Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 16  - Free Download @ Archive.Org
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Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 16 - Free Download @ Archive.Org

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Found 10th Oct 2014
01 Rachmaninov_ Piano Concerto #2 In C Minor, Op. 18 - 1. Moderato 11:13

02 Rachmaninov_ Piano Concerto #2 In C Minor, Op. 18 - 2. Adagio Sostenuto 11:54

03 Rachmaninov_ Piano Concerto #2 In C Minor, Op. 18 - 3. Allegro Scherzando 11:43

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, is a concerto for piano and orchestra composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff between the autumn of 1900 and April 1901. The second and third movements were first performed with the composer as soloist on 2 December 1900. The complete work was premiered, again with the composer as soloist, on 9 November 1901, with his cousin Alexander Siloti conducting.

This piece is one of Rachmaninoff's most enduringly popular pieces,and established his fame as a concerto composer.

The work is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B♭ (I mov.) and A (II & III mov.), 2 bassoons, 4 horns in F, 2 trumpets in B♭, 3 trombones (2 tenor, 1 bass), tuba, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, solo piano, and strings. It is written in three-movement concerto form.

Moderato: C minor

The opening movement begins with a series of bell-like tollings on the piano that build tension, eventually climaxing in the introduction of the main theme. In this first section, the orchestra carries the Russian-character melody while the piano makes an accompaniment made of rapid oscillating arpeggios. After the statement of the long first theme, a quicker transition follows until the lyrical second theme, in E flat major, is presented.

The agitated and unstable development borrows motives from both themes changing keys very often and giving the melody to different instruments while a new musical idea is slowly formed. The music builds in a gradual climax as if the first bars were to be repeated, but in the recapitulation the theme is presented as unique to the first statement.

While the orchestra restates the first theme, the piano, that in the other occasion had an accompaniment role, now plays the march-like theme that had been halfly presented in the development, thus making a considerable readjustment in the exposition, as the main theme, played by the orchestra has become an accompaniment. This is followed by a piano solo, which leads into a descending chromatic passage and concluding with an eerie French horn solo. From here the last minutes of the movement are placid until drawn into the agitated coda, and the movement ends in C minor fortissimo

Adagio sostenuto – Più animato – Tempo I: C minor → E major

The second movement opens with a series of slow chords in the strings which modulate from the C minor of the previous movement to the E major of this movement. The piano enters, playing a simple arpeggiated figure. This opening piano figure was composed in 1891 as the opening of the Romance from Two Pieces For Six Hands. The main theme is initially introduced by the flute, before being developed by an extensive clarinet solo. The motif is passed between the piano and other soloists before the music accelerates to a short climax centred on the piano. The original theme is repeated, and the music appears to die away, finishing with just the soloist in E major.

Allegro scherzando: E major → C minor → C major

The last movement opens with a short orchestral introduction that modulates from E (the key of the previous movement) to C minor, before a piano solo leads to the statement of the agitated first theme. After the original fast tempo and musical drama ends, a lyrical theme is introduced by the oboe and violas. This second theme maintains the motif of the first movement's second theme. After a long period of development tension is built up considerably. Near the end, Rachmaninoff restates the second theme in loud, fortissimo orchestration. After this a fast, ecstatic and very triumphant coda draws the piece to a close, ending in C major.

Sviatoslav Richter, piano; Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra, Conducted by Stanislaw Wislocki.

5 Comments

Cheers Boz!
His piano concertos are completely bonkers! If you've ever seen the sheet music, it's mad.
Which reminds me, the brilliant film 'Shine' is on BBC2 tonight, if anyone has never seen it - I can highly recommend it.

Original Poster

lljwagg

Cheers Boz! His piano concertos are completely bonkers! If you've ever … Cheers Boz! His piano concertos are completely bonkers! If you've ever seen the sheet music, it's mad.Which reminds me, the brilliant film 'Shine' is on BBC2 tonight, if anyone has never seen it - I can highly recommend it.



I'll Give It A Brief Encounter
Edited by: "Boz" 11th Oct 2014

thank you as always Boz

Original Poster

mort1pratchett23

thank you as always Boz



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