Roku Premiere 4K/HDR Streaming Media Player - £28.49 Delivered @ Currys / eBay
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Roku Premiere 4K/HDR Streaming Media Player - £28.49 Delivered @ Currys / eBay

£28.49£29.995% Free P&P FreeeBay Deals
41
Posted 21st MayEdited by:"merb0786"
Decent price for this 4K streaming device, currently reduced to £29.99 at most retailers - however you can purchase for £28.49 delivered as 5% discount will auto-apply at checkout via Currys eBay site.

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  • Streams HD, 4K Ultra HD, and HDR with sharp detail and vivid color
  • Setup is easy with the included Premium HDMI cable, simple remote and intuitive home screen
  • Enjoy live TV, news, sports, movies and TV episodes on thousands of free and paid channels like Netflix, BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub, All4, Disney+, Prime Video, NOW TV and many more
  • Enjoy an always fresh selection of free movies, TV, kids entertainment and more on The Roku Channel
  • Easily search across top channels to see where you can stream shows for free or at the lowest cost
  • Use features like voice search, private listening, cast music & photos to your TV, and an extra remote with the free Roku mobile app (iOS & Android)

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I recently picked up a Roku Streaming Stick+ from Curry’s eBay. I got it cheap as had a discount from eBay.

Streaming Stick+ is 4K and (supposedly) supports HDR. The remote for this Roku also has power and volume buttons.

Although I prefer the Roku remote (well at least the version with power and volume controls) the quality of the FireStick 4K is just so much better.

HDR doesn’t seem to work very well. I can certainly notice a much better picture on the FireStick. The voice search on the Roku is also very basic and Netflix integration is quite poor.

I am actually quite disappointed and would probably send it back if it wasn’t so cheap.

I have a Synology Nas running Plex and the FireStick 4K will play anything without Transcoding. The Roku really struggles with anything above 1080p and it isn’t as equipped as the FireStick with the audio codecs it supports.

I’m not a FireStick fan boy (I’m bored of the whole FireStick UI and the Amazon Everything approach) and wanted to try something else and potentially move away from the FireStick, but at the end of the day, the FireStick 4K is just much, much better than the Roku.
Edited by: "justadam" 21st May
41 Comments
How do these compare to fire stick/now tv stick?
Can you connect a HArd drive to it using the usb ? Edited
Edited by: "ashman33" 21st May
xshelleyx21/05/2020 14:38

How do these compare to fire stick/now tv stick?


Better than Now TV and I would say on par with amazon. Roku has more apps.
Denney_Masters21/05/2020 15:14

Better than Now TV and I would say on par with amazon. Roku has more apps.


Thanks. My 2012 LG TV no longer supports the ape. I have a BT box with limited apps and Now TV app is really glitchy freezes also it doesn’t have disney plus (which we have 6 months trial with o2 sim only contract). Also have Netflix.

All I want is to have Now TV/Netflix/Disney Plus in the same place! Would be nice to be able to play Apple Music through the surround sound too?
xshelleyx21/05/2020 15:20

Thanks. My 2012 LG TV no longer supports the ape. I have a BT box with …Thanks. My 2012 LG TV no longer supports the ape. I have a BT box with limited apps and Now TV app is really glitchy freezes also it doesn’t have disney plus (which we have 6 months trial with o2 sim only contract). Also have Netflix. All I want is to have Now TV/Netflix/Disney Plus in the same place! Would be nice to be able to play Apple Music through the surround sound too?


So yes Roku has Now TV, Netflix and Disney plus. It doesnt have apple muic though. Amazon don't support Now TV. Roku might be your best choice.
Roku is better than the equivalently priced firestick. Very fast and a good selection. The firestick gradually gets slower and has a bunch of bloatware and amazon spyware.
mr_johnsie21/05/2020 16:07

Roku is better than the equivalently priced firestick. Very fast and a …Roku is better than the equivalently priced firestick. Very fast and a good selection. The firestick gradually gets slower and has a bunch of bloatware and amazon spyware.


Thanks will for the Roku I think.
I’ve got this and the Amazon 4K one. I prefer the Amazon one as it lets you control the TV volume from the Amazon remote. Plus it doesn’t have the annoying adverts that the Roku has on the main screen.

I don’t have Now TV so not having that isn’t an issue for me. If the Roku didn’t have adverts and had volume control then it’d be perfect.
Edited by: "patrick_000" 21st May
I recently picked up a Roku Streaming Stick+ from Curry’s eBay. I got it cheap as had a discount from eBay.

Streaming Stick+ is 4K and (supposedly) supports HDR. The remote for this Roku also has power and volume buttons.

Although I prefer the Roku remote (well at least the version with power and volume controls) the quality of the FireStick 4K is just so much better.

HDR doesn’t seem to work very well. I can certainly notice a much better picture on the FireStick. The voice search on the Roku is also very basic and Netflix integration is quite poor.

I am actually quite disappointed and would probably send it back if it wasn’t so cheap.

I have a Synology Nas running Plex and the FireStick 4K will play anything without Transcoding. The Roku really struggles with anything above 1080p and it isn’t as equipped as the FireStick with the audio codecs it supports.

I’m not a FireStick fan boy (I’m bored of the whole FireStick UI and the Amazon Everything approach) and wanted to try something else and potentially move away from the FireStick, but at the end of the day, the FireStick 4K is just much, much better than the Roku.
Edited by: "justadam" 21st May
Bought this last week for a similar price, excellent piece of kit.

Considered a Firestick, but my experience with the UI on a Fire tab put me off.
justadam21/05/2020 17:33

I recently picked up a Roku Streaming Stick+ from Curry’s eBay. I got it c …I recently picked up a Roku Streaming Stick+ from Curry’s eBay. I got it cheap as had a discount from eBay.Streaming Stick+ is 4K and (supposedly) supports HDR. The remote for this Roku also has power and volume buttons.Although I prefer the Roku remote (well at least the version with power and volume controls) the quality of the FireStick 4K is just so much better.HDR doesn’t seem to work very well. I can certainly notice a much better picture on the FireStick. The voice search on the Roku is also very basic and Netflix integration is quite poor.I am actually quite disappointed and would probably send it back if it wasn’t so cheap.I have a Synology Nas running Plex and the FireStick 4K will play anything without Transcoding. The Roku really struggles with anything above 1080p and it isn’t as equipped as the FireStick with the audio codecs it supports.I’m not a FireStick fan boy (I’m bored of the whole FireStick UI and the Amazon Everything approach) and wanted to try something else and potentially move away from the FireStick, but at the end of the day, the FireStick 4K is just much, much better than the Roku.



It wasn't a Roku premiere though was it?
Prefer the Rokus myself - I have the streaming stick and one of these boxes and so much easier to use

The Amazon firestick was just too fussy for me, but I know it’s decent for those who like adding their own apps etc
patrick_00021/05/2020 16:20

I’ve got this and the Amazon 4K one. I prefer the Amazon one as it lets y …I’ve got this and the Amazon 4K one. I prefer the Amazon one as it lets you control the TV volume from the Amazon remote. Plus it doesn’t have the annoying adverts that the Roku has on the main screen.I don’t have Now TV so not having that isn’t an issue for me. If the Roku didn’t have adverts and had volume control then it’d be perfect.


Doesn’t have annoying adverts? The Fire TV autoplays adverts on the home screen. Yes, they are for content and apps on the device, but they are adverts and they are annoying!
do not buy cheap quality bad software would recommend fire stick more when it is on offer for £29
I have a Roku streaming stick + that I got for £30 when on offer. The + version has a volume control and I can use NowTV so a better choice than Firestick for me. The lack of volume put me off the Premiere version
Edited by: "2manymilos" 23rd May
2manymilos23/05/2020 13:40

I have a Roku streaming stick + that I got for £30 when on offer. The + …I have a Roku streaming stick + that I got for £30 when on offer. The + version has a volume control and I can use NowTV so a better choice than Firestick for me. The lack of volume put me off the Premiere version


The plus version also has the 5Ghz AC wireless which is would rather prefer for a Plex setup rather than legacy 2G wireless.
Edited by: "LordMetro" 23rd May
Considering how much better the Amazon Firestick is to this I can't understand how thy still sell any.
xshelleyx21/05/2020 15:20

Thanks. My 2012 LG TV no longer supports the ape. I have a BT box with …Thanks. My 2012 LG TV no longer supports the ape. I have a BT box with limited apps and Now TV app is really glitchy freezes also it doesn’t have disney plus (which we have 6 months trial with o2 sim only contract). Also have Netflix. All I want is to have Now TV/Netflix/Disney Plus in the same place! Would be nice to be able to play Apple Music through the surround sound too?


My now tv has disney plus
retrend23/05/2020 13:01

It wasn't a Roku premiere though was it?


No I got a Roku Streaming Stick+ (4K)which is superior to the Premiere in terms of features.
mr_johnsie21/05/2020 16:07

Roku is better than the equivalently priced firestick. Very fast and a …Roku is better than the equivalently priced firestick. Very fast and a good selection. The firestick gradually gets slower and has a bunch of bloatware and amazon spyware.


Pray do tell where you got that info ? Would be interesting to read the article.
LordMetro23/05/2020 14:12

The plus version also has the 5Ghz AC wireless which is would rather …The plus version also has the 5Ghz AC wireless which is would rather prefer for a Plex setup rather than legacy 2G wireless.


Have you never looked into wireless bands ? 2.4ghz is predominantly better than 5ghz.
Dominatez23/05/2020 15:15

Have you never looked into wireless bands ? 2.4ghz is predominantly better …Have you never looked into wireless bands ? 2.4ghz is predominantly better than 5ghz.


Yes I was one of the first testers working on the projects of unlocking Linksys Smart WiFi for DD-WRT.

5Ghz gives us a much better speeds compared to 2Ghz. There's usually about 1300mbps on your consumer grade AC routers at 80mhz.

2g has a speed of 300mbps (802.11n) only when you use channel bonding between two channels (20mhz + 20 mhz). This is typically very bad as it causes much more wireless interference in the 2G bands. The 2Ghz spectrum isn't even limited to WiFi but other devices like your usb wireless mouse, baby monitors and I believe ZigBee protocols as well (smart meters, hue devices).

5Ghz also has much more channels and channel bonding is beneficial on 5Ghz - there's no major interference sources and if there was a influx of routers, more channels are available - it just makes sense. There's upper and lower channel configs and you can always use DFS channels to use more available channels with restricting the power for radars to function as normal.

Newer AC routers also support MU-MIMO giving individual streams to each decice.

The benefits of using 2G isn't really any other than the obvious range increase as the wavelength increases when the frequency is lower (basic high school physics concept).

In this day and age the 2Ghz spectrum is congested heavily, the 5Ghz spectrum is less so and the speed benefits will definitely improve the NAS speeds between the client and the server making buffer less of an issue. In my flat 2Ghz live TV through Plex kept on dropping packets as there's literally over 20 or so routers around - on the 5Ghz band there's only a few and most are the casual ISP ones which usually take the U-NII-1 (36-48) range, where I will use the upper channel config for U-NII-2 and 3 (52-165) supported by my broadcom chip.

Anyways WiFi 6 AX will be the future - its potential throughput is around 9.6gbps compared to 6.9gbps on AC. It handles power efficiency pretty well compared to AC and the channel width has increased from 80mhz to 160mhz.

So now I'm interested as to why legacy solutions like 802.11n 2G is superior to 802.11n/802.11ac 5G? I've had no problems in my flat for range on both bands, the furthest room gives me a throughput of about 866mbps compared to my 1600mbps which is completely fine. Obviously everyone has their own WiFi solution and their house may be of concrete instead of brick or more insulation etc which can block out signals. I use ZigBee in my house and try to refrain from all devices using 2G.
LordMetro23/05/2020 15:38

Yes I was one of the first testers working on the projects of unlocking …Yes I was one of the first testers working on the projects of unlocking Linksys Smart WiFi for DD-WRT.5Ghz gives us a much better speeds compared to 2Ghz. There's usually about 1300mbps on your consumer grade AC routers at 80mhz.2g has a speed of 300mbps (802.11n) only when you use channel bonding between two channels (20mhz + 20 mhz). This is typically very bad as it causes much more wireless interference in the 2G bands. The 2Ghz spectrum isn't even limited to WiFi but other devices like your usb wireless mouse, baby monitors and I believe ZigBee protocols as well (smart meters, hue devices).5Ghz also has much more channels and channel bonding is beneficial on 5Ghz - there's no major interference sources and if there was a influx of routers, more channels are available - it just makes sense. There's upper and lower channel configs and you can always use DFS channels to use more available channels with restricting the power for radars to function as normal.Newer AC routers also support MU-MIMO giving individual streams to each decice.The benefits of using 2G isn't really any other than the obvious range increase as the wavelength increases when the frequency is lower (basic high school physics concept).In this day and age the 2Ghz spectrum is congested heavily, the 5Ghz spectrum is less so and the speed benefits will definitely improve the NAS speeds between the client and the server making buffer less of an issue. In my flat 2Ghz live TV through Plex kept on dropping packets as there's literally over 20 or so routers around - on the 5Ghz band there's only a few and most are the casual ISP ones which usually take the U-NII-1 (36-48) range, where I will use the upper channel config for U-NII-2 and 3 (52-165) supported by my broadcom chip.Anyways WiFi 6 AX will be the future - its potential throughput is around 9.6gbps compared to 6.9gbps on AC. It handles power efficiency pretty well compared to AC and the channel width has increased from 80mhz to 160mhz.So now I'm interested as to why legacy solutions like 802.11n 2G is superior to 802.11n/802.11ac 5G? I've had no problems in my flat for range on both bands, the furthest room gives me a throughput of about 866mbps compared to my 1600mbps which is completely fine. Obviously everyone has their own WiFi solution and their house may be of concrete instead of brick or more insulation etc which can block out signals. I use ZigBee in my house and try to refrain from all devices using 2G.


Well written sir. I was just referring to the fact that although 5ghz is faster, 2.4ghz has a better coverage and gets through the walls at home with a better success rate than 5ghz will. That's why I used to always use 2.4ghz at home until I bought a fairly decent wifi extender, as we all know that pretty much ever router an ISP gives you when you join is a pile of tosh.
LordMetro23/05/2020 15:38

Yes I was one of the first testers working on the projects of unlocking …Yes I was one of the first testers working on the projects of unlocking Linksys Smart WiFi for DD-WRT.5Ghz gives us a much better speeds compared to 2Ghz. There's usually about 1300mbps on your consumer grade AC routers at 80mhz.2g has a speed of 300mbps (802.11n) only when you use channel bonding between two channels (20mhz + 20 mhz). This is typically very bad as it causes much more wireless interference in the 2G bands. The 2Ghz spectrum isn't even limited to WiFi but other devices like your usb wireless mouse, baby monitors and I believe ZigBee protocols as well (smart meters, hue devices).5Ghz also has much more channels and channel bonding is beneficial on 5Ghz - there's no major interference sources and if there was a influx of routers, more channels are available - it just makes sense. There's upper and lower channel configs and you can always use DFS channels to use more available channels with restricting the power for radars to function as normal.Newer AC routers also support MU-MIMO giving individual streams to each decice.The benefits of using 2G isn't really any other than the obvious range increase as the wavelength increases when the frequency is lower (basic high school physics concept).In this day and age the 2Ghz spectrum is congested heavily, the 5Ghz spectrum is less so and the speed benefits will definitely improve the NAS speeds between the client and the server making buffer less of an issue. In my flat 2Ghz live TV through Plex kept on dropping packets as there's literally over 20 or so routers around - on the 5Ghz band there's only a few and most are the casual ISP ones which usually take the U-NII-1 (36-48) range, where I will use the upper channel config for U-NII-2 and 3 (52-165) supported by my broadcom chip.Anyways WiFi 6 AX will be the future - its potential throughput is around 9.6gbps compared to 6.9gbps on AC. It handles power efficiency pretty well compared to AC and the channel width has increased from 80mhz to 160mhz.So now I'm interested as to why legacy solutions like 802.11n 2G is superior to 802.11n/802.11ac 5G? I've had no problems in my flat for range on both bands, the furthest room gives me a throughput of about 866mbps compared to my 1600mbps which is completely fine. Obviously everyone has their own WiFi solution and their house may be of concrete instead of brick or more insulation etc which can block out signals. I use ZigBee in my house and try to refrain from all devices using 2G.


Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

I love the idea of DD-WRT and (I think it's called) OpenWRT. I'm thinking of sending off my old BT HomeHub 5A to an eBayer who does the conversion. Though I'll probably end up with too many config options and not know what to set.
Does this have Apple TV on
Can you side load apps like the Firestick? Ie: IPTV etc.
Dominatez23/05/2020 16:05

Well written sir. I was just referring to the fact that although 5ghz is …Well written sir. I was just referring to the fact that although 5ghz is faster, 2.4ghz has a better coverage and gets through the walls at home with a better success rate than 5ghz will. That's why I used to always use 2.4ghz at home until I bought a fairly decent wifi extender, as we all know that pretty much ever router an ISP gives you when you join is a pile of tosh.


I agree thanks
kalico23/05/2020 16:06

Thank you for sharing your knowledge.I love the idea of DD-WRT and (I …Thank you for sharing your knowledge.I love the idea of DD-WRT and (I think it's called) OpenWRT. I'm thinking of sending off my old BT HomeHub 5A to an eBayer who does the conversion. Though I'll probably end up with too many config options and not know what to set.


I used to mod those BT Home Hubs with OpenWRT as well - I'd say it's fairly simple with a soldering iron but I used to undercut those eBay sellers on purpose as they're just making a profit out of buyers.

They'd bid on homehub 5's for £5 and resell it for £20. I'd use to do it for a tenner plus postage

In my honest opinion, they're pretty good as a basic setup. But they used closed source drivers so there's no hardware acceleration - they suffer from a WAN to LAN speed issue being limited to about 100ish Mbps - the gigabit Ethernet ports aren't really gigabit. They're perfect if you are using with any UK ISP provider as we don't get over 100 anyway
Edited by: "LordMetro" 23rd May
The best streaming device without a doubt are the nvidia shields. They cost a lot but its just the best faultless device there is and I've tried them all, except apple because I'm not locking myself buying into that particular ecosystem.
Ordered from Amazon for slightly more £29.98. Easier to return if any issues
kalico23/05/2020 16:06

Thank you for sharing your knowledge.I love the idea of DD-WRT and (I …Thank you for sharing your knowledge.I love the idea of DD-WRT and (I think it's called) OpenWRT. I'm thinking of sending off my old BT HomeHub 5A to an eBayer who does the conversion. Though I'll probably end up with too many config options and not know what to set.



I've struggled with the ddwrt options, there's a build called gargoyle that is based on it but more for home users. It's got everything I need and is really as simple as router software that's s got uses comes.
Huge discount
LordMetro23/05/2020 17:39

I used to mod those BT Home Hubs with OpenWRT as well - I'd say it's …I used to mod those BT Home Hubs with OpenWRT as well - I'd say it's fairly simple with a soldering iron but I used to undercut those eBay sellers on purpose as they're just making a profit out of buyers.They'd bid on homehub 5's for £5 and resell it for £20. I'd use to do it for a tenner plus postage In my honest opinion, they're pretty good as a basic setup. But they used closed source drivers so there's no hardware acceleration - they suffer from a WAN to LAN speed issue being limited to about 100ish Mbps - the gigabit Ethernet ports aren't really gigabit. They're perfect if you are using with any UK ISP provider as we don't get over 100 anyway


Thanks for the steer.

Actually I'm very competent soldering so I might have a go myself. I'm sure there will be instructions on the net somewhere, so thank you for the confidence.

I run my whole home from 4G data, so the WAN/LAN speed isn't an issue. It's more that, internally, devices connecting via a hub that's just an old Android phone, isn't the best. Difficult for Plex and a Chromecast won't play ball at all. Let alone if I wanted to setup a server accessible from outside the home.
kalico24/05/2020 07:09

Thanks for the steer.Actually I'm very competent soldering so I might have …Thanks for the steer.Actually I'm very competent soldering so I might have a go myself. I'm sure there will be instructions on the net somewhere, so thank you for the confidence.I run my whole home from 4G data, so the WAN/LAN speed isn't an issue. It's more that, internally, devices connecting via a hub that's just an old Android phone, isn't the best. Difficult for Plex and a Chromecast won't play ball at all. Let alone if I wanted to setup a server accessible from outside the home.


Yep thanks for understanding the underpowered isp consumer routers

openwrt.ebilan.co.uk/vie…138

That's an install guide for Windows

openwrt.ebilan.co.uk/vie…266

In-depth guide about the configuration and issues of OpenWRT on home hub
LordMetro24/05/2020 07:13

Yep thanks for understanding the underpowered isp consumer routers Yep thanks for understanding the underpowered isp consumer routers https://openwrt.ebilan.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=138That's an install guide for Windowshttps://openwrt.ebilan.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=266In-depth guide about the configuration and issues of OpenWRT on home hub


Wow! Thank you for taking the time to post that. I'm sure it will be useful for others too. Good karma on you Sir.
I just got mine few days ago.. for some reason, it asked my to 'register' the player and put my credit card details in. The way around it is to create the roku account first, and then just add the player.
Hi there, a question. I am looking for a stick which works as a receiver ( regular tv or free view) currently I have a 50" screen with a fire stick for Netflix and additional Freeview box for a regular live programs, looking for a stick which do both. Thanks for you help.
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