38°
EXPIRED
Philips 32PFL7562D - 32" Widescreen HD Ready LCD TV - With Pixel Plus 2 & Freeview £459.99
Philips 32PFL7562D - 32" Widescreen HD Ready LCD TV - With Pixel Plus 2 & Freeview £459.99

Philips 32PFL7562D - 32" Widescreen HD Ready LCD TV - With Pixel Plus 2 & Freeview £459.99

Product Features

* Size: 32"
* HD ready
* HDMI
* Aspect ratio: 16:9
* Resolution: 1366 x 768

* Integrated Digital Tuner for DVB-T reception
* HD ready for the highest quality display of HDTV signals
* Pixel Plus 2 HD improves details in standard TV and HDTV
* Dynamic contrast enhancer delivering rich black details
* Digital Natural Motion for smooth moving images
* Virtual Dolby Surround for a cinema-like audio experience
* Compact and slim design that fits in every room
* Matching stand with elegant design included

Technical Details

Colour cabinet: Black glass, 30% gloss
Brightness: 500
Clock: Smart Clock
Loudspeaker types: Dome tweeter
TV system: DVB COFDM 2K/8K
Video Formats: 640 x 480p - 2Fh,720 x 576i - 1Fh,720 x 576p - 2Fh,1280 x 720p - 3Fh,1920 x 1080i - 2Fh,640 x 480i - 1Fh
Output power (RMS): 2x10W
Power consumption: 128
Set Height: 546.5
Multimedia connections: USB (streaming video capable)
Video Playback: SECAM,PAL,NTSC
Built-in speakers: 4
Included Accessories: Table top stand,Power cord,User Manual,Registration card,Warranty certificate,Remote Control,Batteries for remote control
Set Depth: 117.6
Dynamic screen contrast: 7500:1
Playback Formats: Slideshow files (.alb),JPEG Still pictures,MP3,MPEG2
Optional accessories: Floor stand
Standby power consumption: Response time (typical): 8
Sound Enhancement: Digital Signal Processing,Dynamic Bass Enhancement,Graphic Equaliser
Ease of Installation: Auto Program Naming,Automatic Channel Install(ACI),Automatic Tuning System (ATS),Autostore,PLL Digital Tuning,Plug & Play
DVB: DVB Terrestrial *
Ambient temperature: 5 °C to 40 °C
Viewing angle: 176º (H) / 176º (V)
Sound System: Virtual Dolby Digital
Ease of Use: 4 favourite lists,Auto Volume Leveller (AVL),Delta Volume per preset,Graphical User Interface,On Screen Display,Program List,Side Control
Ext 1 Scart: Audio L/R,CVBS in/out,RGB
Electronic Program Guide: Now + Next EPG
Ext 2 Scart: Audio L/R,CVBS in/out,RGB,S-video in
Tuner bands: S-Channel,UHF,VHF,Hyperband
Diagonal screen size (inch): 32
Remote Control: TV
Diagonal screen size (metric): 80
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Remote control type: RACER RC
Display screen type: LCD WXGA Active Matrix TFT
Ext 3: YPbPr
Ext 4: HDMI
Panel resolution: 1366 x 768p
Screen Format Adjustments: 4:3,6 Widescreen Modes,Auto Format,Movie expand 14:9,Movie expand 16:9,Subtitle and Heading Shift,Super Zoom,Widescreen
Picture in Picture: Text dual screen
Ext 5: HDMI
Set width (with stand): 804.9
Picture enhancement: Progressive Scan,Widescreen Plus,Pixel Plus 2 HD,Digital Natural Motion,Dynamic contrast enhancement,3/2 - 2/2 motion pull down,3D Combfilter,Active Control + Light sensor,Active Control,Jagged Line Suppression
Child Protection: Child Lock+Parental Control
Teletext: 1200 page Hypertext
Set height (with stand): 609
Screen enhancement: Anti-Reflection coated screen
Teletext enhancements: Habit Watch,Program information Line
Set depth (with stand): 210
Front / Side connections: Audio L/R in,CVBS in,Headphone out,S-video in,USB
Other connections: Analogue audio Left/Right out,S/PDIF in (coaxial),S/PDIF out (coaxial)
Product weight: 14.4
Product weight (+stand): 22.6
Box width: 877
Aerial Input: 75 ohm coaxial (IEC75)
Box height: 641
Box depth: 267
Weight incl. Packaging: 22.6
VESA wall mount compatible: 200 x 100 mm
VESA Mount: Vesa compliant
Computer formats: 640 x 480, 60Hz,800 x 600, 60Hz,1024 x 768, 60Hz
Mains power: AC 220 - 240 V +/- 10%
Set Width: 804.9

12 Comments

You didn't put the price in

Excellent TV at a good price. Voted hot!! Review here:tech.co.uk/hom…62d

Original Poster

sorry forgot price i have amended. This is my first post can someone explain how i link pictures.

Decent price, but not the best telly for the money.

The 42" inch version of this set reviewed by ]HDTVtest.co.uk....

To me, Philips is a company that has mastered the art of producing flat panels that dazzle in showrooms. When Colin and I started this website back in February 2007, the very first HDTV we went out and buy was the Philips 42PF9831D, because we were so impressed by its picture performance which outshone a Sony W2000 and a Panasonic PX600 flanking it in the Trafford Centre John Lewis AV room.
However, once we brought it back to our test environment, we discovered to our dismay that achieving D65 with the 42PF9831D was more difficult than Pete Doherty quitting drugs. It's a similar story with the 42PFL7662D – Philips appeared to have hardcoded some gamma manipulation and colour decoder deviation designed to make the panel stand out from rival televisions in showrooms... at the expense of colour and greyscale accuracy.
My point is this: some people like this sort of picture, and I can understand why. It's sharp. It's bright. It's vivid. Ultimately you should buy what your eyes prefer, and if cool colour temp floats your boat, the Philips 42PFL7662D deserves some consideration. Having said this, it lacks most of the illustrious technologies that define Philips as a respected flat screen TV manufacturer, so it may be worthwhile waiting for better models arriving later this year that will incorporate Ambilight, Perfect Pixel HD, HD Natural Motion or 100Hz Clear LCD.
If – on the other hand – you appreciate an accurate picture and want to watch a movie the way the director intended it to be watched, then the Philips 42PFL7662D is not for you. In my opinion, this TV is a product that has been hastily slapped together as an afterthought by Philips to jump on the 1080p bandwagon, with poor connectivity and picture quality given its price.

P.S. Back to the Philips 42PF9831D story. We later reviewed the Sony KDL40W2000 and Panasonic TH42PX70 (successor to PX600) on which we achieved D65 greyscale with no colour decoding error fairly easily. Post-calibration, their picture quality simply blew the 42PF9831D away (in the eyes of two D65 zealots of course).




:pirate: CJ :pirate:

cutthroat_jake

Decent price, but not the best telly for the money.The 42" inch version … Decent price, but not the best telly for the money.The 42" inch version of this set reviewed by ]HDTVtest.co.uk.... To me, Philips is a company that has mastered the art of producing flat panels that dazzle in showrooms. When Colin and I started this website back in February 2007, the very first HDTV we went out and buy was the Philips 42PF9831D, because we were so impressed by its picture performance which outshone a Sony W2000 and a Panasonic PX600 flanking it in the Trafford Centre John Lewis AV room. However, once we brought it back to our test environment, we discovered to our dismay that achieving D65 with the 42PF9831D was more difficult than Pete Doherty quitting drugs. It's a similar story with the 42PFL7662D – Philips appeared to have hardcoded some gamma manipulation and colour decoder deviation designed to make the panel stand out from rival televisions in showrooms... at the expense of colour and greyscale accuracy. My point is this: some people like this sort of picture, and I can understand why. It's sharp. It's bright. It's vivid. Ultimately you should buy what your eyes prefer, and if cool colour temp floats your boat, the Philips 42PFL7662D deserves some consideration. Having said this, it lacks most of the illustrious technologies that define Philips as a respected flat screen TV manufacturer, so it may be worthwhile waiting for better models arriving later this year that will incorporate Ambilight, Perfect Pixel HD, HD Natural Motion or 100Hz Clear LCD. If – on the other hand – you appreciate an accurate picture and want to watch a movie the way the director intended it to be watched, then the Philips 42PFL7662D is not for you. In my opinion, this TV is a product that has been hastily slapped together as an afterthought by Philips to jump on the 1080p bandwagon, with poor connectivity and picture quality given its price. P.S. Back to the Philips 42PF9831D story. We later reviewed the Sony KDL40W2000 and Panasonic TH42PX70 (successor to PX600) on which we achieved D65 greyscale with no colour decoding error fairly easily. Post-calibration, their picture quality simply blew the 42PF9831D away (in the eyes of two D65 zealots of course). :pirate: CJ :pirate:



Wot a load of nonsense!

At the end of the day this is a cracking Telly at a great price!

Since when did Hotukdeals become a review forum?

FFNYL

Wot a load of nonsense! At the end of the day this is a cracking Telly at … Wot a load of nonsense! At the end of the day this is a cracking Telly at a great price!Since when did Hotukdeals become a review forum?



FFNYL

Forget this machine, my parents have one & it is next to useless.Pay a … Forget this machine, my parents have one & it is next to useless.Pay a little extra & get one with a faster speed & that takes Whole fruits (Apples. Tomatoes, Pears etc.)We have an Anthony Warrel Thompson Pro Juicer which was £69 from Argos but it out-performs all the others on the market.



looks like a while ago :whistling:

LOL. Pwned.

Banned

FFNYL

Since when did Hotukdeals become a review forum?


What a very very stupid thing to say! :whistling::whistling::giggle:

Yes Indeed! Reviews can be a big help and often be the deciding factor to part with our money or not!

Reviews are always welcome on HUKD though admittedly they come via a link!

cutthroat_jake

Decent price, but not the best telly for the money.The 42" inch version … Decent price, but not the best telly for the money.The 42" inch version of this set reviewed by ]HDTVtest.co.uk.... To me, Philips is a company that has mastered the art of producing flat panels that dazzle in showrooms. When Colin and I started this website back in February 2007, the very first HDTV we went out and buy was the Philips 42PF9831D, because we were so impressed by its picture performance which outshone a Sony W2000 and a Panasonic PX600 flanking it in the Trafford Centre John Lewis AV room. However, once we brought it back to our test environment, we discovered to our dismay that achieving D65 with the 42PF9831D was more difficult than Pete Doherty quitting drugs. It's a similar story with the 42PFL7662D – Philips appeared to have hardcoded some gamma manipulation and colour decoder deviation designed to make the panel stand out from rival televisions in showrooms... at the expense of colour and greyscale accuracy. My point is this: some people like this sort of picture, and I can understand why. It's sharp. It's bright. It's vivid. Ultimately you should buy what your eyes prefer, and if cool colour temp floats your boat, the Philips 42PFL7662D deserves some consideration. Having said this, it lacks most of the illustrious technologies that define Philips as a respected flat screen TV manufacturer, so it may be worthwhile waiting for better models arriving later this year that will incorporate Ambilight, Perfect Pixel HD, HD Natural Motion or 100Hz Clear LCD. If – on the other hand – you appreciate an accurate picture and want to watch a movie the way the director intended it to be watched, then the Philips 42PFL7662D is not for you. In my opinion, this TV is a product that has been hastily slapped together as an afterthought by Philips to jump on the 1080p bandwagon, with poor connectivity and picture quality given its price. P.S. Back to the Philips 42PF9831D story. We later reviewed the Sony KDL40W2000 and Panasonic TH42PX70 (successor to PX600) on which we achieved D65 greyscale with no colour decoding error fairly easily. Post-calibration, their picture quality simply blew the 42PF9831D away (in the eyes of two D65 zealots of course). :pirate: CJ :pirate:




Mate the post was for a Philips 32" PFL7562 but you've posted a review for a 42" PFL7662D. The 7562 is far superior to the 7662 as it is equipped with Pixel Plus 2 HD, this is a review for the 7562, incidentally this set has gone up by £200 in the past fortnight, I purchased from Amazon @£459, today on Amazon it's £648.


While Philips has proven highly capable at the top end of the LCD TV market, its record at the budget end is rather mixed. So we set about testing the £700 32PFL7562D with more than a little trepidation in our hearts.

Things start passably well, though, with the set's design. Sure, it doesn't boast Philips' nice and soothing Ambilight technology, but its glossy black chassis is well built enough to look stylish atop its swivelling stand.

Connectivity is mostly outstanding for the price too. Twin HDMIs lead the way, ably supported on HD watch by a set of component video inputs. Also catching our eye, though, is a side-mounted USB port, capable of playing JPEG, MP3, MP3 Pro, LPCM, MPEG1 and MPEG2 file formats directly into the TV from USB storage devices.

Missing in action
AdvertisementThe only connection disappointment is the lack of a dedicated D-Sub PC port, meaning you'll have to either use one of the HDMIs or the component video input and attendant H/V sync jacks.

Impressively, a search for features quickly uncovers Philips' talented Pixel Plus 2 HD image processing, designed to boost colour uniformity, edges and especially fine detail.

Also on the strikingly long features menu are Digital Natural Motion processing for smoother presentation of movement; standard and MPEG noise reduction routines; Active Control, which continually adjusts various picture elements in response to what it believes the incoming image needs; and a colour enhancer.

Most importantly, the 32PFL7562D's pictures really are very good for £700. Black levels in particular are excellent. During our viewing of King Kong on HD DVD, as huge centipedes crawl over Ann when she hides in a hollow log, the darkness actually seems nearly black, without strikingly little of LCD's customary 'greying over'.

The picture is immensely detailed too, and the sharpness is delivered without serious attendant grain or dot crawl (this is one of the biggest advances of Pixel Plus 2 HD over earlier incarnations).
Colours are bright and generally natural, meanwhile, with only the slight tendency of reds to become orange giving any cause for concern, and edges look smooth and crisp without being overstressed (another advantage of Pixel Plus 2 HD).

Smear campaign
Given the £700 price tag, there are inevitably going to be weaknesses. Motion can look a touch smeary, especially during standard definition viewing; the Digital Natural Motion effect is weird if the feature is set any higher than its 'minimum' setting; skin tones occasionally look slightly 'waxy'; and to keep video noise to a minimum, you may have to tweak the contrast down.

But really these are bearable issues for such an affordable 32in LCD TV. Philips has at last managed to deliver a cut-price TV good enough to give similarly affordable stars a run for their money.

What Home Cinema

Amazon out of stock, now at £648.20 (from Popcorn, 3rd party seller)

Will amazon be getting more stock on this?
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text