Redex Petrol System Cleaner 4pk £4.50 @ Wilko
285°Expired

Redex Petrol System Cleaner 4pk £4.50 @ Wilko

19
LocalFound 28th Aug 2017
Bought this instore the other day, so probably nationwide as well as online. Price down from £8.50, thought it was a great deal and good to use to make older petrol engines more efficient.

Available for diesel engines as well wilko.com/car…248
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90ml in a bottle, not 250ml.

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19 Comments
Out of stock online.
Edited by: "AndyAT142" 28th Aug 2017
Great price. Thanks for posting.
This has only 90ml in a bottle compared with 250ml sold at Tesco, so fake savings, as it cost £2 for 250ml time form time...

31824319-gSak6.jpg
Edited by: "Rimi" 28th Aug 2017
You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not needed in modern engines, it's pure placebo effect
Edited by: "money-talks" 28th Aug 2017
Rimi7 m ago

This has only 90ml in a bottle compared with 250ml sold at Tesco, so fake …This has only 90ml in a bottle compared with 250ml sold at Tesco, so fake savings, as it cost £2 for 250ml time form time...[Image]

Well spotted! I ordered 2 packs online assuming it was the larger bottles, will get a refund when I go and collect..
Does this work in a petrol civic? WHats the mix with the fuel so 90ml you can put the whole bottle in
money-talks34 m ago

You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not …You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not needed in modern engines, it's pure placebo effect


You may be right regarding modern fuel inected engines, but the poster did say it was aimed at older engines (I suppose in that window between about 1990 when injection became common and before the modern generation of motors).
Do they do the diesel one?
nejjy9 m ago

Do they do the diesel one?


It says so in the rubric, why not read it first?
money-talks2 h, 24 m ago

You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not …You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not needed in modern engines, it's pure placebo effect

snake oil
money-talks2 h, 51 m ago

You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not …You can make a 100% saving by not using this rubbish, it's simply not needed in modern engines, it's pure placebo effect


Not strictly true, It has been shown to actually help restore power, it can help clean the fuel line, injectors etc.

True fuel additives won't increase bhp but may help restore lost power.

Fuel from the pump contains similar additives already and using a quality fuel could decrease natural carbon build up that happens over time hence redex may have no effect and be a waste but there's no real harm of using it to help maintain and possibly restore a little power.

Doesn't matter old or new engine, Fuel additives might actually be more beneficial to newish engines, More so the diesel engines. For example there is more carbon build up on egr systems these days as most modern engines now have egr cooler systems that cool the exhaust gases making them more sticky and more likely to clog the egr/intake system and restrict airflow etc. Some fuel additives may help clean the intake system etc.. Reducing the carbon build up and restoring the airflow.

There are also dpf additives that claim to help clean the dpf which isn't strictly true, They just help the regeneration process by reducing the combustion temperature of the soot. A clogged dpf will probably remain clogged.

There are other processes that can clean the intake/dpf system but not fuel additives.

If you want to maintain power and keep your fuel/intake system clean then the best way is to use better quality fuel, Maintain service schedule, Change oil and oil filter more frequently especially if doing lots of stop/start. 7-8K is recommended even if using "Long life oil" or every year whichever comes first.
shauneco1 h, 4 m ago

Not strictly true, It has been shown to actually help restore power, it …Not strictly true, It has been shown to actually help restore power, it can help clean the fuel line, injectors etc.True fuel additives won't increase bhp but may help restore lost power.Fuel from the pump contains similar additives already and using a quality fuel could decrease natural carbon build up that happens over time hence redex may have no effect and be a waste but there's no real harm of using it to help maintain and possibly restore a little power. Doesn't matter old or new engine, Fuel additives might actually be more beneficial to newish engines, More so the diesel engines. For example there is more carbon build up on egr systems these days as most modern engines now have egr cooler systems that cool the exhaust gases making them more sticky and more likely to clog the egr/intake system and restrict airflow etc. Some fuel additives may help clean the intake system etc.. Reducing the carbon build up and restoring the airflow. There are also dpf additives that claim to help clean the dpf which isn't strictly true, They just help the regeneration process by reducing the combustion temperature of the soot. A clogged dpf will probably remain clogged. There are other processes that can clean the intake/dpf system but not fuel additives. If you want to maintain power and keep your fuel/intake system clean then the best way is to use better quality fuel, Maintain service schedule, Change oil and oil filter more frequently especially if doing lots of stop/start. 7-8K is recommended even if using "Long life oil" or every year whichever comes first.


Thank you for that very helpful response - I take it you are a professional in the motor industry and I appreciate your knowledge.

I was interested in your comments about DPF additives. I like diesel cars and have not had any DPF problems so far (I use my diesel car mostly for long journeys and maintain a petrol car for local trips) but I have noticed a number of different DPF additives on the shelves of the motor factor. My question is: are any of these any use in preventing DPF problems? If you had a moment to comment that would be good.

I think you are right about changing oil frequently being a good preventative, I do so in both my diesel car (Skoda) and petrol car (Porsche) regardless of the manufacturers' recommendations (20,000 miles for the Porsche).
Edited by: "othen" 28th Aug 2017
Original Poster
Rimi4 h, 10 m ago

so fake savings, as it cost £2 for 250ml time form time...



Perhaps you would like to share with us where you can get 250ml for £2?
its paraffin
cstar29 m ago

its paraffin


I think you are mistaken: this is a detergent.
othen5 h, 10 m ago

Thank you for that very helpful response - I take it you are a …Thank you for that very helpful response - I take it you are a professional in the motor industry and I appreciate your knowledge.I was interested in your comments about DPF additives. I like diesel cars and have not had any DPF problems so far (I use my diesel car mostly for long journeys and maintain a petrol car for local trips) but I have noticed a number of different DPF additives on the shelves of the motor factor. My question is: are any of these any use in preventing DPF problems? If you had a moment to comment that would be good.I think you are right about changing oil frequently being a good preventative, I do so in both my diesel car (Skoda) and petrol car (Porsche) regardless of the manufacturers' recommendations (20,000 miles for the Porsche).


I work on my own, friends + families cars, I've done lots of research over the years and have come across many problems like clogged injectors, egrs etc.. Egr problems used to probably be the number one engine faults, When they clog up then you'll most likely get running problems, may even cut out or not start etc.. Especially if the valves stuck open.

Now it's mainly dpf faults you get on diesels, Often the dpfs clog more frequently due to other problems like egrs clogging, faulty injectors etc.. or too much stop/start town driving etc. In fact stop/start driving is the biggest contribution to the faults because the way regeneration works.

If you understand how dpfs work then you'll understand why they clog in such away.

They basically collect carbon/soot most of the bad stuff basically reducing NOx levels etc. Typically whilst driving slowly and idling, Mostly town driving etc.. That happens to be when most of the carbon buildup happens too on other components.

The dpf needs regenerating frequently to burn off the collected bad stuff. There are passive regenerating systems and active regenerating systems.

When regenerating the dpf gets heated up typically to 400-500oc in a passive system or 500-800oc in an active system maybe even higher. That burns all the bad stuff, built up carbon etc.etc.. Most of that goes out the exhaust, however some of it is left behind in the form of ash. Eventually that ash will fill the dpf and that's basically the end of the dpfs life. There is no additive that will get rid of the ash.

The additives may help reduce the combustion temperature of the built up carbon so it burns off easier during the regeneration process so there could be a benefit to using it to help assist but it isn't a miracle cure.

Passive regenerating systems heat the dpf using the exhaust gases, using various different methods. It takes a while for the dpf to reach the correct temperatures to regenerate. The ecu decides when it's time to regenerate, Typically when you're doing a nice run on the motorway. It doesn't always let you know when it's regenerating and if you do lots of motorway driving you may never really suffer any dpf problems. Perhaps until it's done something like 150-200k miles which is an acceptable sort of mileage imo.

Active systems inject an additive into the dpf to help raise the temperature, Usually diesel but sometimes other additives. It helps the regeneration process but the problem is that some of the injected additive ends up back in your engine. It gets mixed in with your oil and dilutes it. Hence why you need low saps (Sulphated Ash, Phosphorous, Sulphur) oil. It can actually raise the oil level in your car and cause all sorts of problems, Hence changing your oil more frequently, Especially on an active system. Using the wrong oil can be catastrophic for your dpf too.

When having your car serviced, make sure they use the correct oil too, Lots of them will chuck any old oil in them :(. Hence one of the many reasons I service my own.

Active systems clog up less than passive systems providing the regeneration cycles complete.

I hate the fact that most cars don't tell you when they're regenerating, In my case it's usually at the end of my journey or when it's inconvenient but I always try to let the cycle complete. Disturbing the process especially on active systems can be bad, If you don't complete the cycle, That injected additive may not have burned off and will end up back in your engine, diluting the oil etc.. Your car may or may not regenerate again once it's reached the correct temperature and conditions.

If you disturb the process too many times the dpf light may illuminate or other light like flashing glow plug light on some. If that's the case then you should take the car onto a motorway or long stretch of road if you can. Then drive in a low gear to 3000-3500rpm, I usually find one or two junctions is fine.

To complicate things more, Lots of cars now have an adblue system, This doesn't really help the dpf in any way, It just further helps reduce NOx emissions, The adblue is injected into the dpf/catalyst etc... If you run out of adblue your car won't start, You'll get a warning long before the adblue runs out, It'll go into limp mode and refuse to start if you ignore it.

Hope that helps.
Edited by: ".MUFC." 28th Aug 2017
shauneco3 h, 0 m ago

I work on my own, friends + families cars, I've done lots of research over …I work on my own, friends + families cars, I've done lots of research over the years and have come across many problems like clogged injectors, egrs etc.. Egr problems used to probably be the number one engine faults, When they clog up then you'll most likely get running problems, may even cut out or not start etc.. Especially if the valves stuck open. Now it's mainly dpf faults you get on diesels, Often the dpfs clog more frequently due to other problems like egrs clogging, faulty injectors etc.. or too much stop/start town driving etc. In fact stop/start driving is the biggest contribution to the faults because the way regeneration works.If you understand how dpfs work then you'll understand why they clog in such away.They basically collect carbon/soot most of the bad stuff basically reducing NOx levels etc. Typically whilst driving slowly and idling, Mostly town driving etc.. That happens to be when most of the carbon buildup happens too on other components. The dpf needs regenerating frequently to burn off the collected bad stuff. There are passive regenerating systems and active regenerating systems.When regenerating the dpf gets heated up typically to 400-500oc in a passive system or 500-800oc in an active system maybe even higher. That burns all the bad stuff, built up carbon etc.etc.. Most of that goes out the exhaust, however some of it is left behind in the form of ash. Eventually that ash will fill the dpf and that's basically the end of the dpfs life. There is no additive that will get rid of the ash.The additives may help reduce the combustion temperature of the built up carbon so it burns off easier during the regeneration process so there could be a benefit to using it to help assist but it isn't a miracle cure.Passive regenerating systems heat the dpf using the exhaust gases, using various different methods. It takes a while for the dpf to reach the correct temperatures to regenerate. The ecu decides when it's time to regenerate, Typically when you're doing a nice run on the motorway. It doesn't always let you know when it's regenerating and if you do lots of motorway driving you may never really suffer any dpf problems. Perhaps until it's done something like 150-200k miles which is an acceptable sort of mileage imo.Active systems inject an additive into the dpf to help raise the temperature, Usually diesel but sometimes other additives. It helps the regeneration process but the problem is that some of the injected additive ends up back in your engine. It gets mixed in with your oil and dilutes it. Hence why you need low saps (Sulphated Ash, Phosphorous, Sulphur) oil. It can actually raise the oil level in your car and cause all sorts of problems, Hence changing your oil more frequently, Especially on an active system. Using the wrong oil can be catastrophic for your dpf too.When having your car serviced, make sure they use the correct oil too, Lots of them will chuck any old oil in them :(. Hence one of the many reasons I service my own.Active systems clog up less than passive systems providing the regeneration cycles complete.I hate the fact that most cars don't tell you when they're regenerating, In my case it's usually at the end of my journey or when it's inconvenient but I always try to let the cycle complete. Disturbing the process especially on active systems can be bad, If you don't complete the cycle, That injected additive may not have burned off and will end up back in your engine, diluting the oil etc.. Your car may or may not regenerate again once it's reached the correct temperature and conditions.If you disturb the process too many times the dpf light may illuminate or other light like flashing glow plug light on some. If that's the case then you should take the car onto a motorway or long stretch of road if you can. Then drive in a low gear to 3000-3500rpm, I usually fine one or two junctions is fine.To complicate things more, Lots of cars now have an adblue system, This doesn't really help the dpf in any way, It just further helps reduce NOx emissions, The adblue is injected into the dpf/catalyst etc... If you run out of adblue your car won't start, You'll get a warning long before the adblue runs out, It'll go into limp mode and refuse to start if you ignore it.Hope that helps.


Excellent explanation, thank you very much indeed.
Edited by: "othen" 28th Aug 2017
The Diesel is still in stock, heat from me!
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