Powerfix Torque Wrench Set £15.99. At Lidl
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Powerfix Torque Wrench Set £15.99. At Lidl

£15.99LIDL Deals
18
LocalFound 4th Oct 2015
This actually came available last Thursday (1st October) but just seen it in the latest store mag so stock may be limited by now. In the box,apart from the wrench,it has a 1/2 " extension and 3 sockets which are 17,19 and 21mm. Torque range is (Nm): 28-210. Anyone get one of these? Are they any good? Was thinking of getting one myself to add to my man toy collection!
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good price, i mean using it to tighten the wheel nuts
good price, will loom for one locally.

anyone know of a cheap torque wrench which will cover the lower ranges?
They are awful, they aren't calibrated correctly in the first instance. The quality of manufacturing is questionable as the sockets in the one one I had didn't fit correctly.

All I can say is if you want cheap then get it but it's not worth the money.

Oh and you won't be able to range that high - when using a torque wrench regardless you should buy one that is mid range of what you require. You should never max out the wrench, and don't forget when you put it away you need to unwind it.

yellowplum

They are awful, they aren't calibrated correctly in the first instance. … They are awful, they aren't calibrated correctly in the first instance. The quality of manufacturing is questionable as the sockets in the one one I had didn't fit correctly. All I can say is if you want cheap then get it but it's not worth the money.Oh and you won't be able to range that high - when using a torque wrench regardless you should buy one that is mid range of what you require. You should never max out the wrench, and don't forget when you put it away you need to unwind it.


Ok mate,thanks for the info.
yellowplum

They are awful, they aren't calibrated correctly in the first instance. … They are awful, they aren't calibrated correctly in the first instance. The quality of manufacturing is questionable as the sockets in the one one I had didn't fit correctly. All I can say is if you want cheap then get it but it's not worth the money.Oh and you won't be able to range that high - when using a torque wrench regardless you should buy one that is mid range of what you require. You should never max out the wrench, and don't forget when you put it away you need to unwind it.



Basically cheap tat then. Thanks will avoid
jase99

Basically cheap tat then. Thanks will avoid



Yes in a nutshell - depends how often you will use the item. I have winter tyres on another set of rims and service the car myself, so I get a little bit of use out of mine. I didn't go for the most expensive one but not the cheapest either - http://www.amazon.de/dp/B002O7H4XS/?tag=curiua0f-21

You can see a demo on the small one here (the large one works in the same way) youtube.com/wat…1zQ
Oh one other thing that people always do wrong with torque wrenches - especially the idiots in places like Kwik Fit - you only ever use it to click once - as can be seen the in the video above not repeatedly to torque and click.
jase99

Basically cheap tat then. Thanks will avoid


Goodness me jase have they got you mending the trolleys at Morrison's now?
yellowplum

Oh one other thing that people always do wrong with torque wrenches - … Oh one other thing that people always do wrong with torque wrenches - especially the idiots in places like Kwik Fit - you only ever use it to click once - as can be seen the in the video above not repeatedly to torque and click.


Also, once you have used it , turn it back down.
Never leave it with a torque setting on it
shakennstirred

[Also, once you have used it , turn it back down.Never leave it with a … [Also, once you have used it , turn it back down.Never leave it with a torque setting on it




And also never back it out beyond the minimum. Honestly I'm amazed anyone can keep these things calibrated with how easily they're broken/made inaccurate.

As for this one specifically, I'd head to Amazon and buy the Silverline for £17 instead - in fact I did, since I only use it occasionally, working on bicycles. It's well reviewed by hundreds of people, including the kind soul who took the time to test the calibration. In reality I'd be surprised if this isn't the same thing, rebranded for Lidl.
Edited by: "gbmcginty" 6th Oct 2015
I bought it - is really heavy / solid. I needed the extender to reach the spare wheel nut.

It has locking / ratchet mechanism for continuous turn without lifting. Haven't tried the adjustment bit the end, but should work.

I would have thought it is good tool for long term home use.
Apologies to all. Link to the original item has been changed to a basic Lidl home page, i guess due to it being on last weeks offers.
I got the Halfords one it comes with a calibration certificate.
I have one of these and it's excellent. I work in a Mechanical Test laboratory equipped with calibrated torque testers. I've had mine two years and checked it when I first got it and then again recently for a torque critical job (Cylinder head bolts into aluminium block) and both results were within 1Nm of nominal.

Lidl tools are typically higher quality than other budget brands as the majority are TUV approved which works to tighter tolerances than the more common CE approval.
compadre

Goodness me jase have they got you mending the trolleys at Morrison's now?


He'll be busy soon picking up all the discarded Match and More cards from the car park after they gave up trying to price match Aldi and Lidl.
matty_doh

I have one of these and it's excellent. I work in a Mechanical Test … I have one of these and it's excellent. I work in a Mechanical Test laboratory equipped with calibrated torque testers. I've had mine two years and checked it when I first got it and then again recently for a torque critical job (Cylinder head bolts into aluminium block) and both results were within 1Nm of nominal. Lidl tools are typically higher quality than other budget brands as the majority are TUV approved which works to tighter tolerances than the more common CE approval.


Do you really work for a lab? you probably need to read up on certification process. CE is just a self declaration that a product conforms to the relevant legislation within the EU, it does not mean the product is certified to meet any standard. Don't fool the general public into thinking CE mark = European Standard. TUV, ISO and BS these are the marks people should look out for.
hardbast

Do you really work for a lab? you probably need to read up on … Do you really work for a lab? you probably need to read up on certification process. CE is just a self declaration that a product conforms to the relevant legislation within the EU, it does not mean the product is certified to meet any standard. Don't fool the general public into thinking CE mark = European Standard. TUV, ISO and BS these are the marks people should look out for.



Hello there Captain Passive Aggressive,

At what point exactly did I say CE was a European standard? I said that Lidl tools are TUV approved which has stricter controls than CE which is entirely true and something you appear to agree with.

If a manufacturer agrees that the product they are manufacturing complies with CE requirements and is willing to take responsibility for that product they can apply the CE mark. It is also mandatory for certain products.

TUV testing is done independently and has much stricter controls over when the mark can be applied and poor quality tools will not meet the requirements and therefore will not be permitted to display the TUV mark.

But yes, I do work in a lab – admittedly not one that works with approvals, I’m a materials engineer for an aerospace firm.

Edited by: "matty_doh" 7th Oct 2015
matty_doh

Hello there Captain Passive Aggressive,At what point exactly did I say CE … Hello there Captain Passive Aggressive,At what point exactly did I say CE was a European standard? I said that Lidl tools are TUV approved which has stricter controls than CE which is entirely true and something you appear to agree with. If a manufacturer agrees that the product they are manufacturing complies with CE requirements and is willing to take responsibility for that product they can apply the CE mark. It is also mandatory for certain products, including measuring instruments. TUV testing is done independently and has much stricter controls over when the mark can be applied and poor quality tools will not meet the requirements and therefore will not be permitted to display the TUV mark. But yes, I do work in a lab – admittedly not one that works with approvals, I’m a materials engineer for an aerospace firm.


So you agree that the CE mark is applied by the manufactures themselves on self governance and not that the CE mark requires approval, which is what you said in your first comment: 'tighter tolerances than the more common CE approval' correct? CE marks virtually has no relevance with manufacturing tolerances, it's main purpose is to serve as some sort of assurance that the products meet the minimum safety standards so that people won't get poisoned, electrocuted or blew themselves up. My concern is that a lot of people outside engineering think that the CE mark stands for some sort of quality approval, well it isn't! It's as good as RoHS. Also certification like TUV cost money from around 10k for simple devices to hundreds of thousands. The cost of putting on the CE marking? Absolutely zero! I thought lab technicians/engineers are very well versed in testing standards, I'm not specialised in this area and often need to call them up to make sense of codes like ISO 527-5, ISO 1268-1 etc.
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