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Rare(ish) Radiohead CDs £3.97/£4.47 delivered @ Tesco Ent (Com Lag: 2+2=5 / Airbag/How Am I Driving? / My Iron Lung / I Might Be Wrong - Live)
Rare(ish) Radiohead CDs £3.97/£4.47 delivered @ Tesco Ent (Com Lag: 2+2=5  / Airbag/How Am I Driving?  / My Iron Lung / I Might Be Wrong - Live)

Rare(ish) Radiohead CDs £3.97/£4.47 delivered @ Tesco Ent (Com Lag: 2+2=5 / Airbag/How Am I Driving? / My Iron Lung / I Might Be Wrong - Live)

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Whilst browsing for Radiohead bargains I fell upon a few "lesser" known offereings from them were cheap at Tesco Entertainment: -

Com Lag: 2+2=5 (£4.47)
Rather than follow the predictable path of a hits collection to fulfil their Parlophone contract, Oxford's Radiohead instead release, Com Lag, a compilation of recent B-sides (plus an exclusive and explosive live take of "2+2=5") from the ground-breaking Hail to the Thief. The schizophrenic mix of clattering technology and traditional (yet inventive) guitar rock is all the more pervasive here than anywhere else in the band's catalogue, with wildly differing results. Although this is mostly desirable to completists and the curious, that isn't to say they're not good; even on a bad day, Radiohead manage to be far more interesting than their contemporaries--as the eerie bass and strings of "Paperbag Writer" or the acoustic "Gagging Order" prove.
1. 2 + 2 = 5 (Live At Earls Court)
2. Remyxomatosis (Cristian Vogel RMX)
3. I Will (Los Angeles Version)
4. Paperbag Writer
5. I Am A Wicked Child
6. I Am Citizen Insane
7. Skttrbrain (Four Tet Remix)
8. Gagging Order
9. Fog (Again) (Live)
10. Where Bluebirds Fly
11. 2 + 2 = 5 (Live At Belfort Festival)

7 Comments

Original Poster mod

Airbag/How Am I Driving? (£3.97)
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1998 saw Radiohead perform pop music's most difficult task--their album OK COMPUTER was a critical smash, a worldwide pop hit, and, most importantly, a revolutionary step forward from the edgy, perfectly crafted pop music of their already masterful early efforts. Reintroducing a sense of intellectual adventure into rock music, at times they hearkened back to Pink Floyd, from whose compositional experimentation and epic scale they obviously gleaned a lesson or two. OK COMPUTER's opening track, "Airbag", serves as a starting point for AIRBAG/HOW AM I DRIVING.
The self-proclaimed "mini-album"opens with the stormy "Airbag", whose furious drum loop andemotive vocal build slowly into a guitar-led orchestra, where swirling, ghostly melody lines float and dart, crashing dramatically into the song's recurring musical motif. "A Reminder" sets a gentle, ominous melody against a backdrop of cascading guitar stabs, while "Polyethylene" contrasts pared-down metrical shifts with raging passages full of arena rock swagger. The curious, rambling "Melatonin" features almost no vocals, and the closer "Palo Alto" is chaotic and moody, filled with dynamic hurtles and skittering melody lines.
1. Airbag
2. Pearly
3. Meeting In The Aisle
4. Reminder
5. Polythylene
6. Melatonin
7. Palo Alto

Original Poster mod

My Iron Lung (£4.47)
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When exactly Radiohead transformed themselves from an average alterna-rock band into an avant-garde juggernaut is difficult to pinpoint, but in terms of recording, they took the great leap forward somewhere around the time of their second album, The Bends. While their debut, Pablo Honey, had a few sharp hooks, there was nothing to predict the avalanche of ideas that made The Bends one of the important albums of the 1990s. This EP (which is actually longer than some bands' full albums) doesn't clarify things a bit. The acoustic version of "Creep" that ends My Iron Lung is a sensitive read, but it doesn't explain the structural leap of the title track, which sounds as if the band had relearned how to play their instruments. Most of the remaining tunes are short, quirky numbers that point up Thom Yorke's penchant for melancholy melodies. Those who treasure the art rock of OK Computer or Kid A may find these plaintive pleas for love and understanding almost too simple.
1. My Iron Lung
2. Trickster
3. Lewis (Mistreated)
4. Punchdrunk Lovesick Singalong
5. Permanent Daylight
6. Lozenge Of Love
7. You Never Wash Up After Yourself
8. Creep

Original Poster mod

I Might Be Wrong - Live Recordings (£4.47)
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Given that Radiohead are one of the most zealously bootlegged bands in the world--nearly every public utterance is out there somewhere--the emergence of I Might Be Wrong, the band's first ever official live album, would seem a tardy and superfluous gesture. Conversely, Radiohead have never gone out of their way to actively discourage the black market trading of their live wares. Which makes you wonder just what is the intention of this live album? Could it be for hardcore fans who wish to remain on the right side of the law? Or could it be symbolic; the drawing of a double-ledger line under the sporadically interesting but frustratingly contrary anti-guitar rock intransigence of the Kid A/Amnesiac era and the opening-up of whole new chapter? Or perhaps it's because they just wanted to put out a live album? We must wait and see. And so, in all probability, must they. Nevertheless, I Might Be Wrong--featuring eight songs culled from live shows in Berlin, Oslo, the Roman amphitheatre at Vaison le Romaine (how very Pink Floyd of them) and their triumphant homecoming gig at Oxford's South Park--is pretty much beyond reproach, even if the renditions here--"National Anthem" (Charlie Mingus inspired with a raspy Motorhead bass line) "I Might Be Wrong" (Led Zeppelin meets Blondie's "Rapture") deviate little from the script of the original studio versions. The notable exception is an enchanting recital of "Like Spinning Plates", wherein the backwards electronica of the Amnesiac original is superseded by a romantic, ornate piano accompaniment for a classic Radiohead moment. Long-term devotees will also notice the first ever appearance on record of "True Love Waits" (Yorke with solo acoustic guitar), a song which Radiohead have grappled with for years and which finally finds a handle--and a home--right here.
This release features live recordings of material from Radiohead's no.1 albums 'Kid A' and 'Amnesiac'. Half of the tracks included were recorded at their gig in Oxford's South Park, in July 2001. The remaining tracks are taken from European dates of the same tour.
1. The National Anthem
2. I Might Be Wrong
3. Morning Bell
4. Like Spinning Plates
5. Idioteque
6. Everthing In Its Right Place
7. Dollars And Cents
8. True Love Waits

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My Iron Lung (£4.47)When exactly Radiohead transformed themselves from an … My Iron Lung (£4.47)When exactly Radiohead transformed themselves from an average alterna-rock band into an avant-garde juggernaut is difficult to pinpoint, but in terms of recording, they took the great leap forward somewhere around the time of their second album, The Bends. While their debut, Pablo Honey, had a few sharp hooks, there was nothing to predict the avalanche of ideas that made The Bends one of the important albums of the 1990s. This EP (which is actually longer than some bands' full albums) doesn't clarify things a bit. The acoustic version of "Creep" that ends My Iron Lung is a sensitive read, but it doesn't explain the structural leap of the title track, which sounds as if the band had relearned how to play their instruments. Most of the remaining tunes are short, quirky numbers that point up Thom Yorke's penchant for melancholy melodies. Those who treasure the art rock of OK Computer or Kid A may find these plaintive pleas for love and understanding almost too simple. 1. My Iron Lung2. Trickster3. Lewis (Mistreated)4. Punchdrunk Lovesick Singalong5. Permanent Daylight6. Lozenge Of Love7. You Never Wash Up After Yourself8. Creep



This was originally released as 2 four track CD singles which comprised the first 7 tracks on here.
The additional track on this isn't very well thought through if you know what My Iron Lung is about:whistling:

All are cracking cd's. Voted HOT!

Cue the' radiohead are depressing, but i like that creep song' posts.

Radiohead are depressing, but I do like that creep song...

;-)

Great prices... the live one is particularly good and The Trickster on My Iron Lung is ace

"Which makes you wonder just what is the intention of this live album? Could it be for hardcore fans who wish to remain on the right side of the law? Or could it be symbolic; the drawing of a double-ledger line under the sporadically interesting but frustratingly contrary anti-guitar rock intransigence of the Kid A/Amnesiac era and the opening-up of whole new chapter?"

What a load of pretentious c*ck. Don't get me wrong I like radiohead but thats just waffle with big words in so it vaguely sounds like it means something and its clever. Its a live album they get released nothing more and there's nothing wrong with that. This is the kind of waffle thats produced when universities produce nothing but media studies students.
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