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QNAP TS-453A-4G 4 Bay NAS Enclosure with 4GB RAM £334.99 Amazon
QNAP TS-453A-4G 4 Bay NAS Enclosure with 4GB RAM £334.99 Amazon

QNAP TS-453A-4G 4 Bay NAS Enclosure with 4GB RAM £334.99 Amazon

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Lowest price ever, been keeping my eye on this for a while. would go perfect with those dirt cheap WD refurb hard-drives the other day...

Enjoy!

23 Comments

Been waiting for the 2 bay to be reduced for a while now, looks a nice bit of kit.

Bendown

Been waiting for the 2 bay to be reduced for a while now, looks a nice … Been waiting for the 2 bay to be reduced for a while now, looks a nice bit of kit.



​Same here, 2 bay hasn't dropped though, was hoping it would last night when the 4 bay showed up on Prime Deals

It seems a bit pricey to me for a nas box with no drives in it unless it's for a small business, and/or transfer speed is important to you.

The micro server argument is a good one here at around 100 quid and for that difference if you don't know how I would learn!

iand123

It seems a bit pricey to me for a nas box with no drives in it unless … It seems a bit pricey to me for a nas box with no drives in it unless it's for a small business, and/or transfer speed is important to you.



It's actually a really good price for a 4 bay NAS with this much power behind it. It gets heat from me as it's cheap for what it is, however that said:

I bought one of these a couple of months ago and returned it after a week. The interface is nice (Demo here if you like) but it's very broken in places, some things simply don't work for no apparent reason. With some Googling you'll find a workaround, which is often something completely unintuitive - for example, my Docker containers couldn't get any network connectivity and one of the suggested fixes was to install the OpenVPN server package! Failing that, the answer is nearly always to SSH in and run some arbitrary command.

If you're really comfortable with bash this probably won't be a problem for you, but as others have said - you may as well go for a Microserver then. I specifically bought this to replace my Microserver as as much as I love it, it was getting a bit too fiddly to maintain. I wanted something that "Just works"" with little faffing and the qnap was pure faffage.

One of the things I liked about the QNAP was its ability to run things like XBMC, with a HDMI out to a TV so you can use it as a full HTPC as well. Great idea, but it was a bit slow and the interface for launching the various "apps" was clunky at best. In the end, a raspberry-pi still works 10x better.

I ended up getting a synology, which are about £100-150 more but was worth every penny as it all does "just work". As stated, I'm still giving this deal heat because as far as I see, it's still a deal for this particular product but YMMV.

Kushan

[quote=iand123]I specifically bought this to replace my Microserver as as … [quote=iand123]I specifically bought this to replace my Microserver as as much as I love it, it was getting a bit too fiddly to maintain. I wanted something that "Just works"" with little faffing and the qnap was pure faffage.



I got the TS-453 pro (same spec as above) to replace my HP Microserver for the same reason, I can't fault it. I use it to store HD movies and music to stream to Sonos and various Kodi boxes, My HP struggled to cope at times but the QNAP does everything with ease.

I have this NAS I bought 2 x 4Gb Ram and upgraded the RAM to 8GB, it does everything I have tried.
Network speed is important I had 4 x HD camera's recording 24/7, I tried to stream movies and had buffering issues, changing my router for a more modern unit solved this. It is a huge improvement from Dlink 323 & 320 units I had before.
I have to admit to being over 50 and ssh is easier for me than using any apple device.

309 was the cheapest

daver77

I got the TS-453 pro (same spec as above) to replace my HP Microserver … I got the TS-453 pro (same spec as above) to replace my HP Microserver for the same reason, I can't fault it. I use it to store HD movies and music to stream to Sonos and various Kodi boxes, My HP struggled to cope at times but the QNAP does everything with ease.



Strange, my HP Microserver didn't really struggle with multiple HD streams (2), at least going direct to Kodi, not transcoding which probably would have stuffed it.

I should clarify that most of the issues I had with the QNAP was with the docker containers, so if you're not using them then you might be fine and dandy. Each to their own.

Do these have hardware or any sort of encryption?

Good price for an all in one solution like this.

However if you don't mind a DIY solution using something like openmediavault or freenas, you could have a similar setup for ~£165. You can also add a OS SSD drive for ~£30, although there are only 4 SATAs on that board, so would need a LP PCIe SATA adapter for ~£15).

Edited by: "sam0" 15th Aug 2016

Kushan

Strange, my HP Microserver didn't really struggle with multiple HD … Strange, my HP Microserver didn't really struggle with multiple HD streams (2), at least going direct to Kodi, not transcoding which probably would have stuffed it.I should clarify that most of the issues I had with the QNAP was with the docker containers, so if you're not using them then you might be fine and dandy. Each to their own.




why would you need docker stations? what do these enable to do? sorry new to nas drives etc

wakkaday

why would you need docker stations? what do these enable to do? sorry new … why would you need docker stations? what do these enable to do? sorry new to nas drives etc



So these NAS units tend to have like a package system for software you can install on it - things like Plex or MySQL or whatever. That's pretty cool and one of the nice things about them, but sometimes the software you want isn't available as a package for your NAS and you're pretty much out of luck. QNAP packages won't work on Synology systems and vice versa.

Docker works a bit like this, but is agnostic, so you can spin up the same docker "container" on any system that supports docker. It's not quite as simple as this, but that's the idea. Docker containers are great, they're lightweight and a good way to run software that can't conflict with other software. If you had a bare metal machine and started installing all your stuff on it, eventually you'll hit some kind of conflict, something will rely on Python 2.6.2 and something will require python 2.6.1 and the two can't exist side by side. In a container, they get their own instances of those dependencies so they don't spill all over each other, a bit like a VM but without the overhead of running an entire Operating system.

ah ok thanks

Although this is reeling more into a discussion, for me this offered the power to transcode on the fly for media streaming, which is all I plan to use it for (Plex), Microserver is overkill, more faff for basic NAS and uses more power (kWh).
But yes, each to their own.
(unless someone recommends a better option!)

I ordered 2 bay version of this from bt for £250 just thinking is 4 bay better . On prime day this was 309

Had an email about this offer from CamelCamel this morning, but couldn't place an order until I got home from work. Order now placed. Just want some nice cheap WD Red hard drives to go inside it. Missed the Western Digital My Book Duo 16TB with 2 x 8TB Reds inside, as again I was in work when the deal got posted. Hopefully, it will come back in stock soon.
Edited by: "bearcat" 15th Aug 2016

Kushan

So these NAS units tend to have like a package system for software you … So these NAS units tend to have like a package system for software you can install on it - things like Plex or MySQL or whatever. That's pretty cool and one of the nice things about them, but sometimes the software you want isn't available as a package for your NAS and you're pretty much out of luck. QNAP packages won't work on Synology systems and vice versa.Docker works a bit like this, but is agnostic, so you can spin up the same docker "container" on any system that supports docker. It's not quite as simple as this, but that's the idea. Docker containers are great, they're lightweight and a good way to run software that can't conflict with other software. If you had a bare metal machine and started installing all your stuff on it, eventually you'll hit some kind of conflict, something will rely on Python 2.6.2 and something will require python 2.6.1 and the two can't exist side by side. In a container, they get their own instances of those dependencies so they don't spill all over each other, a bit like a VM but without the overhead of running an entire Operating system.


I personally do not see the point in tinkering too much with a nas, the fact is it is a storage device that does a job, with little interference from the end user. If I wanted to start messing about with all the above I would get a computer rather than a nas. I have owned a qnap now for a few years and it does the job it should do.

Bendown

I personally do not see the point in tinkering too much with a nas, the … I personally do not see the point in tinkering too much with a nas, the fact is it is a storage device that does a job, with little interference from the end user. If I wanted to start messing about with all the above I would get a computer rather than a nas. I have owned a qnap now for a few years and it does the job it should do.



You have a much smaller use case than many people in this thread. The stuff we run on the NAS does far more than just store data, it helps make that data easily available in multiple places to range of devices. Plex is a great example of this, you're right - you want your NAS to store data, but what if you're on a train and want to watch a film you've legally ripped from a Blu-Ray? Your NAS sat at home just storing data doesn't help that, but your NAS running Plex means you can seamlessly stream it. Different use-cases for different folks.

Kushan

You have a much smaller use case than many people in this thread. The … You have a much smaller use case than many people in this thread. The stuff we run on the NAS does far more than just store data, it helps make that data easily available in multiple places to range of devices. Plex is a great example of this, you're right - you want your NAS to store data, but what if you're on a train and want to watch a film you've legally ripped from a Blu-Ray? Your NAS sat at home just storing data doesn't help that, but your NAS running Plex means you can seamlessly stream it. Different use-cases for different folks.


Fair comment

just purchased QNAP TS-453A-4G 4 Bay NAS Enclosure with 4GB RAM from amazon warehouse with their Current promo of 50 off 200. Total price £305 delivered. Now search for drive.
Amazon vouchers came with 15 percent discount (morrison deal) so guess effective price is around 250 to me.
Edited by: "sach1636" 19th Nov 2016
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