ROYAL LONDON FIXIE BIKE DAY GLO YELLOW OR BLUE, £99.99 SPORTS HQ VIA TESCO FREE C&C
213°Expired

ROYAL LONDON FIXIE BIKE DAY GLO YELLOW OR BLUE, £99.99 SPORTS HQ VIA TESCO FREE C&C

53
Found 6th JanMade hot 6th Jan
Fixies or fixed gear bikes are great urban bikes that are extremely popular with biking aficionados who feel they give a pure, enjoyable and exciting cycling experience.

With no freewheel, your legs control the pace - there's no coasting - to brake, you use your legs to slow the pedals. The stripped down, minimalist design reduces weight and increases your connection to the road - it's like nothing else on two wheels.

Often, fixies come without brakes, but to ensure safety and compliance with the laws of the land, Royal London have attached brakes at both the front and rear wheels.

There's also a flip-flop rear hub - this allows you to ride it as a pure fixed gear bike, or convert to a single speed.

Features

Study 22" steel frame
Flip-flop rear hub: ride on fixed gear or single-speed
16T Rear hub
700c steel fork
Steel handlebar
700c rims
Wanda 700c x 25c Tires
Front and Rear V breaks
Height adjustable seat
Plastic pedals
Weight: 14kgs

53 Comments

Original Poster

Also available in white but can not get links to work, if you go on tesco direct and search "royal london fixie" should return 4 results.

Think the yellow one looks great. Added Heat

Rode a fixie once and never again. Absolutely terrifying if your pedals unclip going down a hill and your frantically trying to get your feet back on. Probably something you'd get used to but scary all the same.

Heat

Eyesore.

it's not no gears and if they had their way it would have no brakes?

what's the world coming too? that's like selling a car with no engine, no gearbox and no brakes as a 'stripped back minimalist design"

who on earth would buy one of these for a hundred bones?

id rather buy a bike with all the parts a bike should have for the same kind of money

GeordieRob

it's not no gears and if they had their way it would have no … it's not no gears and if they had their way it would have no brakes?what's the world coming too? that's like selling a car with no engine, no gearbox and no brakes as a 'stripped back minimalist design" who on earth would buy one of these for a hundred bones? id rather buy a bike with all the parts a bike should have for the same kind of money



​Fixie's are seen by many as a purist way of riding a bike. You are directly connected to the road because of the lack of free wheel.
They can also improve pedalling due to the lack of freewheel and can build leg strength due to the lack of gears.
They are minimalist, low maintenance and unlikely to be stolen (compared to geared bikes).

Nonetheless, they are quite scary for most. The fact that you cannot stop pedalling, especially when cornering (!) is daunting for those who are new to them. The lack of gears can make riding in hilly areas difficult. They aren't really designed as a bike to be ridden for long periods of time - more as city bikes (at least these days).

For the money, you would buy a pretty more geared bikes to be quite honest. Look at it this way - you'd be paying for a cheaper frame with terrible components!

MAdam98

​Fixie's are seen by many as a purist way of riding a bike. You are d … ​Fixie's are seen by many as a purist way of riding a bike. You are directly connected to the road because of the lack of free wheel.They can also improve pedalling due to the lack of freewheel and can build leg strength due to the lack of gears.They are minimalist, low maintenance and unlikely to be stolen (compared to geared bikes).Nonetheless, they are quite scary for most. The fact that you cannot stop pedalling, especially when cornering (!) is daunting for those who are new to them. The lack of gears can make riding in hilly areas difficult. They aren't really designed as a bike to be ridden for long periods of time - more as city bikes (at least these days).For the money, you would buy a pretty more geared bikes to be quite honest. Look at it this way - you'd be paying for a cheaper frame with terrible components!



A better way to build leg strength would be to keep the hundred quid and just go for a walk instead of buying one of this poorly thought out 'bikes'.

I've never even heard of them before today, and if it was April the 1st I'd be convinced this was an April Fool posting.

No offence intended to the OP at all, I just think it's a crazy idea. That is unless they are the CEO of Fixies, or came up with the idea of 'let's create a bike missing loads of bits, paint it with some luminous paint and see who'll buy them"

Thanks, but "I'm out"


Pure?? Load of rubbish. Just more of a pain to ride, If you only want one gear get a single speed so you can freewheel. If you want pure build a wooden bike with no pedals!

Im out too! If they have left out a 300g gearset in order to save weight why did they use a steel frame instead of an alloy one which would be several kgs lighter!

Pretty sure this have a reversible back wheel with a freewheel on the other side so you don't have to ride "fixie" you can have a single speed freewheel too.

There is something oddly refreshing about these bikes. Funky looks too!


edit: Yup it's in the OP, I didn't see it (just like everyone else apparently)

There's also a flip-flop rear hub - this allows you to ride it as a pure … There's also a flip-flop rear hub - this allows you to ride it as a pure fixed gear bike, or convert to a single speed.


Edited by: "colourpie" 6th Jan

The favourite of hipsters nowadays.

Same price with free delivery or pickup at Argos if you buy on eBay (from the same seller)

ebay.co.uk/itm…829

I grew up with fixed wheel bikes in the sixties so despite what some people in this thread may think they're hardly new
( therefore hipster? ), they obviously weren't when I was growing up with them either.

I haven't voted either way because I don't know if they're good for the money or otherwise, I have to be honest, I came to see if any bike snobs had come on to dismiss them as BSOs, I miss those threads, they were great, I'd say the leasing threads are the nearest equivalent nowadays.

First I heard of Fixies was after watching the movie Premium Rush. Looked so cool 8)Thought I'd look into it but then realised it definitely wasn't for me.

Oh and to say it's stripped back that should help withweight saving and then quote 14kg

Okay i'll go first BSO. Im not a bike snob and no disrespect meant to the poster as ive never posted a deal myself.

Firstly the picture doesn't match the description, none of the bikes shown in the photos have V brakes they have very cheap looking side pull calipers combined with painted rim surfaces which could provide a nasty surprise the first time you ride in the wet. Other points I note the saddle is very shiny, schrader valves on 700c wheels, cheap pressed steel chainset, weird inclusion of a chain guard considering its minimalist pure cycling experience and finally 14kg total weight (thats 30 lbs and I have a 15 year old full sus that weights less than that).

I have no issues with cheap bikes, but I generally dont believe that you can get anything new for under £200 nowadays thats worth riding. This bike will have a very short life expectancy before components need replacing or it will require constant fetling to keep it roadworthy and efficent. If you have less than try second hand.

That said you can occasionally get a cheap carrera on offer from Halfords for under £200, ladies hybrid below (no mens left) £170 - which will outlast the posted one many times over.

halfords.com/cyc…ike
Edited by: "algloster" 6th Jan

GeordieRob

A better way to build leg strength would be to keep the hundred quid and … A better way to build leg strength would be to keep the hundred quid and just go for a walk instead of buying one of this poorly thought out 'bikes'.I've never even heard of them before today, and if it was April the 1st I'd be convinced this was an April Fool posting.No offence intended to the OP at all, I just think it's a crazy idea. That is unless they are the CEO of Fixies, or came up with the idea of 'let's create a bike missing loads of bits, paint it with some luminous paint and see who'll buy them"Thanks, but "I'm out"


You obviously have no idea what your rabbling on about.
Fixed wheel bikes have been about for years and some cost into the thousands.

Did you watch the velodrome at the olympics? Fixed wheel.

A lot of club cyclists use them during the winter for training as you can get a better workout over a shorter distance.

Its not some fad that someones pulled out a hat.

Superman on a fixie

14kg! for a fixie!

Gordinho

I grew up with fixed wheel bikes in the sixties so despite what some … I grew up with fixed wheel bikes in the sixties so despite what some people in this thread may think they're hardly new ( therefore hipster? ), they obviously weren't when I was growing up with them either. I haven't voted either way because I don't know if they're good for the money or otherwise, I have to be honest, I came to see if any bike snobs had come on to dismiss them as BSOs, I miss those threads, they were great, I'd say the leasing threads are the nearest equivalent nowadays.



Yup, me and my mates were turning our standard bikes into fixies and ss back the early 70's when we were kids. We'd change the bars and do all manner of mods to our bikes.
Nowadays i see people on here that cant even assemble a bike when its ordered online and talk about which shop to take it to !

Guy Martin seems to get on ok with a ss...... Rode across a desert in China with one and did it in record time.

Banned

Guy Martin is surely the world's most irritating person? Like Karl Pilkington only actually thick instead of pretending to be lol

BrianSewell

Guy Martin is surely the world's most irritating person? Like Karl … Guy Martin is surely the world's most irritating person? Like Karl Pilkington only actually thick instead of pretending to be lol


Yeah has definately got a screw loose.

He does seem quite genuine though, what you see is what you get.

Definately done alright for himself so respect there.
Edited by: "callum84" 7th Jan

algloster

Okay i'll go first BSO.



I'm a little disappointed, you weren't in the least little bit obnoxious and you made some fair points. Other than that you used the abbreviation BSO so I'm putting you straight on ignore.

Edited by: "Gordinho" 7th Jan

Riding a fixed gear is ace; I've commuted like that for years. For one, you'll start to realise how little you need gears. Uphills are a challenge, downhills are your "spins". And contrary to what you would think, comparing my strava times over various 12 / 15 mile commutes, I'm fastest on uphills on the fixed - it's the downhill and flat I'm limited despite running a long-ish gear (15/46). On my current 12mile, I'm consistently 5 mins slower on the fixed.

Give it a go! It doesn't take long to get used to it and is definitely a great feeling whizzing along clipped in and spinning all the time (a very clean feeling, less losses)

completely agree I switched from geared to ss then fixie, as stated it does take a little while to get used to but it's worth it. I wouldn't go back now.

if you have any interest at all I recommend giving it a blast.

GeordieRob

A better way to build leg strength would be to keep the hundred quid and … A better way to build leg strength would be to keep the hundred quid and just go for a walk instead of buying one of this poorly thought out 'bikes'.I've never even heard of them before today, and if it was April the 1st I'd be convinced this was an April Fool posting.No offence intended to the OP at all, I just think it's a crazy idea. That is unless they are the CEO of Fixies, or came up with the idea of 'let's create a bike missing loads of bits, paint it with some luminous paint and see who'll buy them"Thanks, but "I'm out"



clearly you know very little about cycling and bikes if you have never heard of fixed gear bikes and think that you could get a decent geared bike for £100 .

As someone who does spend a lot of time cycling and does know about bikes in a city fixies are perfectly adequete if not sometimes preferable because of the simplicity and lack of excess weight . if i ride my geared hybrid to work I rarely if ever use more than 2 gears and can easilly make the same journey on a fixie with the same level of effort mainly due to how light it is . This even has a flip flop hub so if you are not used to riding a fixed gear you can still freewheel . Although 10 minutes on a spinning bike in a gym should be enough to get you used to using legs to slow down etc .

futura

Im out too! If they have left out a 300g gearset in order to save weight … Im out too! If they have left out a 300g gearset in order to save weight why did they use a steel frame instead of an alloy one which would be several kgs lighter!



Cos steel is real!

robertoegg

Riding a fixed gear is ace; I've commuted like that for years. For one, … Riding a fixed gear is ace; I've commuted like that for years. For one, you'll start to realise how little you need gears. Uphills are a challenge, downhills are your "spins". And contrary to what you would think, comparing my strava times over various 12 / 15 mile commutes, I'm fastest on uphills on the fixed - it's the downhill and flat I'm limited despite running a long-ish gear (15/46). On my current 12mile, I'm consistently 5 mins slower on the fixed.Give it a go! It doesn't take long to get used to it and is definitely a great feeling whizzing along clipped in and spinning all the time (a very clean feeling, less losses)



​Disagree with the gears bit... Trying riding in the Lancs country side without gears... 22℅

muz379

clearly you know very little about cycling and bikes if you have never … clearly you know very little about cycling and bikes if you have never heard of fixed gear bikes and think that you could get a decent geared bike for £100 . As someone who does spend a lot of time cycling and does know about bikes in a city fixies are perfectly adequete if not sometimes preferable because of the simplicity and lack of excess weight . if i ride my geared hybrid to work I rarely if ever use more than 2 gears and can easilly make the same journey on a fixie with the same level of effort mainly due to how light it is . This even has a flip flop hub so if you are not used to riding a fixed gear you can still freewheel . Although 10 minutes on a spinning bike in a gym should be enough to get you used to using legs to slow down etc .



​Nah.

Superman isn't real?

Hat fad.

Fixies have no place on public roads. They should be kept on a track.

muz379

clearly you know very little about cycling and bikes if you have never … clearly you know very little about cycling and bikes if you have never heard of fixed gear bikes and think that you could get a decent geared bike for £100 . As someone who does spend a lot of time cycling and does know about bikes in a city fixies are perfectly adequete if not sometimes preferable because of the simplicity and lack of excess weight . if i ride my geared hybrid to work I rarely if ever use more than 2 gears and can easilly make the same journey on a fixie with the same level of effort mainly due to how light it is . This even has a flip flop hub so if you are not used to riding a fixed gear you can still freewheel . Although 10 minutes on a spinning bike in a gym should be enough to get you used to using legs to slow down etc .



No bike is preferable because of its lack of excess weight if it means it poses safety risks to its user and others. I'd never say that the omission of brakes, etc, is preferable unless riding on a track or on a closed private road, for example.

Using legs to stop isn't preferable at all. You can't slow as quickly (and can lose control in doing so) if you're traveling at speed and that can have serious consequences, especially if you're inexperienced on a fixie. If you have an accident in central London, god help you!

If a flip-flop hub is used, technically you should ensure that a rear brake is fitted, and that is why Royal London have included one on this bike. However, I'd argue that this makes the case for not bothering to ride this bike.

One reason not to ride a fixie is that they seem to turn ordinary riders into selfish prats.

Clipping in with moving pedals is a challenge, so why stop at red lights and pedestrian crossings? Brakes don't look right, so skidding to an eventual halt in three times the distance and with no directional control is the way to go.

All the supposed advantages of a fixie apply to SS bikes, too, along with free-wheeling down-hill and no pedal strike. Each to their own, but for almost all riders and riding a fixie is the worst choice.

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/penny-farthing-crash.jpg

the__cat

No bike is preferable because of its lack of excess weight if it means it … No bike is preferable because of its lack of excess weight if it means it poses safety risks to its user and others. I'd never say that the omission of brakes, etc, is preferable unless riding on a track or on a closed private road, for example.Using legs to stop isn't preferable at all. You can't slow as quickly (and can lose control in doing so) if you're traveling at speed and that can have serious consequences, especially if you're inexperienced on a fixie. If you have an accident in central London, god help you!If a flip-flop hub is used, technically you should ensure that a rear brake is fitted, and that is why Royal London have included one on this bike. However, I'd argue that this makes the case for not bothering to ride this bike.



I never said that a bike would be preferable without brakes . clearly as this bike includes both front and rear brakes your comments are irrelevant .

callum84

Did you watch the velodrome at the olympics? Fixed wheel..Superman on a … Did you watch the velodrome at the olympics? Fixed wheel..Superman on a fixie


I saw that, you need a push to get going and take an age to get up to speed and that is without wind in your face.

muz379

I never said that a bike would be preferable without brakes . clearly as … I never said that a bike would be preferable without brakes . clearly as this bike includes both front and rear brakes your comments are irrelevant .



I never said that you said a bike without brakes is preferable. What I did say is that a fixie wouldn't be preferable because of its lack of excess weight if it poses safety risks to its user and to others. A fixie is often brakeless and that poses a risk, so no, my comments aren't irrelevant. You simply didn't understand what I said. I was talking about true fixies. This bike isn't a true fixie, so in fact your comments are irrelevant.

the__cat

I never said that you said a bike without brakes is preferable. What I … I never said that you said a bike without brakes is preferable. What I did say is that a fixie wouldn't be preferable because of its lack of excess weight if it poses safety risks to its user and to others. A fixie is often brakeless and that poses a risk, so no, my comments aren't irrelevant. You simply didn't understand what I said. I was talking about true fixies. This bike isn't a true fixie, so in fact your comments are irrelevant.



And what exactly qualifies you to decide what is and what is not a true fixie ?

Given that the main element that defines a bike as a fixie is having a fixed gear to propel it this has that thus in my mind this is a fixie .

Buy a fixed gear bike from any reputable retailer and it will have front and rear brakes in order to comply with the law so what basis you have for the "a fixie is often brakeless" comment is somewhat questionable . I've very rarely seen people riding fixies without brakes and I live in a big city with a growing hipster community , i've actually seen as many people riding normal bikes with one or both of their brakes unhooked because they have untrue wheels and do not have the knowledge to solve the problem of rubbing brakes . The bottom of shoes used to stop you would certainly be much less effective than brakes .

I completely agree if a bike manufacturer has elected to exclude brakes from a bike in order to save weight then that would be unsafe and certainly not preferable to any bike with fully operational brakes .

muz379

And what exactly qualifies you to decide what is and what is not a true … And what exactly qualifies you to decide what is and what is not a true fixie ? Given that the main element that defines a bike as a fixie is having a fixed gear to propel it this has that thus in my mind this is a fixie . Buy a fixed gear bike from any reputable retailer and it will have front and rear brakes in order to comply with the law so what basis you have for the "a fixie is often brakeless" comment is somewhat questionable . I've very rarely seen people riding fixies without brakes and I live in a big city with a growing hipster community , i've actually seen as many people riding normal bikes with one or both of their brakes unhooked because they have untrue wheels and do not have the knowledge to solve the problem of rubbing brakes . The bottom of shoes used to stop you would certainly be much less effective than brakes . I completely agree if a bike manufacturer has elected to exclude brakes from a bike in order to save weight then that would be unsafe and certainly not preferable to any bike with fully operational brakes .



I don't think you need to be qualified to deduce that a fixie has no freewheeling mechanism. It's a fixed-cog that gives it its name. If the cog that attaches to the rear wheel has no mechanism for rotating independently of the wheel to which it is attached, it's a fixie. If the cog can rotate it's not fixed and therefore not a fixie.

As for braking requirements, the law states that any free-wheeling mechanism must be accompanied by a dedicated braking system. If a truly fixed-wheel is apparent on the bicycle it can be considered to have its own braking mechanism simply by virtue of the fixed cog attached to the fixed cog at the pedals via the chain. If, however, a flip-flop is installed that wheel must then have its own dedicated braking system which is independent of any other. On that note, the retailer doesn't have any obligation to sell a bicycle with any brakes whatsoever; it is up to the consumer to ensure that it is roadworthy. If a bicycle is sold with fitted brakes, however, they must be installed in the correct configuration before the consumer takes it away.

I reiterate therefore that a brake does not need to be installed on the rear wheel where a completely-fixed cog is installed, nor does the retailer have to install one.

As for the brakeless fixie comment, that's completely true. I've seen plenty of people down in London, and elsewhere, with no brakes on their bikes. When 'hipsters', as you put it, starting using fixies they were often brakeless, much like they were in countries such as Holland, for example. Holland follows EU rules. Yes, the law in the UK may say that a brake is required on any free-wheel, but EU legislation only states that an efficient brake must present. A fixie is deemed to be an efficient brake as long as it isn't a flip-flop, for example, so that means no front brake is required in Holland and therefore no hand-operated brakes are installed. The law ultimately applies in the country that you're cycling in though as long as it at least adheres to EU legislation, so UK law trumps in this case, and at least a front brake must be installed.
Edited by: "the__cat" 9th Jan

the__cat

I don't think you need to be qualified to deduce that a fixie has no … I don't think you need to be qualified to deduce that a fixie has no freewheeling mechanism. It's a fixed-cog that gives it its name. If the cog that attaches to the rear wheel has no mechanism for rotating independently of the wheel to which it is attached, it's a fixie. If the cog can rotate it's not fixed and therefore not a fixie.As for braking requirements, the law states that any free-wheeling mechanism must be accompanied by a dedicated braking system. If a truly fixed-wheel is apparent on the bicycle it can be considered to have its own braking mechanism simply by virtue of the fixed cog attached to the fixed cog at the pedals via the chain. If, however, a flip-flop is installed that wheel must then have its own dedicated braking system which is independent of any other. On that note, the retailer doesn't have any obligation to sell a bicycle with any brakes whatsoever; it is up to the consumer to ensure that it is roadworthy. If a bicycle is sold with fitted brakes, however, they must be installed in the correct configuration before the consumer takes it away.I reiterate therefore that a brake does not need to be installed on the rear wheel where a completely-fixed cog is installed, nor does the retailer have to install one.As for the brakeless fixie comment, that's completely true. I've seen plenty of people down in London, and elsewhere, with no brakes on their bikes. When 'hipsters', as you put it, starting using fixies they were often brakeless, much like they were in countries such as Holland, for example. Holland follows EU rules. Yes, the law in the UK may say that a brake is required on any free-wheel, but EU legislation only states that an efficient brake must present. A fixie is deemed to be an efficient brake as long as it isn't a flip-flop, for example, so that means no front brake is required in Holland and therefore no hand-operated brakes are installed. The law ultimately applies in the country that you're cycling in though as long as it at least adheres to EU legislation, so UK law trumps in this case, and at least a front brake must be installed.



So wait essentially we agree that because this has the option of a fixed rear cog it could be considered a fixie .

we also agree that because it has a flip flop hub the inclusion of front and rear brakes is necessary to comply with the UK law on bicycles to be used on the roads .

it seems we also agree that there are some riders out there who choose to ride un roadworthy bicycles by removing the front brake and just using the fixed cog to slow down and stop . I however fail to see how this is anything to do with manufacturers or retailers of these bikes if people chose to remove components . Any reputable bicycle retailer just like a reputable car retailer would provide you with a road legal vehicle ,should you then choose not to maintain or to modify the vehicle so that it is not road worthy this is your own responsibility .

as I said I do not see the relevance of your comments saying that a fixie without brakes would not be preferable to say a hybrid with brakes . because nobody here is advocating the use or sale of such bike . it is unfortunate that some do decide to ride bikes configured in this was yes but it is not relevant to this bike or any comments in this thread .
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