depreciate
• You may only be able to access cars with lower specification equipment and safety features for the money you have available
• The condition of the car (visually/mechanically) may not be easy to establish initially (you have come-back if it’s known about before selling to you however)
• A lump sum is still required (loan or otherwise) and tied up in the car; if the car is broken beyond repair, your money is lost.
• Selling used cars can be a drag, with tyre kickers and people being unrealistic with offers.

There is nothing wrong with buying an older used car. But it is important to remember that buying a car via a lease or outright as used is a financial risk in both instances – it is down to the individual to make this assessment or seek advice before making any commitment.

Golden rules for everyone:
• If you can't afford the payments (lease, loan or PCP), don't do it. This is obvious; this is a general rule of thumb for any financial commitment. Lease deals, like credit cards, are not evil tools of the modern world. They are tools to be made use of, if you know how best to utilise them to their maximum effect.
• If you don't want a NEW car, don't do it. There is no obligation. Nobody is forcing you.
• If you want to take the risks on buying a used car and the associated benefits of it being reliable and costing next to nil to maintain, before selling onwards, don't lease a car.
• If you don't understand leasing, don't do it.
• it is important to remember that buying a car via a lease or outright as used is a financial risk in both instances – it is down to the individual to make this assessment or seek advice before making any commitment

Platinum rules for everyone (take these at face value):
If it appreciates in value, you should seek to BUY IT.
If it depreciates, and it’s efficient to do so, you should seek to RENT IT.
n.b. there are occasional exceptions to the rule. Cars are not really one of those exceptions

If you're still unsure:
Think of a holiday. You spend £2000+. At the end of it, you don't get to keep the hotel to sell on. Nor the swimming pool, aircraft or airport. You have nothing to show for it except a tan (if you're lucky, unlike me). You have, however, had the benefit of enjoyment of that holiday for the time period that you were there.

A car is not dissimilar. You benefit from using the car before parting with it. Lease deals are great for people who want new cars and don't want to tie up vast sums of cold, hard cash up-front.

Edited by: "cactusbrandy" 26th Jun 2015

Very good speech there sir.

adam4007

Very good speech there sir.


I sound like a broken record (albeit very long), but it might just work. Maybe.

I buy cars at the right time of year and wait for the right one to come up at the right price, then haggle it down even more. Then resell at the right time of year, correct any little problems, clean it inside and out and give it a really good polish then hold out for a decent selling price. Always get what I paid for them, sometimes more to cover the cost of advertising it. Easiest one is the older MX-5 in October, sell it in May.

Reliability. There are no unreliable car brands any more (not since TVR stopped making cars). They are all pretty close, even though Honda are usually the best in surveys, even the lowest scoring brands are not actually that far off them. You can find a horror story about every brand of car. You can find anecdotes about impeccable reliability for every brand of car. Some brands of cars can be a bit worse when they get to around 10 years old, but new cars properly serviced are generally excellent regardless of who makes them.

Original Poster

Any views on maintenance packages? For this vehicle it's £25 per month so about £1k over the lease.

Supposed to cover 3 services and probably at least one set of tyres (like for like) so sounds OK to me.

What does everyone else think?

LKBdeals

Any views on maintenance packages? For this vehicle it's £25 per month so … Any views on maintenance packages? For this vehicle it's £25 per month so about £1k over the lease. Supposed to cover 3 services and probably at least one set of tyres (like for like) so sounds OK to me. What does everyone else think?


Expensive in my opinion.

Tyres, on this car should be about £400. Do you think there will be £600 of servicing otherwise? Probably not, but your risk to take. On a two year lease covering the same for a Leon FR, I am paying £15.40 per month to cover two services, breakdown and tyres (and it WILL need a whole set of tyres ), which is £370. That's less than a set of tyres for it...

lovelybeer

Expensive in my opinion. Tyres, on this car should be about £400. Do you … Expensive in my opinion. Tyres, on this car should be about £400. Do you think there will be £600 of servicing otherwise? Probably not, but your risk to take. On a two year lease covering the same for a Leon FR, I am paying £15.40 per month to cover two services, breakdown and tyres (and it WILL need a whole set of tyres ), which is £370. That's less than a set of tyres for it...


I agree not worth it, I didn't take it, had 1 service (as don't do a lot of mileage) so cost me about £160 so far.

Original Poster

natz265

I agree not worth it, I didn't take it, had 1 service (as don't do a lot … I agree not worth it, I didn't take it, had 1 service (as don't do a lot of mileage) so cost me about £160 so far.



Do you not need a service every year regardless of mileage? I thought most cars were annual and the milage limit was there in case that is reached before a year is up?

LKBdeals

Do you not need a service every year regardless of mileage? I thought … Do you not need a service every year regardless of mileage? I thought most cars were annual and the milage limit was there in case that is reached before a year is up?


Most leases will stipulate annual/mileage dependent servicing, as per the log book. Typically, people do annually or every 12'000 miles or so. Some newer cars have longer service intervals, of course!

LKBdeals

Do you not need a service every year regardless of mileage? I thought … Do you not need a service every year regardless of mileage? I thought most cars were annual and the milage limit was there in case that is reached before a year is up?


Nope I was just told as long as I have at least 1 in the 3 years, that's all it needs. Although I may get it done again when the car tells me it needs one just for my own piece of mind

androoski

I buy cars at the right time of year and wait for the right one to come … I buy cars at the right time of year and wait for the right one to come up at the right price, then haggle it down even more. Then resell at the right time of year, correct any little problems, clean it inside and out and give it a really good polish then hold out for a decent selling price. Always get what I paid for them, sometimes more to cover the cost of advertising it. Easiest one is the older MX-5 in October, sell it in May. Reliability. There are no unreliable car brands any more (not since TVR stopped making cars). They are all pretty close, even though Honda are usually the best in surveys, even the lowest scoring brands are not actually that far off them. You can find a horror story about every brand of car. You can find anecdotes about impeccable reliability for every brand of car. Some brands of cars can be a bit worse when they get to around 10 years old, but new cars properly serviced are generally excellent regardless of who makes them.


I've heard that many times before. My argument against it is why pay the VED, insurance and depreciation over the winter on a RWD soft top. Then someone else gets the pleasure in the summer months for not much more.

natz265

Nope I was just told as long as I have at least 1 in the 3 years, that's … Nope I was just told as long as I have at least 1 in the 3 years, that's all it needs. Although I may get it done again when the car tells me it needs one just for my own piece of mind


It's every year on the 208, don't go over too much as they can revoke your warranty.
servicing.peugeot.co.uk/peu…ls/

oddballjamie

It's every year on the 208, don't go over too much as they can revoke … It's every year on the 208, don't go over too much as they can revoke your warranty.http://www.servicing.peugeot.co.uk/peugeot-service-intervals/


It says every year or 12,500 miles on that link. I only have a 6000 a year mileage limit with my lease anyway.

natz265

It says every year or 12,500 miles on that link. I only have a 6000 a … It says every year or 12,500 miles on that link. I only have a 6000 a year mileage limit with my lease anyway.


It's whatever comes first.

oddballjamie

It's whatever comes first.


Its past a year since my last service and my car hasn't told me it needs one yet. Regardless its still cheaper to pay for the service than pay £25 p/m for 3 years

natz265

Its past a year since my last service and my car hasn't told me it needs … Its past a year since my last service and my car hasn't told me it needs one yet. Regardless its still cheaper to pay for the service than pay £25 p/m for 3 years


Your car hasn't told you yet? It isn't a premium model that checks various sensors and adjusts when the next service is due. It just counts the miles since the last service indicator reset, I've had three PSA cars, so I should know.

If it's over a year get it serviced asap incase you need to make a warranty claim. Just call Peugeot if you don't believe me.
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