Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Renault Zoe Elec Auto 52kWh Lease 245 miles range - £6,627.63 (Deposit - £1,771.23 + £330 fee + 23 months at £196.80, 8k M pa) @ Leasehub
398° Expired

Renault Zoe Elec Auto 52kWh Lease 245 miles range - £6,627.63 (Deposit - £1,771.23 + £330 fee + 23 months at £196.80, 8k M pa) @ Leasehub

£6,627.63
123
Posted 9th JanEdited by:"Met-Cast"

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Extremely good deal for a car that isn't even out yet (deliveries start in March, I believe). Includes battery so no battery lease required.

If you're looking for an electric car with the most range per £, this is probably the best one out there. I've test driven the previous model and was extremely impressed with the drive.

I'm currently paying roughly £20-30 per month in electricity (1,000 miles) and £0 in tax. Can probably get cheaper electricity rate from a cheaper supplier too. So you get to drive a ~£26k car for 2 years for £6k.

Even cheaper if you can do business hire.

For those unsure about EVs, you can take an EV suitability test here elmodrive.com/que…re/

WLTP Range: 245 miles combined up to 300 in the city.
0-60mph: 11.4 seconds
BHP: 107bhp
Motor output: 80kW
DC Charge rate: 50kW max (56 mins 10-80%) OPTIONAL - need to pay extra for this
AC Charge rate: 22kW max (3hrs)

More info on Renault's website
EV database

Fully Charged Show video review


Top spec Zoe from DSG in Morecambe for only £500 more initial rental and £5 more per month. Definitely worth giving them a call to see if you can get a quote.

Top-spec GT Line comes only with the R135 motor, but adds the 9.3in touchscreen infotainment screen with sat-nav. Other additions include synthetic leather and recycled cloth upholstery, a reversing camera plus blindspot warning and 16in diamond-cut alloy wheels.

DRIVER CONVENIENCE
10" TFT Drivers information display
Chameleon charger AC 2-22kW
Charging cable (Type 2)
Cruise control + speed limiter
Cruise control switches on steering wheel
Driving style indicator
Eco mode
Econometer
Electric power steering
Lane departure warning system (LDW)
Lane keeping assistant (LKA)
Range indicator
Range optimizer
Slow speed pedestrian warning
Smartphone integration compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
Traffic sign recognition (TSR)


ENTERTAINMENT
12V socket in lower dashboard
2 USB sockets in rear
6 speakers
Steering wheel mounted controls


EXTERIOR FEATURES
Automatic hazard lights activation under emergency braking
Automatic headlights + automatic windscreen wipers
Automatic high/low beam
Automatic rain sensing wipers
Body colour bumpers
Body colour door mirrors
Body colour front door handles
Driver one touch and passenger electric windows
Electric rear windows
Electrically operated heated and folding mirrors
Front fog lights
Full LED headlamps with C-shape daytime running lights
Heated rear windscreen


INTERIOR FEATURES
3 rear head restraints
Automatic air conditioning
Driver/passenger sunvisors and vanity mirrors
Drivers seat with longitudinal adjustment and recline
Fabric upholstery (recycled)
Front charging socket
Front door storage bins with bottle holder
Gear shift indicator
Glovebox
Height/reach adjust steering wheel
ISOFIX on front passenger and rear outer seats
PET soft touch steering wheel
Soft armrests in door panels
Split folding rear seats
Stowage pocket in front passenger seat back
Twin front cupholders


SAFETY
3 point rear seatbelts x3
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Automatic parking brake
Child locks on rear doors
Driver/Front Passenger airbags
ESP + ASR traction control + CSV understeer control
Front passenger airbag deactivation
Height adjustable front seatbelts
Hill start assist
Rear disc brakes
Seatbelt pretensioners with load limiters
Seatbelt warning
Tyre pressure monitor


SECURITY
Deadlocking system
Electronic engine immobiliser
Hands free Renault card
RAID (Renault Anti-Intruder Device)
Remote central locking


TECHNICAL
32 amp (7kW) single wall box
Battery charge indicator


WHEELS
16" alloy wheels with Michelin tyres
Tyre repair kit
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
Glad we’re starting to see more EV deals.
Regarding this car(not the deal), it’s disappointing that DC charging at 50kW is a paid extra.

Manufacturers are really holding things back by behaving like this.
In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):

52 kWh battery and 245 mile range means it should do 4.7 miles per kWh.

Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1250 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.

Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 2.8p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.
loofer09/01/2020 23:14

If there was a choice, I’d forgo 50miles of range for a more powerful m …If there was a choice, I’d forgo 50miles of range for a more powerful motor. Surprised given it’s a small car too.As for M3 competitors expect the Audi E-tron Coupe, Polestar 2 & mustang Mach E to be out this year.


Thanks. The Mustang Mach E is closest on pre-order price of £40,300.
I also am puzzled by Tesla - and now Mustang - to set an RRP of a few hundred pounds higher than £40,000.
This adds £1600 for the consumer under the Premium Car Tax from years 2 to 6 as the RRP is >£40,000. The cars will sell better at £39,999.

Sorry OP, I'll stop my rants there
Uns09/01/2020 23:03

In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around …In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):52 kWh battery and 245 mile range means it should do 4.7 miles per kWh.Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1250 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel. Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 2.8p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.


The real life mileage (WLTP figure) of the 22W and 40kWh Zoe are both at least 25% less than the quoted Renault range pre-sale. Figures as per the OP's Fully Charged Video (2:40 minutes).

It's fair to assume the 245 mile pre-sale range will be around the same mark off in real-life. That brings it down to 190-200 miles.

Or - viewed from a different angle - your savings of £1000 per 10,000 miles will - in real driving conditions - only be £750 per 10,000 miles.

P.S. I'm not bashing the deal at all, and I am genuinely interested in getting an EV from my current petrol. I just want the prices for a car similar to the Tesla 3 to come down a bit and wish somebody would get on and innovate
Edited by: "Firefly1" 9th Jan
123 Comments
39637275-WKKNz.jpg39637275-TNr9K.jpg
Glad we’re starting to see more EV deals.
Regarding this car(not the deal), it’s disappointing that DC charging at 50kW is a paid extra.

Manufacturers are really holding things back by behaving like this.
loofer09/01/2020 22:40

Glad we’re starting to see more EV deals.Regarding this car(not the deal), …Glad we’re starting to see more EV deals.Regarding this car(not the deal), it’s disappointing that DC charging at 50kW is a paid extra.Manufacturers are really holding things back by behaving like this.


Unless you are referring to AC home charging I don't understand what you are saying. With the exception of Tesla, it's not the car manufacturer who provides the DC rapid chargers or the energy that the chargers use so how can it be anything other than a paid extra?
Edited by: "Bouncypete" 9th Jan
Bouncypete09/01/2020 22:49

Unless you are referring to AC home charging I don't understand what you …Unless you are referring to AC home charging I don't understand what you are saying. With the exception of Tesla, it's not the car manufacturer who provides the DC rapid chargers or the energy that the chargers use so how can it be anything other than a paid extra?


I’m solely going off the comment in the OP
“DC Charge rate: 50kW max (56 mins 10-80%) OPTIONAL - need to pay extra for this“

By that, I understand the battery can directly accept a 50kW rated DC charge, only if you pay extra.

Nothing to with AC or DC chargepoint operators
Avatar
deleted2410437
Glad there are some deals coming through.
Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.
I am surprised and thought this would actually be difficult to achieve such a slow acceleration, for a car that can deploy all power immediately as opposed to an Internal Combustion engine

It's a good price and therefore hot deal but we need more companies to be genuine Tesla (Model 3) competitors in terms of acceleration and range to continue to drive prices down.
Edited by: "Firefly1" 9th Jan
loofer09/01/2020 22:52

I’m solely going off the comment in the OP“DC Charge rate: 50kW max (56 min …I’m solely going off the comment in the OP“DC Charge rate: 50kW max (56 mins 10-80%) OPTIONAL - need to pay extra for this“By that, I understand the battery can directly accept a 50kW rated DC charge, only if you pay extra.Nothing to with AC or DC chargepoint operators


It can accept in theory but the CCS connector and DC inverter is what you need to pay extra for. It is a bit weird.

Still great as a 2nd car but not ideal for long journeys to be honest but with 240 mile range you can still go pretty far and top up 100 miles in an hour. Meaning you could do Birmingham to Aberdeen with a single 1 hour long stop or multiple 15 minute ones. Or just pay for the DC charging option.
In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):

52 kWh battery and 245 mile range means it should do 4.7 miles per kWh.

Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1250 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.

Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 2.8p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.
Firefly109/01/2020 23:00

Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.I am surprised and …Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.I am surprised and thought this would actually be difficult to achieve such a slow acceleration, for a car that can deploy all power immediately as opposed to an Internal Combustion engine It's a good price and therefore hot deal but we need more companies to be genuine Tesla (Model 3) competitors in terms of acceleration and range to continue to drive prices down.


It's the 0-30 seconds time that's super quick on electric cars - the setting off. I've heard it's around 2 seconds for this car? And in my experience it was definitely noticeable

30-60mph is a bit slower unless you get a Leaf and of course Tesla is just crazy.
Uns09/01/2020 23:03

In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around …In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):52 kWh battery and 245 mile range means it should do 4.7 miles per kWh.Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1250 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel. Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 2.8p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.


The real life mileage (WLTP figure) of the 22W and 40kWh Zoe are both at least 25% less than the quoted Renault range pre-sale. Figures as per the OP's Fully Charged Video (2:40 minutes).

It's fair to assume the 245 mile pre-sale range will be around the same mark off in real-life. That brings it down to 190-200 miles.

Or - viewed from a different angle - your savings of £1000 per 10,000 miles will - in real driving conditions - only be £750 per 10,000 miles.

P.S. I'm not bashing the deal at all, and I am genuinely interested in getting an EV from my current petrol. I just want the prices for a car similar to the Tesla 3 to come down a bit and wish somebody would get on and innovate
Edited by: "Firefly1" 9th Jan
Uns09/01/2020 23:03

In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around …In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):52 kWh battery and 245 mile range means it should do 4.7 miles per kWh.Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1250 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel. Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 2.8p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.


Does that take into account time taken to keep recharging?
I know you have to stop for fuel but far quicker than recharging.
Also what happens if you are stuck in a traffic jam does it still keep using electric charge.
I do think it's a great idea but we are not there yet on the technology to make it work more efficiently.
Met-Cast09/01/2020 23:02

It can accept in theory but the CCS connector and DC inverter is what you …It can accept in theory but the CCS connector and DC inverter is what you need to pay extra for. It is a bit weird.Still great as a 2nd car but not ideal for long journeys to be honest but with 240 mile range you can still go pretty far and top up 100 miles in an hour. Meaning you could do Birmingham to Aberdeen with a single 1 hour long stop or multiple 15 minute ones. Or just pay for the DC charging option.


Still,an extra £750. Hardly reasonable considering the market still needs to be developed and the masses still need convincing.

I agree it’s decent range and that 50kW charge would only be required for extensively long journeys.
Most destination chargers are still 7kW though

The homologated range according to WLTP test cycle for Iconic R110 and Iconic R135 is 239 miles and for GT Line R135 is 238 miles. Renault estimates average real world driving figures for this vehicle as 233 miles in summer and 150 miles in winter, depending on the factors above.
chuf09/01/2020 23:09

Does that take into account time taken to keep recharging?I know you have …Does that take into account time taken to keep recharging?I know you have to stop for fuel but far quicker than recharging.Also what happens if you are stuck in a traffic jam does it still keep using electric charge.I do think it's a great idea but we are not there yet on the technology to make it work more efficiently.


My figures assume you're charging at home with a standard domestic supply. The time taken to recharge wouldn't impact the cost.

If you're using public chargers then, like petrol stations, they can charge what they want to. Many are free, many will be triple the cost of charging at home.
Firefly109/01/2020 23:00

Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.I am surprised and …Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.I am surprised and thought this would actually be difficult to achieve such a slow acceleration, for a car that can deploy all power immediately as opposed to an Internal Combustion engine It's a good price and therefore hot deal but we need more companies to be genuine Tesla (Model 3) competitors in terms of acceleration and range to continue to drive prices down.


If there was a choice, I’d forgo 50miles of range for a more powerful motor. Surprised given it’s a small car too.

As for M3 competitors expect the Audi E-tron Coupe, Polestar 2 & mustang Mach E to be out this year.
Avatar
deleted2410437
chuf09/01/2020 23:09

Does that take into account time taken to keep recharging?I know you have …Does that take into account time taken to keep recharging?I know you have to stop for fuel but far quicker than recharging.Also what happens if you are stuck in a traffic jam does it still keep using electric charge.I do think it's a great idea but we are not there yet on the technology to make it work more efficiently.


I just recharge overnight in the drive so always have a full range, the range is more than I ever do in a day.

Once you're used to it it's amazing, not ever going to filling stations or getting in a cold car it's so smooth and civilised.

As for in traffic the range goes up as apposed to down in an ICE car but it will still use electricity sitting stationary as the AC uses a small amount.
loofer09/01/2020 23:14

If there was a choice, I’d forgo 50miles of range for a more powerful m …If there was a choice, I’d forgo 50miles of range for a more powerful motor. Surprised given it’s a small car too.As for M3 competitors expect the Audi E-tron Coupe, Polestar 2 & mustang Mach E to be out this year.


Thanks. The Mustang Mach E is closest on pre-order price of £40,300.
I also am puzzled by Tesla - and now Mustang - to set an RRP of a few hundred pounds higher than £40,000.
This adds £1600 for the consumer under the Premium Car Tax from years 2 to 6 as the RRP is >£40,000. The cars will sell better at £39,999.

Sorry OP, I'll stop my rants there
Firefly109/01/2020 23:00

Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.I am surprised and …Also disappointing to see 11.4 seconds for 0-60 mph.I am surprised and thought this would actually be difficult to achieve such a slow acceleration, for a car that can deploy all power immediately as opposed to an Internal Combustion engine It's a good price and therefore hot deal but we need more companies to be genuine Tesla (Model 3) competitors in terms of acceleration and range to continue to drive prices down.


It is basically a milk float with the flat bed removed😁
Great to see knowledgeable people talking about stuff they know about and sharing the knowledge on here.

I still have concerns about EV e.g. the batteries need Cobalt and there's now huge pressure to dredge this off the seabed, on a huge scale, in the few places where it's found.

But going forward, the performance and supporting infrastructure does seem to be getting in place at least.
Firefly109/01/2020 23:08

The real life mileage (WLTP figure) of the 22W and 40kWh Zoe are both at …The real life mileage (WLTP figure) of the 22W and 40kWh Zoe are both at least 25% less than the quoted Renault range pre-sale. Figures as per the OP's Fully Charged Video (2:40 minutes).It's fair to assume the 245 mile pre-sale range will be around the same mark off in real-life. That brings it down to 190-200 miles.Or - viewed from a different angle - your savings of £1000 per 10,000 miles will - in real driving conditions - only be £750 per 10,000 miles.P.S. I'm not bashing the deal at all, and I am genuinely interested in getting an EV from my current petrol. I just want the prices for a car similar to the Tesla 3 to come down a bit and wish somebody would get on and innovate


As the electricity is so cheap compared to petrol/diesel the savings hardly change when changing the assumed range of the battery:

With a 245 mile range you save around £1074 per 10,000 miles.

With a 190 mile range you save around £994 per 10,000 miles.


Full calculations below in case you're interested:

190 miles means 3.65 miles per kWh (so a cost of 3.56p per mile with a standard 13p per kWh tariff). Compared with diesel/petrol at 13.5p per mile means a saving of £994 per 10,000 miles.

245 miles means 4.71 miles per kWh (so a cost of 2.76p per mile with a standard 13p per kWh tariff). Compared with diesel/petrol at 13.5p per mile means a saving of £1074 per 10,000 miles.
boostii09/01/2020 23:37

It is basically a milk float with the flat bed removed😁


My dad used to service Dairy Crest milk floats in the 90's, so I know where you're coming from. Under the flat bed was basically a huge bank of lead acid batteries.

But you're wrong. Just do a quick Google for stuff like this, or "Tesla drag race". If TLDR; they're already faster than internal combustion engined cars.

39637779-Huc94.jpg
It would be cheaper overall to lease a small petrol.

Like this for £3405 24 months plus approx £1600 for 16k Miles fuel. (expired deal but it’s an example). Also less faffing about, just fill her up every now and then..

39638123-kKh3M.jpg
Edited by: "Madchester" 10th Jan
Madchester10/01/2020 01:54

It would be cheaper overall to lease a small petrol.Like this for £3405 24 …It would be cheaper overall to lease a small petrol.Like this for £3405 24 months plus approx £1600 for 16k Miles fuel. (expired deal but it’s an example). Also less faffing about, just fill her up every now and then..[Image]


Is that an automatic though? It's not like for like is it? Cheapest automatic is probably a lot more.

Plus, driving an electric car is quite the experience it's not neccesarily about being the cheapest. I'd happily pay extra to do it.

I find taking a detour to a petrol station more faff vs just plugging in overnight and waking up with a full tank for longer journeys I charge while stopping for comfort break + food and the car is usually ready before I am.
Edited by: "Met-Cast" 10th Jan
Met-Cast09/01/2020 23:05

It's the 0-30 seconds time that's super quick on electric cars - the …It's the 0-30 seconds time that's super quick on electric cars - the setting off. I've heard it's around 2 seconds for this car? And in my experience it was definitely noticeable30-60mph is a bit slower unless you get a Leaf and of course Tesla is just crazy.



O-30/40mph from a standing start most Evs will beat most cars easily. Its fun seeing the faces of Boy Racers when they try to burn you up from the lights but its you that pulls away in front.
Roger_Irrelevant09/01/2020 23:39

Great to see knowledgeable people talking about stuff they know about and …Great to see knowledgeable people talking about stuff they know about and sharing the knowledge on here. I still have concerns about EV e.g. the batteries need Cobalt and there's now huge pressure to dredge this off the seabed, on a huge scale, in the few places where it's found.But going forward, the performance and supporting infrastructure does seem to be getting in place at least.


Are you aware that the biggest user of cobalt is the petrochemical industry. It is used as a catalyst to remove the sulphur from fuel.

Additionally, the battery chemistry of EV batteries differs from other 'similar' batteries that are used in mobile phones. EV batteries are being made with just a couple of % cobalt whereas mobile phone batteries can use something like 40% cobalt.
loofer09/01/2020 22:52

I’m solely going off the comment in the OP“DC Charge rate: 50kW max (56 min …I’m solely going off the comment in the OP“DC Charge rate: 50kW max (56 mins 10-80%) OPTIONAL - need to pay extra for this“By that, I understand the battery can directly accept a 50kW rated DC charge, only if you pay extra.Nothing to with AC or DC chargepoint operators


Ah, now I understand why you said that.

The reason why it's a paid extra is that Renault believe the vast majority of owners would be unlikely to rapid charge so they make the card available £750 cheaper if you want.

And they are probably right too.

DC rapid charging usually costs 35 pence per KW and companies like Shell cost even more.

Whereas AC home charging can cost from as little as 5 pence per KW therefore most users of EV city cars like the Zoe charge every day at home and never rapid change.
I am in the process of getting one of these for my wife and kept doubting myself that it was the current model as this deal is very good! The OP beat me to it when posting this.

For our needs the CCS port is not needed and the slower performance compared with the new 135 motor doesn't bother us either. Its the 0-30 performance in town which is primarily what is needed and this will be fine.

I have had doubts since the latest Leaf deal is slightly cheaper and the kit levels between both the Leaf Acenta and this iconic models are similar but the 40% extra range and the styling changes made on this new Zoe was the deciding factor. That said the boot is 100 litres smaller and the cabin is less roomy also on the Zoe, so if its space you need then maybe consider the Leaf.
Flyingzard10/01/2020 07:37

I am in the process of getting one of these for my wife and kept doubting …I am in the process of getting one of these for my wife and kept doubting myself that it was the current model as this deal is very good! The OP beat me to it when posting this.For our needs the CCS port is not needed and the slower performance compared with the new 135 motor doesn't bother us either. Its the 0-30 performance in town which is primarily what is needed and this will be fine.I have had doubts since the latest Leaf deal is slightly cheaper and the kit levels between both the Leaf Acenta and this iconic models are similar but the 40% extra range and the styling changes made on this new Zoe was the deciding factor. That said the boot is 100 litres smaller and the cabin is less roomy also on the Zoe, so if its space you need then maybe consider the Leaf.


Ah I was about to lease a Leaf for 2 years for £6k.
Can you advise if this would be better instead mate?
I'd say 90% of my driving is motorway. However I could change my commute to be 50%.

The range seems much better in this. But watching what car review. Renault said the range drops to 150 miles in the winter. That's 100 less than quoted! So in the Leaf. Will that only do 50 miles in the winter??

Not sure which one to get now. I selected the heat pack for the leaf which was heated seats and wheel. Not sure if that's available on this
formsm2000comp10/01/2020 08:13

Ah I was about to lease a Leaf for 2 years for £6k.Can you advise if this …Ah I was about to lease a Leaf for 2 years for £6k.Can you advise if this would be better instead mate?I'd say 90% of my driving is motorway. However I could change my commute to be 50%.The range seems much better in this. But watching what car review. Renault said the range drops to 150 miles in the winter. That's 100 less than quoted! So in the Leaf. Will that only do 50 miles in the winter?? Not sure which one to get now. I selected the heat pack for the leaf which was heated seats and wheel. Not sure if that's available on this


What speeds do you drive at as the leaf range takes a dramatic hit if driving over 55 miles per hour
djdope10/01/2020 08:35

What speeds do you drive at as the leaf range takes a dramatic hit if …What speeds do you drive at as the leaf range takes a dramatic hit if driving over 55 miles per hour


Be the speed limit on all roads. So 70 on the motorway mate. You would recommend the Zoe then? I'm trying to compare standard kit between the deals. But unable to configure a Zoe on Renault is making it difficult
I know 10k miles is a nice round figure to compare running costs, but given this lease is for 8000k miles it's not a very accurate one...!
The Leaf maybe a bit comfier on the motorway and the performance is better which should help.

Having said that our current EV is the last iteration of the MK1 Leaf and that is 110 BHP or thereabouts and it is fine on the motorway.

Both the Leaf and Zoe suffer with temperature extremes and the resultant range is affected. Our leaf "should" do 155 miles. In the winter we get barely over 100 miles. The new Leaf suffers with this as well. If you want a more consistent range then go for an ionic, the new e208, or the new corsa etc which all have proper temperature controlled batteries which means you get a far better range close to what is quoted no matter what the ambient temperature is.

That said the Zoe does have a cracking range tbf and this deal imho is very good.
SirSpanky10/01/2020 08:39

I know 10k miles is a nice round figure to compare running costs, but …I know 10k miles is a nice round figure to compare running costs, but given this lease is for 8000k miles it's not a very accurate one...!


In this case it's just pro-rata:

If save around £1074 per 10,000 miles, then you'd save around £859 per 8,000 miles.

(I've done a full breakdown of these figures above).
You still get 22kW AC charging (on a suitable point, like the ones at motorway services) if you don't have the optional CCS, so same as most of the previous gen Zoes (where 43kW AC was a £750 option). That's about 90-95 miles of range in an hour of charging. Yes, slower than many cars but there are plenty of folks managing long trips in older 40kwh R110 Zoes and this would have another 10kwh of capacity to start with.

For us though a 200+ mile range car like this would do almost all journeys we do without even needing to touch public charging.
formsm2000comp10/01/2020 08:13

Ah I was about to lease a Leaf for 2 years for £6k.Can you advise if this …Ah I was about to lease a Leaf for 2 years for £6k.Can you advise if this would be better instead mate?I'd say 90% of my driving is motorway. However I could change my commute to be 50%.The range seems much better in this. But watching what car review. Renault said the range drops to 150 miles in the winter. That's 100 less than quoted! So in the Leaf. Will that only do 50 miles in the winter?? Not sure which one to get now. I selected the heat pack for the leaf which was heated seats and wheel. Not sure if that's available on this


You can get the Winter pack in this for £500 which comes with heated seats and heated steering wheel. Pushes the monthly up by ~£15. It's listed under the options.

Generally, people like the Leaf for the tech inside and the spaciousness. However, I like the Zoe's styling and driving, personally. Do you have a chance to test drive both?

Personally, I'd go for more range if you don't need the space especially if motorway driving since the added size of the Leaf reduces aerodynamics. I have the Ioniq which is the most efficient car out there and I get about 170 miles in winter and that's with a 38kWh battery so I'd expect you to get more than 150 miles with a 52kWh battery in this Zoe. Plus with the Zoe's refresh you're getting a lot of newer tech like the infotainment cluster whereas the Leaf hasn't really been updated for 9 years.

One advantage over the Leaf is that the Zoe comes with active thermal management so the battery will be a better condition over it's lifetime, this is especially important if you rapid charge a lot. I'm not sure how important this is if you're only having the car for 2 years.

The Zoe doesn't have Adaptive Cruise Control whereas the Leaf does so that's worth a consideration if you're doing a lot of motorway driving.
Uns10/01/2020 09:25

In this case it's just pro-rata:If save around £1074 per 10,000 miles, …In this case it's just pro-rata:If save around £1074 per 10,000 miles, then you'd save around £859 per 8,000 miles.(I've done a full breakdown of these figures above).


I know it seems like I was being pedantic, but it read very much like 'this deal will save you £1000+ per year when that simply wasn't true based off the yearly milleage limit.
If you are within driving distance of Milton Keynes you should visit the EV Experience Centre. They have Leafs and Zoes to test drive.

Real world Leaf range at worst - 70 mph motorway driving in winter could be around 100 miles. At best 40-60 mph in summer nearer 160-180 miles.

The EV experience centre can even hire you a car for a few days to try out your commute (cost is less than £100).
LeafLily10/01/2020 10:06

If you are within driving distance of Milton Keynes you should visit the …If you are within driving distance of Milton Keynes you should visit the EV Experience Centre. They have Leafs and Zoes to test drive.Real world Leaf range at worst - 70 mph motorway driving in winter could be around 100 miles. At best 40-60 mph in summer nearer 160-180 miles.The EV experience centre can even hire you a car for a few days to try out your commute (cost is less than £100).



It's worth doing this. I got a Zoe for a few days for £50 which you might get back if you order. They don't have Leafs anymore but I'm sure any Nissan dealer will be able to give you one for a few hours.
i would love to get an ev but can’t get past the fear of getting to a place to charge it on a long journey and finding myself 4th in the queue, until charging is as quick and easy as putting petrol in then it is a no no for many people, especially when the cars themselves are so expensive that any potential savings on fuel costs are completely wiped out
Please clarify (1) do these come with home charging adaptor and 3 pin plug fly lead and if not how much. (2) does this have satnav that shows nearest charging points to help ease the range anxiety. Thanks
chublet10/01/2020 10:33

i would love to get an ev but can’t get past the fear of getting to a p …i would love to get an ev but can’t get past the fear of getting to a place to charge it on a long journey and finding myself 4th in the queue, until charging is as quick and easy as putting petrol in then it is a no no for many people, especially when the cars themselves are so expensive that any potential savings on fuel costs are completely wiped out


That's a fair point. It's worth asking yourself - How many long journeys do you do a year that are over 240 miles? What are the chances that someone else is on the same route and needing to charge at the same time in the same service station? There are also other chargers near motorways also.

I've been driving an EV for 6 weeks and done ~1100 miles and have never queued up to charge. The bigger issue is if a charger isn't working, usually there are multiple chargers/sockets in one place so that alleviates that risk. There are apps such as Zap-Map which can tell you if a charger is in use or not.
Edited by: "Met-Cast" 10th Jan
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text