Roberts RECORD R White - DAB/FM Digital Portable Radio with Recording Function, Pause and Rewind Feature  @ coopelectrical.  Now £53.99
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Roberts RECORD R White - DAB/FM Digital Portable Radio with Recording Function, Pause and Rewind Feature @ coopelectrical. Now £53.99

24
Found 7th Mar 2015
Use code FRD10 for this price. Free Delivery

The Roberts Record R is a fantastic DAB/FM radio that offers many convenient features like Pause Plus to rewind the live radio or recording onto SD card function, so you could listen to your favourite programmes whenever you like.
With Record R you can record DAB and uniquely FM radio onto an SD card and play it back whenever you want. You can also listen to MP3/WMA/AAC files from the SD card. Thanks to "Pause Plus" and "Rewind" features you will be able to pause or rewind live radio for up to 60 minutes.
The Roberts Record R digital radio comes also with a headphone socket that allows you to listen to your favourite radio program in private and an Aux in port means that you can connect an MP3 player or smartphone and listen to your music files through the quality speakers.

The Roberts Record R also features a clock with multi-function alarms (mains only) - sleep, snooze and nap functions what makes it a perfect choice for the bedside table.

24 Comments

Thanks. Just ordered..code works fine and Quidco at 2% too..HOT

Cracking price for a Roberts.

I paid twice the price for mine a few years back & can recommend it. The only slight downside is the sleep function doesn't have a one touch button, but has to be accessed via a menu, but it is there if you need it.

Record Dab....Here Grandpa....Happy Birthday

A lot of reviews mention poor sound quality. One said it records in mp2format rather than mp3.

lilacjumper

A lot of reviews mention poor sound quality. One said it records in … A lot of reviews mention poor sound quality. One said it records in mp2format rather than mp3.



DAB is broadcast in mp2; it's just saving the original source.

Ah I didn't realise DAB was broadcast in mp2. Does this have any impact on manipulating recordings? For example if I wanted to play them back on a different player would it cause any issues?

lilacjumper

Ah I didn't realise DAB was broadcast in mp2. Does this have any impact … Ah I didn't realise DAB was broadcast in mp2. Does this have any impact on manipulating recordings? For example if I wanted to play them back on a different player would it cause any issues?


Just tried an mp2 made on the radio in the car MP3 player & it did not recognise them, however mp2 plays on all computer programmes I have used & if a problem should be easily converted, that said it does record FM beautifully in wav, again can be easily converted to MP3
Edited by: "HOTPOT" 8th Mar 2015

Audacity, for example, will open and play MP2 audio. MP2 (or MPEG-1 Audio Layer II to give it the proper name) is arguably better sounding than MP3 (or MPEG-1 Audio Layer III to give it the proper name) as it doesn’t have to cater for such extreme compression which MP3 requires in order to achieve smaller file sizes. MP3 therefore involves more radical acoustic masking to get rid of a lot of audio detail you wouldn’t have been able to discriminate. MP2 is a standard way of handling audio in broadcast and other areas.

49.99 at ebay @ 123 Electrical (300+sold)

MPEG_Streamclip is a fairly easy to use Freeware utility that allows you to convert MP2 files to MP3 or other formats in batch.
squared5.com/svi…tml

Incidentally, I’ve more or less switched back from DAB to FM on all our DAB radios scattered about the house — better reception and end quality in most cases. The other thing is, if you want a good digital receiver for generally available mainstream radio stations, and you’re concerned about good sound quality, and so on, avoid DAB altogether and go for a Freeview receiver to listen to radio on. In terms of bandwidth, DAB is quite low (even though the Beeb DAB stations are higher than most commercial ones). Internet streaming radio is higher, and should be an improvement. Freesat (satellite) is high too, but not as high as one might think. It turns out that Freeview (terrestrial) is amazingly high, and often works out to be about the highest bandwidth, highest quality path from origin to reception one can easily get, and in most cases, it’s already sitting there in the house already paid for! Plus, you can record it easily, if it’s a Freeview recorder.

u0421793

Incidentally, I’ve more or less switched back from DAB to FM on all our D … Incidentally, I’ve more or less switched back from DAB to FM on all our DAB radios scattered about the house — better reception and end quality in most cases. The other thing is, if you want a good digital receiver for generally available mainstream radio stations, and you’re concerned about good sound quality, and so on, avoid DAB altogether and go for a Freeview receiver to listen to radio on. In terms of bandwidth, DAB is quite low (even though the Beeb DAB stations are higher than most commercial ones). Internet streaming radio is higher, and should be an improvement. Freesat (satellite) is high too, but not as high as one might think. It turns out that Freeview (terrestrial) is amazingly high, and often works out to be about the highest bandwidth, highest quality path from origin to reception one can easily get, and in most cases, it’s already sitting there in the house already paid for! Plus, you can record it easily, if it’s a Freeview recorder.



Can you transfer it to wav or mp3, other than real time.

Doesn't look like it supports DAB+, at least on of the bidders for the new dab licence has DAB+ stations included in it bid

u0421793

Incidentally, I’ve more or less switched back from DAB to FM on all our D … Incidentally, I’ve more or less switched back from DAB to FM on all our DAB radios scattered about the house — better reception and end quality in most cases. The other thing is, if you want a good digital receiver for generally available mainstream radio stations, and you’re concerned about good sound quality, and so on, avoid DAB altogether and go for a Freeview receiver to listen to radio on. In terms of bandwidth, DAB is quite low (even though the Beeb DAB stations are higher than most commercial ones). Internet streaming radio is higher, and should be an improvement. Freesat (satellite) is high too, but not as high as one might think. It turns out that Freeview (terrestrial) is amazingly high, and often works out to be about the highest bandwidth, highest quality path from origin to reception one can easily get, and in most cases, it’s already sitting there in the house already paid for! Plus, you can record it easily, if it’s a Freeview recorder.


Really interesting points you make. If its true what your saying (cue those who wish to dispute it) then I'm done with even considering one of these. Not that I was ever convinced before you made your interesting/educational statement. Thanks

There is nothing much wrong with dab in a non moving and good aerial situations just the implementation of it like hd tv the quality is brought down to a minium quality for commercial reasons,it's a pity we can't see and hear the best that could be technically be available but they have to pay there way,just a pity.

True. The transport of data is a costly thing in broadcasting. Getting data or programme material from production up to transmission doesn’t come free, and is often the first sacrifice of a commercial station is the actual bandwidth of the data, shaved down by cutting the bit rate or dynamic range or both.

I can’t remember where I did my research into quality of Freeview, but here’s something: http://www.radioswitch.co.uk/dab-radio-vs-freeview-radio.html
http://www.whathifi.com/forum/hi-fi/freeview-box-sound-quality
http://www.s296576215.websitehome.co.uk/digitalradio.html

Bear in mind that things change, so comparisons made a decade or so ago may not represent what the situation is now.

u0421793

True. The transport of data is a costly thing in broadcasting. Getting … True. The transport of data is a costly thing in broadcasting. Getting data or programme material from production up to transmission doesn’t come free, and is often the first sacrifice of a commercial station is the actual bandwidth of the data, shaved down by cutting the bit rate or dynamic range or both.I can’t remember where I did my research into quality of Freeview, but here’s something: http://www.radioswitch.co.uk/dab-radio-vs-freeview-radio.htmlhttp://www.whathifi.com/forum/hi-fi/freeview-box-sound-qualityhttp://www.s296576215.websitehome.co.uk/digitalradio.htmlBear in mind that things change, so comparisons made a decade or so ago may not represent what the situation is now.


Simple answer. Cut down all these radio stations that play exactly the same music to say two. Put out a few stations that play music for all tastes. Less stations, more people happy & better bandwidth thus better sound. Simples.

Not quite, how would so much money get made? The purpose of a commercial radio station is to deliver your ears to advertisers. The more channels, the more different and diverse advertisements can be concurrently carried rather than just one or two different ads per broadcaster at any one time, and therefore more income streams can be obtained from advertisers. I suppose the next step is +1 stations in case you missed it an hour ago, and therefore duplicate advertising revenue for the same work.

The beeb, on the other hand…

u0421793

In terms of bandwidth... Freeview (terrestrial) is amazingly high, and … In terms of bandwidth... Freeview (terrestrial) is amazingly high, and often works out to be about the highest bandwidth, highest quality path from origin to reception one can easily get, and in most cases, it’s already sitting there in the house already paid for! Plus, you can record it easily, if it’s a Freeview recorder.



Very true - and you can pick up old SD boxes for a tenner - HD not required for audio. Research first if you can, as many don't let you record radio at all. Old Humaxes are my favourites and there are forums full of info on how to transfer progs off to PCs or devices.

YouView was excellent for radio, with full iPlayer catchup on top of record, but the beeb pulled support on cost grounds.

woodface7

Very true - and you can pick up old SD boxes for a tenner - HD not … Very true - and you can pick up old SD boxes for a tenner - HD not required for audio. Research first if you can, as many don't let you record radio at all. Old Humaxes are my favourites and there are forums full of info on how to transfer progs off to PCs or devices. YouView was excellent for radio, with full iPlayer catchup on top of record, but the beeb pulled support on cost grounds.



Hi woodface7

can you expand on that YouView iPlayer line ?

not sure exactly what you meant, do you mean the radio aspect has been dropped from YouView iPlayer ?

thanks

cherylcole

Hi woodface7can you expand on that YouView iPlayer line ?not sure exactly … Hi woodface7can you expand on that YouView iPlayer line ?not sure exactly what you meant, do you mean the radio aspect has been dropped from YouView iPlayer ?thanks



BBC cuts meant they quietly axed lesser used radio catch-up platforms like YouView in the Autumn.

Still a useful audio recorder with a full EPG that includes the major commercial networks. But it was great to be able to use that left button like a time machine to bring up any BBC Radio prog from the last 7 days, without searching through menus like in iPlayer. All progs in the time and place on the schedule you're either familiar with, or know when it was you caught part of something you want to hear the whole of.

And the current YouView box is so small, you can squeeze one and a TV into a kitchen - even when you only want audio. (Who can cook while watching TV?)

HOTPOT

Can you transfer it to wav or mp3, other than real time.


Yes, converter- lite which is a free program, I use it all the time and will convert many different formats of audio and video. Very easy to use as well.
Edited by: "porca" 15th Mar 2015

porca

Yes, converter- lite which is a free program, I use it all the time and … Yes, converter- lite which is a free program, I use it all the time and will convert many different formats of audio and video. Very easy to use as well.


Thanks.
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