Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Ring Full HD 1080p Video Doorbell 2 with Chime £109.98 @ Costco
1345° Expired

Ring Full HD 1080p Video Doorbell 2 with Chime £109.98 @ Costco

£109.98£112.993%Costco Deals
68
Posted 21st Nov 2019

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

As above available from 25th November...

BLACKFRIDAY10 will take a further £10 off..

See, hear and speak to anyone at your door from your smartphone, tablet or PC. Plug in the Ring Chime to any standard power outlet to receive Ring notifications via Wi-Fi anywhere in your home.
Get instant alerts when visitors press your doorbell or trigger the built-in motion sensors. Then use the Ring app to see, hear and speak to anyone at your door from your smartphone, tablet or PC. Disable the Ring Chime for times when you want peace and quiet.
Ring lets you customise your motion sensors, so you’ll always be the first to know when you have a visitor. With infrared night vision and a weather-resistant design, you can monitor your home around the clock – day or night, rain or shine.
Power your Video Doorbell with its built-in rechargeable battery, or connect it to your existing doorbell wiring for a non-stop charge.
With customisable face plates, the Ring Video Door Bell 2 has a finish to match your home and your style.
Features:
Full HD 1080p video with two-way talk and noise cancellation
Motion activated alerts for your customised motion zones
Infrared night vision
Dual power options - rechargeable battery or existing doorbell wiring
Set a custom volume in the Ring app for your Ring Chime
Includes 2 interchangeable faceplates - Satin White and Satin Black
One battery is included
Comes with 6 months free Ring Cloud subscription. Simply download the Ring app to register your RVD2 to receive this.


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Top comments
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:57

Given how clear the ICO are that recording anything outside your boundary …Given how clear the ICO are that recording anything outside your boundary means you are a Data Controller, have to have clear signage about it, have to respond to Subject Access Requests, have to have a privacy policy etc. I wouldn't take that risk:"What happens if I break the law?If you fail to comply with your obligations under the data protection laws, you may be subject to enforcement action by the ICO. This could include a fine. You may also be subject to legal action by affected individuals, who could pursue court claims for compensation.If you follow our guidance and take all reasonable steps to comply with your data protection obligations, the ICO is unlikely to regard you as a regulatory risk. So the ICO would be unlikely to think that taking enforcement action against you was a proportionate use of its resources."


Highly dramatic and highly unenforceable.
sadiegul201021/11/2019 22:46

It says code is invalid ?


Correct me if I'm wrong but it's not the 25th yet
Reiko922/11/2019 21:29

Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. …Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. I've found complaining to the ICO does get things actioned, even if it takes a few months.


Oh so your a whinger then - people just trying to protect what is rightfully there's and you go and snitch saying you are being watched etc privacy rights etc get a grip.

Loads of my neighbours know I have cctv and it actually makes them feel safer!! Explain that.
Edited by: "PennyTrader" 22nd Nov 2019
68 Comments
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£119 on the coupon
I think the £119.98 is a good deal! Does state online price varies so not convinced you will get it for 109.98 though.... voted hot anyway
wildswan21/11/2019 21:36

£119 on the coupon


BLACKFRIDAY10 will take £10 off according to the OP’s post.
Norman-B21/11/2019 21:49

BLACKFRIDAY10 will take £10 off according to the OP’s post.


BLACKFRIDAY10 only works online and the leaflet clearly states online prices varies from warehouse price so we will need to see what the online price is first before being able to confirm this deal
Is it so hard to read just the first line of these posts....
It says code is invalid ?
Are you able to use memory cards on these?
sadiegul201021/11/2019 22:46

It says code is invalid ?


Correct me if I'm wrong but it's not the 25th yet
I see amazon have reduced theirs to £119 but has no chime
£124.99 delivered now but from 25th code BLACKFRIDAY10 should bring it down to £112.49. The chime is the basic chime, no wifi extender (link here costco)
Edited by: "freccle" 22nd Nov 2019
If these record anything outside your property (e.g. people walking past), do you have to put a sign up telling them about their rights under GDPR to make a Subject Access Request to you and what your privacy policy is?
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:06

If these record anything outside your property (e.g. people walking past), …If these record anything outside your property (e.g. people walking past), do you have to put a sign up telling them about their rights under GDPR to make a Subject Access Request to you and what your privacy policy is?


not really, i have a camera which overlooks our road, there was an incident recently where the police were called at a house opposite and the police wanted to take a look at what the camera picked up.
They couldn't care less about the positioning of the camera so i wouldn't worry about people walking past - after all if they aren't doing anything wrong then nothing to worry about is there
PennyTrader22/11/2019 11:40

not really, i have a camera which overlooks our road, there was an …not really, i have a camera which overlooks our road, there was an incident recently where the police were called at a house opposite and the police wanted to take a look at what the camera picked up.They couldn't care less about the positioning of the camera so i wouldn't worry about people walking past - after all if they aren't doing anything wrong then nothing to worry about is there


The police deal with criminal matters, they don't deal with anyone breaching GDPR. That is the job of the ICO and the civil courts. I'll check what the ICO say...
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:45

The police deal with criminal matters, they don't deal with anyone …The police deal with criminal matters, they don't deal with anyone breaching GDPR. That is the job of the ICO and the civil courts. I'll check what the ICO say...


ok
PennyTrader22/11/2019 11:40

not really, i have a camera which overlooks our road, there was an …not really, i have a camera which overlooks our road, there was an incident recently where the police were called at a house opposite and the police wanted to take a look at what the camera picked up.They couldn't care less about the positioning of the camera so i wouldn't worry about people walking past - after all if they aren't doing anything wrong then nothing to worry about is there


Yeah it's bad news - recording anything outside your property makes you a Data Controller, which is a serious matter, and requires signage being put up and dealing with Subject Access Requests along with having some sort of privacy policy.

ico.org.uk/your-data-matters/domestic-cctv-systems-guidance-for-people-using-cctv/

"What is the law if my CCTV captures images of people outside my own home and garden?

If your CCTV captures images beyond your property boundary, such as your neighbours’ property or public streets and footpaths, then your use of the system is subject to the data protection laws.

This does not mean you are breaking the law. But it does mean that, as the CCTV user, you are a data controller. So you will need to comply with your legal obligations under the data protection laws.

You can still capture images, but you need to show you are doing it in ways that comply with the data protection laws and uphold the rights of the people whose images you are capturing.

What must I do if I capture images of people outside my own home and garden?

If you are capturing images beyond your property boundary, you should have a clear and justifiable reason for doing so. In particular, you will need to think why you need these images. If asked by an individual or the ICO, you will need to be able to explain your reasons, so you should write them down now. You should also write down why you think capturing the images is more important than invading the privacy of your neighbours and passers-by.

You will also need to:

Let people know you are using CCTV by putting up signs saying that recording is taking place, and why.

Ensure you don’t capture more footage than you need to achieve your purpose in using the system.

Ensure the security of the footage you capture – in other words, holding it securely and making sure nobody can watch it without good reason.

Only keep the footage for as long as you need it – delete it regularly, and when it is no longer needed.
Ensure the CCTV system is only operated in ways you intend and can’t be misused for other reasons.

Anyone you share your property with, such as family members who could use the equipment, needs to know the importance of not misusing it.

You also need to make sure you respect the data protection rights of the people whose images you capture. This includes the following things:

Responding to subject access requests (SARs), if you receive any. Individuals have a right to access the personal data you hold about them, including identifiable images. They can ask you verbally or in writing. You must respond within one month and give them a copy of the data.

Deleting footage of people if they ask you to do so. You should do this within one month. You can refuse to delete it if you specifically need to keep it for a genuine legal dispute – in which case you need to tell them this, and also tell them they can challenge this in court or complain to the ICO.

Consider any objection you get now from particular people about capturing their image in the future. Given the nature of CCTV systems, this may be very difficult to do. However, you should again think whether you need to record images beyond your property boundary – particularly if your system is capturing images from a neighbour’s home or garden."

I don't see how anyone can have a Ring system that only records video within their property boundary given they face out towards the road, but if you can then you are fine.
Edited by: "arCuThEDOWDr" 22nd Nov 2019
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:48

Yeah it's bad …Yeah it's bad news...https://ico.org.uk/your-data-matters/domestic-cctv-systems-guidance-for-people-using-cctv/"What is the law if my CCTV captures images of people outside my own home and garden?If your CCTV captures images beyond your property boundary, such as your neighbours’ property or public streets and footpaths, then your use of the system is subject to the data protection laws.This does not mean you are breaking the law. But it does mean that, as the CCTV user, you are a data controller. So you will need to comply with your legal obligations under the data protection laws.You can still capture images, but you need to show you are doing it in ways that comply with the data protection laws and uphold the rights of the people whose images you are capturing.What must I do if I capture images of people outside my own home and garden?If you are capturing images beyond your property boundary, you should have a clear and justifiable reason for doing so. In particular, you will need to think why you need these images. If asked by an individual or the ICO, you will need to be able to explain your reasons, so you should write them down now. You should also write down why you think capturing the images is more important than invading the privacy of your neighbours and passers-by.You will also need to:Let people know you are using CCTV by putting up signs saying that recording is taking place, and why.Ensure you don’t capture more footage than you need to achieve your purpose in using the system.Ensure the security of the footage you capture – in other words, holding it securely and making sure nobody can watch it without good reason.Only keep the footage for as long as you need it – delete it regularly, and when it is no longer needed.Ensure the CCTV system is only operated in ways you intend and can’t be misused for other reasons.Anyone you share your property with, such as family members who could use the equipment, needs to know the importance of not misusing it.You also need to make sure you respect the data protection rights of the people whose images you capture. This includes the following things:Responding to subject access requests (SARs), if you receive any. Individuals have a right to access the personal data you hold about them, including identifiable images. They can ask you verbally or in writing. You must respond within one month and give them a copy of the data.Deleting footage of people if they ask you to do so. You should do this within one month. You can refuse to delete it if you specifically need to keep it for a genuine legal dispute – in which case you need to tell them this, and also tell them they can challenge this in court or complain to the ICO.Consider any objection you get now from particular people about capturing their image in the future. Given the nature of CCTV systems, this may be very difficult to do. However, you should again think whether you need to record images beyond your property boundary – particularly if your system is capturing images from a neighbour’s home or garden."


all well and good that but i think you will find the vast majority of private CCTV systems pick up adjoining houses and public footpaths etc, so as i have already said i wouldn't worry about it in the slightest.
PennyTrader22/11/2019 11:54

all well and good that but i think you will find the vast majority of …all well and good that but i think you will find the vast majority of private CCTV systems pick up adjoining houses and public footpaths etc, so as i have already said i wouldn't worry about it in the slightest.


Given how clear the ICO are that recording anything outside your boundary means you are a Data Controller, have to have clear signage about it, have to respond to Subject Access Requests, have to have a privacy policy etc. I wouldn't take that risk:

"What happens if I break the law?

If you fail to comply with your obligations under the data protection laws, you may be subject to enforcement action by the ICO. This could include a fine. You may also be subject to legal action by affected individuals, who could pursue court claims for compensation.

If you follow our guidance and take all reasonable steps to comply with your data protection obligations, the ICO is unlikely to regard you as a regulatory risk. So the ICO would be unlikely to think that taking enforcement action against you was a proportionate use of its resources."
Edited by: "arCuThEDOWDr" 22nd Nov 2019
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:57

Given how clear the ICO are that recording anything outside your boundary …Given how clear the ICO are that recording anything outside your boundary means you are a Data Controller, have to have clear signage about it, have to respond to Subject Access Requests, have to have a privacy policy etc. I wouldn't take that risk:"What happens if I break the law?If you fail to comply with your obligations under the data protection laws, you may be subject to enforcement action by the ICO. This could include a fine. You may also be subject to legal action by affected individuals, who could pursue court claims for compensation.If you follow our guidance and take all reasonable steps to comply with your data protection obligations, the ICO is unlikely to regard you as a regulatory risk. So the ICO would be unlikely to think that taking enforcement action against you was a proportionate use of its resources."


Highly dramatic and highly unenforceable.
PennyTrader22/11/2019 12:20

Highly dramatic and highly unenforceable.


We'll agree to disagree
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:48

Yeah it's bad news - recording anything outside your property makes you a …Yeah it's bad news - recording anything outside your property makes you a Data Controller, which is a serious matter, and requires signage being put up and dealing with Subject Access Requests along with having some sort of privacy policy.ico.org.uk/your-data-matters/domestic-cctv-systems-guidance-for-people-using-cctv/"What is the law if my CCTV captures images of people outside my own home and garden?If your CCTV captures images beyond your property boundary, such as your neighbours’ property or public streets and footpaths, then your use of the system is subject to the data protection laws.This does not mean you are breaking the law. But it does mean that, as the CCTV user, you are a data controller. So you will need to comply with your legal obligations under the data protection laws.You can still capture images, but you need to show you are doing it in ways that comply with the data protection laws and uphold the rights of the people whose images you are capturing.What must I do if I capture images of people outside my own home and garden?If you are capturing images beyond your property boundary, you should have a clear and justifiable reason for doing so. In particular, you will need to think why you need these images. If asked by an individual or the ICO, you will need to be able to explain your reasons, so you should write them down now. You should also write down why you think capturing the images is more important than invading the privacy of your neighbours and passers-by.You will also need to:Let people know you are using CCTV by putting up signs saying that recording is taking place, and why.Ensure you don’t capture more footage than you need to achieve your purpose in using the system.Ensure the security of the footage you capture – in other words, holding it securely and making sure nobody can watch it without good reason.Only keep the footage for as long as you need it – delete it regularly, and when it is no longer needed.Ensure the CCTV system is only operated in ways you intend and can’t be misused for other reasons.Anyone you share your property with, such as family members who could use the equipment, needs to know the importance of not misusing it.You also need to make sure you respect the data protection rights of the people whose images you capture. This includes the following things:Responding to subject access requests (SARs), if you receive any. Individuals have a right to access the personal data you hold about them, including identifiable images. They can ask you verbally or in writing. You must respond within one month and give them a copy of the data.Deleting footage of people if they ask you to do so. You should do this within one month. You can refuse to delete it if you specifically need to keep it for a genuine legal dispute – in which case you need to tell them this, and also tell them they can challenge this in court or complain to the ICO.Consider any objection you get now from particular people about capturing their image in the future. Given the nature of CCTV systems, this may be very difficult to do. However, you should again think whether you need to record images beyond your property boundary – particularly if your system is capturing images from a neighbour’s home or garden."I don't see how anyone can have a Ring system that only records video within their property boundary given they face out towards the road, but if you can then you are fine.


Good luck to the ICO policing this.
mikkeey22/11/2019 17:29

Good luck to the ICO policing this.


I would worry more about someone / a neighbour you don't get along with getting lawyered-up and taking you to court.

I get this isn't welcome news for anyone with these devices, or other home security devices, that record outside the property boundary, but when I realised what GDPR says on this it has really put me off from getting a Ring doorbell and I thought it would be useful information for others.

Obviously everyone who is a Data Controller has their own responsibilities to follow the law, and can act on the info as they please knowing the risks.
Edited by: "arCuThEDOWDr" 22nd Nov 2019
I have this one and paid lots so this is a bargain! And if you have good WiFi then it’s a bonus I also pay £24 a year for recording in cloud
You are better off getting a traditional CCTV camera so that you can angle it downwards. Then you can see who is at the door and also avoid recording outside your property and being subject to GDPR and other legal hassles.

I know some of those cameras do have apps to let you view them but I don't know if any can be linked to a doorbell.

If my neighbour got one of these Ring devices I'd definitely be looking to enforce privacy rights to the full extent of the law.
PennyTrader22/11/2019 12:20

Highly dramatic and highly unenforceable.


Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. I've found complaining to the ICO does get things actioned, even if it takes a few months.
Good price, but worth paying the extra for the Ring doorbell pro.
Reiko922/11/2019 21:29

Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. …Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. I've found complaining to the ICO does get things actioned, even if it takes a few months.


Oh so your a whinger then - people just trying to protect what is rightfully there's and you go and snitch saying you are being watched etc privacy rights etc get a grip.

Loads of my neighbours know I have cctv and it actually makes them feel safer!! Explain that.
Edited by: "PennyTrader" 22nd Nov 2019
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:06

If these record anything outside your property (e.g. people walking past), …If these record anything outside your property (e.g. people walking past), do you have to put a sign up telling them about their rights under GDPR to make a Subject Access Request to you and what your privacy policy is?



Lol.
Reiko922/11/2019 21:29

Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. …Why do you say that? All it needs is one person to submit a complaint. I've found complaining to the ICO does get things actioned, even if it takes a few months.


Against an individual, not a business?


There are numerous exemptions for individuals using data for their own personal reasons.

If ICO come knocking, you can justify the recordings by saying it is for home security, you're part of a neighbourhood watch scheme, youve had anti social behaviour, etc.

Same could be argued for dash cams.
Onky difference is you now don't need to register with the ICO, so cheaper.
Edited by: "MrKrabs" 22nd Nov 2019
MrKrabs22/11/2019 21:42

Against an individual, not a business?There are numerous exemptions for …Against an individual, not a business?There are numerous exemptions for individuals using data for their own personal reasons.If ICO come knocking, you can justify the recordings by saying it is for home security, you're part of a neighbourhood watch scheme, youve had anti social behaviour, etc.Same could be argued for dash cams. Onky difference is you now don't need to register with the ICO, so cheaper.


Yes but you would need to show the ICO or the court your (prior written) documentation on your legal basis for collecting data outside your property, and either way the ICO say you need signage and to provide a quick response to any SARs.

It's just a minefield and a legal nightmare being a Data Controller now we have GDPR, and so it's best avoided by keeping cameras pointed down on your own land only as per the earlier post.
Edited by: "arCuThEDOWDr" 22nd Nov 2019
Is this a better deal than the pro version on here today??
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 21:55

Yes but you would need to show the ICO or the court your (prior written) …Yes but you would need to show the ICO or the court your (prior written) documentation on your legal basis for collecting data outside your property, and either way the ICO say you need signage and to provide a quick response to any SARs.It's just a minefield and a legal nightmare being a Data Controller now we have GDPR, and so it's best avoided by keeping cameras pointed down on your own land only as per the earlier post.


Can you confirm the following.

i) Every smartphone is a personsl video camera, for which the owner is the data controller.
ii) When the owner uses the smartphone beyond the boundary of their property, as a video camera, they must show signage and notification to that effect. So, filming your dog at the beach jumping in the sea after a ball, with some strangers milling around in the background, you're in breach of those people's data security?
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 21:55

Yes but you would need to show the ICO or the court your (prior written) …Yes but you would need to show the ICO or the court your (prior written) documentation on your legal basis for collecting data outside your property, and either way the ICO say you need signage and to provide a quick response to any SARs.It's just a minefield and a legal nightmare being a Data Controller now we have GDPR, and so it's best avoided by keeping cameras pointed down on your own land only as per the earlier post.


Well I'm keeping mine aimed so I can see faces. One paragraph will do it, why you're recording, see above, where - on blink servers, and for how long - up to 3 years can be argued quite easily.


A SAR could be refused on the grounds of being excessive or unfounded. If you have 10hours of CCTV you would not be expected as an individual to trawl through them, and likewise if an image they've requested also has another individual in the footage, you can also refuse to hand over if you unable to edit them out. That in itself is a response, and again the reasoning can be justified.

Court lol. You won't be going to court.

Just want to add I work day in day out with the data protection act as an information security officer and it influenced a large part of our isms manual for our ISO27001 accreditation. If mr Joe public wants to try his luck against me I'm pretty confident in my case.
Edited by: "MrKrabs" 22nd Nov 2019
Sulphur.Man22/11/2019 22:06

Can you confirm the following. i) Every smartphone is a personsl video …Can you confirm the following. i) Every smartphone is a personsl video camera, for which the owner is the data controller.ii) When the owner uses the smartphone beyond the boundary of their property, as a video camera, they must show signage and notification to that effect. So, filming your dog at the beach jumping in the sea after a ball, with some strangers milling around in the background, you're in breach of those people's data security?


I don't think in your example you would be a Data Controller, but better asking the ICO as it's their guidance I was quoting from.
Edited by: "arCuThEDOWDr" 22nd Nov 2019
Reiko922/11/2019 21:27

You are better off getting a traditional CCTV camera so that you can angle …You are better off getting a traditional CCTV camera so that you can angle it downwards. Then you can see who is at the door and also avoid recording outside your property and being subject to GDPR and other legal hassles.I know some of those cameras do have apps to let you view them but I don't know if any can be linked to a doorbell.If my neighbour got one of these Ring devices I'd definitely be looking to enforce privacy rights to the full extent of the law.


I’ve got a ezviz husky air as I wanted something like the ring doorbell where you can 2 way talk, but I didn’t want it reachable or just facing 1 way, records in hd, set up zone as to when it’s triggered (when someone enters my garden) and if I’m expecting a delivery I can 2 way talk to them if I’m out but want to give them instructions etc. I’m sure they have been discounted down to about £75-80 too 🕺
arCuThEDOWDr22/11/2019 11:45

The police deal with criminal matters, they don't deal with anyone …The police deal with criminal matters, they don't deal with anyone breaching GDPR. That is the job of the ICO and the civil courts. I'll check what the ICO say...


GDPR relate to personal information. You don't have face recognition to ID people passing by. Also it is not a CCTV camera so no need yo put up a signage.

My question is, it says 6 months free subscription included. Does this mean I need to pay monthly subscription in order to use the device with the app?
Forget GDPR, there are bigger problems, like this. I read some time ago that Ring will replace if stolen

What’s people’s experience of these that actually have them please ???

I have read a few reviews people stating things such as battery life is very poor and also when someone presses the doorbell it can be delayed going to a persons mobile - so by the time the person answers on the phone, the person at the door as already walked off ?

And yes as stated above, apparently these items are very easy to steal.
Edited by: "nick1981" 23rd Nov 2019
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