Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Rita Jadeja & Meera Jadeja - The Real Indian Cooking Kindle Edition - Free @ Amazon
627° Expired

Rita Jadeja & Meera Jadeja - The Real Indian Cooking Kindle Edition - Free @ Amazon

FREE£0.01Amazon Deals
37
Posted 11th Apr

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

This book is a step-by-step, easy to follow guide to genuine home-made 'real' Indian food. It goes through the various stages, assisted by clear pictures and instructions along the way to help you prepare the dishes. We wrote this book to help illustrate that although Indian food is packed with flavoursome herbs and spices, it is easy to make with the help of descriptive instructions.
The book includes dishes ranging from snacks, sweets to vegetarian and non-vegetarian.

3439871.jpg

Product details

Format: Kindle Edition
File Size: 2362 KB
Print Length: 184 pages
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
Language: English
ASIN: B00835VPDA
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray:
Not Enabled
Word Wise: Enabled
Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
For all those into Indian cooking bear in mind this is cent percent authentic kind of cooking guide. VERY authentic indeed. Not the modern day routine cooks turning into chefs and publishing books. The stuff in here is very much regional cooking, closer to the real Indian food and far far away from British Indian versions of Indian cooking. So if you’re into true taste of Indian cuisine this is a real good guide - an Indian.
polarbaba11/04/2020 20:21

Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind …Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind knowing some good Gujarati recipes !!


The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names specifically. The book is written in a Gujarati cuisine context. So you’re in for a treat. Their curries are especially very indulgent. I’m a Gujarati and a chef too so kind of able to vouch for the content here. I never get impressed by those so called chefs. But this I’d vote hot any day for its purity and closeness to real Indian food.
Jadeja !
40385747-rajsV.jpg

oh
37 Comments
Thanks.
For all those into Indian cooking bear in mind this is cent percent authentic kind of cooking guide. VERY authentic indeed. Not the modern day routine cooks turning into chefs and publishing books. The stuff in here is very much regional cooking, closer to the real Indian food and far far away from British Indian versions of Indian cooking. So if you’re into true taste of Indian cuisine this is a real good guide - an Indian.
Thank you.
agentfourty711/04/2020 20:15

For all those into Indian cooking bear in mind this is cent percent …For all those into Indian cooking bear in mind this is cent percent authentic kind of cooking guide. VERY authentic indeed. Not the modern day routine cooks turning into chefs and publishing books. The stuff in here is very much regional cooking, closer to the real Indian food and far far away from British Indian versions of Indian cooking. So if you’re into true taste of Indian cuisine this is a real good guide - an Indian.


Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind knowing some good Gujarati recipes !!
Thank you Boz Meister(ninja)
polarbaba11/04/2020 20:21

Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind …Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind knowing some good Gujarati recipes !!


The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names specifically. The book is written in a Gujarati cuisine context. So you’re in for a treat. Their curries are especially very indulgent. I’m a Gujarati and a chef too so kind of able to vouch for the content here. I never get impressed by those so called chefs. But this I’d vote hot any day for its purity and closeness to real Indian food.
agentfourty711/04/2020 20:27

The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names …The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names specifically. The book is written in a Gujarati cuisine context. So you’re in for a treat. Their curries are especially very indulgent. I’m a Gujarati and a chef too so kind of able to vouch for the content here. I never get impressed by those so called chefs. But this I’d vote hot any day for its purity and closeness to real Indian food.


I'll take your recommendation Agent Bhai!
polarbaba11/04/2020 20:21

Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind …Any particular region, as I've always loved Gujarati food!, Wouldn't mind knowing some good Gujarati recipes !!


If you check out the table of contents all the dish/items are also followed by their traditional Gujarati names inside the parenthesis ().
agentfourty711/04/2020 20:29

If you check out the table of contents all the dish/items are also …If you check out the table of contents all the dish/items are also followed by their traditional Gujarati names inside the parenthesis ().


I love a good dhokla, and daal kachoori... That's heaven right there!
Edited by: "polarbaba" 11th Apr
polarbaba11/04/2020 20:31

I love a good dhokla, and daal kachoori... That's heaven right there!


Please don’t mention them I’m craving a good Kachori right now. Might cook some up tomorrow now. Had Dhokla just this morning
agentfourty711/04/2020 20:32

Please don’t mention them I’m craving a good Kachori right now. Might cook …Please don’t mention them I’m craving a good Kachori right now. Might cook some up tomorrow now. Had Dhokla just this morning


Kachoori, samosa and bhajia!

That'll do it!
polarbaba11/04/2020 20:33

Kachoori, samosa and bhajia!That'll do it!


Fafda, Jelabi, Ghantia, Handvo the list goes on
Thanks Boz..
skip11211/04/2020 21:14

Fafda, Jelabi, Ghantia, Handvo the list goes on


Forgot Patra!.. come on!

I need a good recipe for undhiu! If you got one let me know. Something achievable without too many specialist ingredients, we dont all live in Leicester!
Edited by: "polarbaba" 11th Apr
polarbaba11/04/2020 21:47

Forgot Patra!.. come on!I need a good recipe for undhiu! If you got one …Forgot Patra!.. come on!I need a good recipe for undhiu! If you got one let me know. Something achievable without too many specialist ingredients, we dont all live in Leicester!


I would also appreciate a good undhiyu recepie too
polarbaba11/04/2020 21:47

Forgot Patra!.. come on!I need a good recipe for undhiu! If you got one …Forgot Patra!.. come on!I need a good recipe for undhiu! If you got one let me know. Something achievable without too many specialist ingredients, we dont all live in Leicester!


Haha Undhiyu is tricky but if you’ve got some ingredients at least then you can make it easily.
agentfourty711/04/2020 22:27

Haha Undhiyu is tricky but if you’ve got some ingredients at least then y …Haha Undhiyu is tricky but if you’ve got some ingredients at least then you can make it easily.


Go on..... I'm listening intently....
Jadeja !
40385747-rajsV.jpg

oh
agentfourty711/04/2020 20:27

The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names …The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names specifically. The book is written in a Gujarati cuisine context. So you’re in for a treat. Their curries are especially very indulgent. I’m a Gujarati and a chef too so kind of able to vouch for the content here. I never get impressed by those so called chefs. But this I’d vote hot any day for its purity and closeness to real Indian food.


If it's Gujrati, I'm guessing it's Vegetarian focused.(embarrassed)
someshpan11/04/2020 23:24

If it's Gujrati, I'm guessing it's Vegetarian focused.(embarrassed)


Has selection of non veg dishes
someshpan11/04/2020 23:24

If it's Gujrati, I'm guessing it's Vegetarian focused.(embarrassed)


That’s not a bad guess BUT authors come from a community of meat eaters. So they’ve written up some meat dishes in this book too
Thank you ,again !
agentfourty712/04/2020 03:10

That’s not a bad guess BUT authors come from a community of meat eaters. S …That’s not a bad guess BUT authors come from a community of meat eaters. So they’ve written up some meat dishes in this book too


Traditional Gujarati food is great for me (I'm a strict vegan)
agentfourty711/04/2020 20:27

The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names …The authors are traditionally Gujarati going by their names and last names specifically. The book is written in a Gujarati cuisine context. So you’re in for a treat. Their curries are especially very indulgent. I’m a Gujarati and a chef too so kind of able to vouch for the content here. I never get impressed by those so called chefs. But this I’d vote hot any day for its purity and closeness to real Indian food.


At last, something authentic! Thanks
polarbaba11/04/2020 22:29

Go on..... I'm listening intently....


Here made some today basic ingredients such as peanuts, sesame seeds, coconut desiccated, pigeon peas, aubergines, green garlic and some chickpea flour. Don’t be surprise by colour I like mine spicy so kind of added red chilli tempering.
40392411-2DT9L.jpg
agentfourty712/04/2020 17:51

Here made some today basic ingredients such as peanuts, sesame seeds, …Here made some today basic ingredients such as peanuts, sesame seeds, coconut desiccated, pigeon peas, aubergines, green garlic and some chickpea flour. Don’t be surprise by colour I like mine spicy so kind of added red chilli tempering. [Image]


Ah come on spill the daal, what's the recipe. I have all of those things at home.

Also do you make the ones with mathiya in them those dumplings are a game changer!.

I seriously need to be adopted by a Gujarati aunty and fed!. Lol!.
Edited by: "polarbaba" 12th Apr
polarbaba12/04/2020 17:53

Ah come on spill the daal, what's the recipe. I have all of those things …Ah come on spill the daal, what's the recipe. I have all of those things at home.Also do you make the ones with mathiya in them those dumplings are a game changer!.I seriously need to be adopted by a Gujarati aunty and fed!. Lol!.


Cannot do Undhiyu withou muthiya. They’re the soul of the dish but before I took that picture they were all picked and gone. Also recipe coming soon...kind busy enjoying my lunch you see
agentfourty712/04/2020 17:56

Cannot do Undhiyu withou muthiya. They’re the soul of the dish but before I …Cannot do Undhiyu withou muthiya. They’re the soul of the dish but before I took that picture they were all picked and gone. Also recipe coming soon...kind busy enjoying my lunch you see


I made a vegan Donner kebab, no pictures ... Wife and kids ( carnivores!) Came and ate it all!..... Monsters!.
polarbaba12/04/2020 17:58

I made a vegan Donner kebab, no pictures ... Wife and kids ( carnivores!) … I made a vegan Donner kebab, no pictures ... Wife and kids ( carnivores!) Came and ate it all!..... Monsters!.


Ooh you got my attention there. Lunch is on standby. Exchange recipes perhaps?
agentfourty712/04/2020 18:05

Ooh you got my attention there. Lunch is on standby. Exchange recipes …Ooh you got my attention there. Lunch is on standby. Exchange recipes perhaps?


Sure no problem. Although I'll warn you I don't have recipes, it's more like a chaotic intention that generally works out!.




Missus is the documenter and rule follower (she's a baker and cake maker).

Let me see what I used and put it down .. it was very very good, so it's definitely a keeper recipe.
Edited by: "polarbaba" 12th Apr
agentfourty712/04/2020 18:05

Ooh you got my attention there. Lunch is on standby. Exchange recipes …Ooh you got my attention there. Lunch is on standby. Exchange recipes perhaps?


I wanted to try a new marinade.
All my ingredients are vegan but you'll obviously use whatever you fancy.

I got regal brand steak and chops marinade mixed with yogurt to make the marinade.
I prepared some Quorn by marinating with liquid smoke and cooking it with garlic and ensuring I dried it a bit as I find it too mushy otherwise. And mixed with vivera brand kebab pieces kebab meat out of the packet without cooking.

Mixed with marinade and air fried in a foil basket (you may just stir fry with oil). And that bits ready .
I tried to go light as I wanted to see how good this marinade was.
Then prepared a chutney with yogurt, tamarind, chilli powder, mint, salt and sugar.

Then filled the mixture in a pitta bread with tomatoes, red onions and chutney. Could also add shredded cabbage for the real authentic English chip shop experience!.

Ate with home made spicy wedges.

And that's when the wife and kids noticed and raided my food!.

Marinade gets 10/10 from me!.

shopatregal.com/ste…ops




vivera.com/pro…ob/

This is a game changer and I know why it won awards.
polarbaba12/04/2020 20:08

I wanted to try a new marinade.All my ingredients are vegan but you'll … I wanted to try a new marinade.All my ingredients are vegan but you'll obviously use whatever you fancy. I got regal brand steak and chops marinade mixed with yogurt to make the marinade.I prepared some Quorn by marinating with liquid smoke and cooking it with garlic and ensuring I dried it a bit as I find it too mushy otherwise. And mixed with vivera brand kebab pieces kebab meat out of the packet without cooking.Mixed with marinade and air fried in a foil basket (you may just stir fry with oil). And that bits ready .I tried to go light as I wanted to see how good this marinade was.Then prepared a chutney with yogurt, tamarind, chilli powder, mint, salt and sugar.Then filled the mixture in a pitta bread with tomatoes, red onions and chutney. Could also add shredded cabbage for the real authentic English chip shop experience!.Ate with home made spicy wedges.And that's when the wife and kids noticed and raided my food!.Marinade gets 10/10 from me!.https://www.shopatregal.com/steak-chopshttps://vivera.com/product/vivera-plant-greek-kabob/This is a game changer and I know why it won awards.


Omg. This is heavenly. Just reading it tells it’ll be super quality. I’m going to try making it sometime next week if I get a slot on Tesco click and collect. For the Undhiyu however:

1) All or any vegetables fry them with generous oil and let them fry cook until nearly biteable. Leave these to drain oil in colander or over absorbent paper aka kitchen towel

2) Roughly crushed peanuts, sesame, coconut, green chilli, piece of ginger 1inch, coriander seeds/powder, some sugar (optional but traditionally used), tiny bit coriander, some 2-4 cloves garlic and give it a paste form in a blender. Add some oil and very little splash of water to avoid discolouring of it all and blend in to coarse paste.

60% job done by now.

3) For muthia: optional to add them. A cup of chickpea flour aka besan. Add some salt, pinch of baking powder (secret to my recipe), rub some oil into the flour at this stage (2tbsp) to make them crispy and scrumptious. Then add pinch of each coriander powder, chilli powder, turmeric, some dried fenugreek leaves aka methi, sesame seeds a pinch (optional) and some sugar (optional too). For this into a dough not very slimy. Pretty stiff-ish. Very important tips: (1) sieve your flour to avoid lumps, (2) roast the flour slightly for good aroma and taste (optional) and (3) add water VERY little by little or you’ll get a paste which is useless. So dough should be like ready to roll icing consistency that you get from supermarkets (this reference especially cos you said missus is a baker; so she’d know, also asking for her input here would get you brownie points from her )

(4) Get some healthy oil for cooking, add your paste and fry cook it for a bit, add drained veggies, some lemon juice, chopped coriander. Some water if it seems too dry. Adjust the consistency of the dish here based on how much curry paste to vegetables ratio you’ve got. More paste less vegetables is ideal. But personal choice too. Mix it to get desired texture.

(5) Make tiny bullet shape or any shape but tiny dumplings and fry them in neutral oil like rapeseed canola etc. Fry till golden brownish. Add them to your curry just before serving. Mix them in.

This dish is 100 years old at least, so traditionally cooked in clay pots over fire but here to add that texture let it simmer with lid on and tiny water sprinkled on lowest heat for 5mins at the end.

Enjoy Hope this is the kind you had in mind.
agentfourty712/04/2020 20:44

Omg. This is heavenly. Just reading it tells it’ll be super quality. I’m go …Omg. This is heavenly. Just reading it tells it’ll be super quality. I’m going to try making it sometime next week if I get a slot on Tesco click and collect. For the Undhiyu however:1) All or any vegetables fry them with generous oil and let them fry cook until nearly biteable. Leave these to drain oil in colander or over absorbent paper aka kitchen towel2) Roughly crushed peanuts, sesame, coconut, green chilli, piece of ginger 1inch, coriander seeds/powder, some sugar (optional but traditionally used), tiny bit coriander, some 2-4 cloves garlic and give it a paste form in a blender. Add some oil and very little splash of water to avoid discolouring of it all and blend in to coarse paste. 60% job done by now. 3) For muthia: optional to add them. A cup of chickpea flour aka besan. Add some salt, pinch of baking powder (secret to my recipe), rub some oil into the flour at this stage (2tbsp) to make them crispy and scrumptious. Then add pinch of each coriander powder, chilli powder, turmeric, some dried fenugreek leaves aka methi, sesame seeds a pinch (optional) and some sugar (optional too). For this into a dough not very slimy. Pretty stiff-ish. Very important tips: (1) sieve your flour to avoid lumps, (2) roast the flour slightly for good aroma and taste (optional) and (3) add water VERY little by little or you’ll get a paste which is useless. So dough should be like ready to roll icing consistency that you get from supermarkets (this reference especially cos you said missus is a baker; so she’d know, also asking for her input here would get you brownie points from her )(4) Get some healthy oil for cooking, add your paste and fry cook it for a bit, add drained veggies, some lemon juice, chopped coriander. Some water if it seems too dry. Adjust the consistency of the dish here based on how much curry paste to vegetables ratio you’ve got. More paste less vegetables is ideal. But personal choice too. Mix it to get desired texture. (5) Make tiny bullet shape or any shape but tiny dumplings and fry them in neutral oil like rapeseed canola etc. Fry till golden brownish. Add them to your curry just before serving. Mix them in. This dish is 100 years old at least, so traditionally cooked in clay pots over fire but here to add that texture let it simmer with lid on and tiny water sprinkled on lowest heat for 5mins at the end. Enjoy Hope this is the kind you had in mind.


100% Vegan too btw.
agentfourty712/04/2020 20:44

Omg. This is heavenly. Just reading it tells it’ll be super quality. I’m go …Omg. This is heavenly. Just reading it tells it’ll be super quality. I’m going to try making it sometime next week if I get a slot on Tesco click and collect. For the Undhiyu however:1) All or any vegetables fry them with generous oil and let them fry cook until nearly biteable. Leave these to drain oil in colander or over absorbent paper aka kitchen towel2) Roughly crushed peanuts, sesame, coconut, green chilli, piece of ginger 1inch, coriander seeds/powder, some sugar (optional but traditionally used), tiny bit coriander, some 2-4 cloves garlic and give it a paste form in a blender. Add some oil and very little splash of water to avoid discolouring of it all and blend in to coarse paste. 60% job done by now. 3) For muthia: optional to add them. A cup of chickpea flour aka besan. Add some salt, pinch of baking powder (secret to my recipe), rub some oil into the flour at this stage (2tbsp) to make them crispy and scrumptious. Then add pinch of each coriander powder, chilli powder, turmeric, some dried fenugreek leaves aka methi, sesame seeds a pinch (optional) and some sugar (optional too). For this into a dough not very slimy. Pretty stiff-ish. Very important tips: (1) sieve your flour to avoid lumps, (2) roast the flour slightly for good aroma and taste (optional) and (3) add water VERY little by little or you’ll get a paste which is useless. So dough should be like ready to roll icing consistency that you get from supermarkets (this reference especially cos you said missus is a baker; so she’d know, also asking for her input here would get you brownie points from her )(4) Get some healthy oil for cooking, add your paste and fry cook it for a bit, add drained veggies, some lemon juice, chopped coriander. Some water if it seems too dry. Adjust the consistency of the dish here based on how much curry paste to vegetables ratio you’ve got. More paste less vegetables is ideal. But personal choice too. Mix it to get desired texture. (5) Make tiny bullet shape or any shape but tiny dumplings and fry them in neutral oil like rapeseed canola etc. Fry till golden brownish. Add them to your curry just before serving. Mix them in. This dish is 100 years old at least, so traditionally cooked in clay pots over fire but here to add that texture let it simmer with lid on and tiny water sprinkled on lowest heat for 5mins at the end. Enjoy Hope this is the kind you had in mind.


Looks like I have to try this tomorrow if possible, daughter might not let me have any.. she likes undhiu more than me!

What veggies you recommend?

Do you use plantains?
polarbaba12/04/2020 21:06

Looks like I have to try this tomorrow if possible, daughter might not let …Looks like I have to try this tomorrow if possible, daughter might not let me have any.. she likes undhiu more than me!What veggies you recommend?Do you use plantains?


Yeah I used an alternative of plantains - raw green bananas with skin on. Very meaty when cooked. Aubergines, pigeon peas, baby potatoes, plantains, sweet potato, yam are basic ones. You can add other starchy veggies into it like any gourds, any beans.
agentfourty712/04/2020 21:09

Yeah I used an alternative of plantains - raw green bananas with skin on. …Yeah I used an alternative of plantains - raw green bananas with skin on. Very meaty when cooked. Aubergines, pigeon peas, baby potatoes, plantains, sweet potato, yam are basic ones. You can add other starchy veggies into it like any gourds, any beans.


Nice!!
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text