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Rustic Oak Effect Laminate £12.76 @ Focus
Rustic Oak Effect Laminate £12.76 @ Focus

Rustic Oak Effect Laminate £12.76 @ Focus

Buy forBuy forBuy for£12.76
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Rustic Oak Effect Laminate
50% off!
Pack Coverage: 2.13m2
6mm board thickness
Easy to install. Click-fit system
No glue required
Scratch and stain resistant
10 year domestic guarantee
Suitable for use in: Kitchens Living Areas Hallways & Landings Conservatories

WAS £25.52 NOW £12.76
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16 Comments

Bought some of this stuff for my 2nd 2 bedrooms.

It looks alright down, but its not the best quality.

In particular, your floor has to be virtually PERFECTLY level - you can feel every lump and bump through it as its very thin, and a b****r to fit.

I also got it for a little bit cheaper per sqm.

Not voted from me.

Original Poster

Is it recommended for bedrooms??

I was thinking to use this in my kitchen, which as per the image they supply, I'd expect it to look nice

A bedroom is a "living area" and is classed as much lower use than the areas listed - so yes.

Personally, theres no way I would use 6mm thick laminate in my kitchen or anywhere else with likely splashes - itll warp quicker than you can say "dropped glass".

I put 15mm thick in my kitchen, with aqua loc to prevent any kind of serious water ingress. Even then, I kinda regret it - tiled or vinyl floors I think in the kitchen in future for me!

Original Poster

Thanks for the tip and advice :thumbsup:

I think I need a man about the house so I stop buying tat lol :whistling:

Thats alright!

Basically, the thicker the better (but also the more expensive).

For areas with water, look for one with a locking feature, as that will prevent (most) water getting in.

Otherwise, the boards will swell at the joints and just pop out from each other.

MrShed;8138884

I kinda regret it - tiled or vinyl floors I think in the kitchen in … I kinda regret it - tiled or vinyl floors I think in the kitchen in future for me!



Agree with you - another point of note is tiles are much more practical if you are considering installing underfloor heating. Wood absorbs the heat whereas tile/stone radiates :thumbsup:

MrShed;8138765

Bought some of this stuff for my 2nd 2 bedrooms.It looks alright down, … Bought some of this stuff for my 2nd 2 bedrooms.It looks alright down, but its not the best quality.In particular, your floor has to be virtually PERFECTLY level - you can feel every lump and bump through it as its very thin, and a b****r to fit.I also got it for a little bit cheaper per sqm.Not voted from me.



sounds as if you have layed it wrong and not used the boards that is ment to go under the wooden flooring, the same floor is only £10.49 in b&q and i have layed it in 4 bedrooms and it has gone down perfect

tronic;8139672

sounds as if you have layed it wrong and not used the boards that is … sounds as if you have layed it wrong and not used the boards that is ment to go under the wooden flooring, the same floor is only £10.49 in b&q and i have layed it in 4 bedrooms and it has gone down perfect



Not really.

There are no boards that are "meant" to go under the wooden flooring.

You can stick some 6mm ply under if you want to flatten the surface out - but then you are simply adding to the cost.

Moreover it isnt the "right" way of doing it, simply a way of working around the problem of an uneven floor. The other way is to buy thicker laminate, which is all you are effectively doing by sticking ply underneath....

You also shouldnt put the boards on a concrete slab floor, as it will soak up any moisture if it is present (which it is in many/most cases).

The boards certainly wouldnt help with regards water ingress though!

MrShed;8139857

Not really.There are no boards that are "meant" to go under the wooden … Not really.There are no boards that are "meant" to go under the wooden flooring.You can stick some 6mm ply under if you want to flatten the surface out - but then you are simply adding to the cost.Moreover it isnt the "right" way of doing it, simply a way of working around the problem of an uneven floor. The other way is to buy thicker laminate, which is all you are effectively doing by sticking ply underneath....You also shouldnt put the boards on a concrete slab floor, as it will soak up any moisture if it is present (which it is in many/most cases).The boards certainly wouldnt help with regards water ingress though!



you have proven the point you have not got a clue how to lay wooden flooring so why try and put a deal down as from what you have said there is nothing wrong with the flooring you have got its the way you have layed it

using these underlay boards means you will get the most out of my flooring. use these over existing floorboards and the underlay board allows for a level surface over uneven, rough floorboards."

diy.com/diy…lse

I havent proven the point.

Please on that basis, provide me with something definitive that states "you should put boards under wooden flooring".

Tronic, your last minute edit just makes you look idiotic.

I absolutely just said that you can use the boards to level out the floor.

Your post doesnt state that you should always use boards, only to level out the difference in height - which I had already agreed with.

I also said that thicker laminate would do the job as well.

So I havent proven your point at all, I've merely specified that (like I said in my initial post) if the floor is not very level, you will feel the difference in levels.

You are effectively arguing with me to agree with me!!!

I never put the deal down, I made a "heads up" that your floor needs to be level, as well as stating that it has been cheaper in the past.

Troll.

[QUOTE=MrShed;8140075]Tronic, your last minute edit just makes you look idiotic.

I absolutely just said that you can use the boards to level out the floor.

Your post doesnt state that you should always use boards, only to level out the difference in height - which I had already agreed with.

I also said that thicker laminate would do the job as well.

So I havent proven your point at all, I've merely specified that (like I said in my initial post) if the floor is not very level, you will feel the difference in levels.

You are effectively arguing with me to agree with me!!!

I never put the deal down, I made a "heads up" that your floor needs to be level, as well as stating that it has been cheaper in the past.

Troll.[/QUOTE

as you stated in your earlyer post
There are no boards that are "meant" to go under the wooden flooring.

i edit my link to put a link to the boards, now you have changed your mind and now you are saying in the this post (I absolutely just said that you can use the boards to level out the floor.)
what are you a gold fish, ill say no more on this and let other people read your post as they will laugh at you like i am doing thanks for making me laugh as much today :whistling:

fine - clearly you have misread my post.

I think it is pretty obvious that I meant that there are no boards that you must put under wooden flooring - merely that you can. Hence the "meant" part in quotes.

You are an idiot, shooting down someone with a genuine attempt to help. Even if my posts have perhaps not been 100% clear, I think most people will have read it as "ensure your floor is level". Simple as.

For your information, dont selectively quote me - as you can clearly see from the thread, I DID say that you can use boards to level out the floor, BEFORE your post.

Anyway, I dont intend to argue with some internet jerk, with some high and mighty attitude, about how to lay a bloody floor, nor about the exact semantics and syntax of individual language in posts. Its ironic that reading back over your post history the vast majority is simply you trolling - what a bloody surprise.

My advice still stands - the laminate is thin, so make sure the floor is level. The quality of this stuff isnt the best. I wouldnt use such thin laminate in anywhere with water.

Goodbye.

i am confused as i was told waterproof laminate can take kitchen spills -- should this be bad advice b and q say there is a warranty - it sounds like this may not be advised from the posts

Where does this say it is waterproof laminate?

Generally, it's a good idea to use a waterproof/aqua type in a kitchen area in case of spills, but these can be much more expensive, so perhaps just as important, as with all floating floors, is making sure you leave a proper expansion gap around the edges, (don't go right to the edge of a wall/skirting), this will help compensate for minor spills which will cause some swelling, although the boards will naturally move anyway.The ideal way for neat finish is to of course remove the existing skirting, lay the floor, and then re-attach/fit new skirting.Failing that, you can just use the special trims which you can attach to your skirting to cover the gap.Also, refrain from sealing around the edges, this will again prevent the floor from being able to expand, which can cause bubbling in the centre of the floor, which is very hard to put right, trust me, I've seen it happen.
As regards uneven floors, don't just lay this over an existing floor, use the proper insulation underlay.When I used to lay floors for customers, I always recommended insulation boards (about £20 for 20), not the thin foam rolls (as Focus is suggesting), these provide a good cushioned base, which will lose some of the existing floors inperfections (if the floors are really bad then you can use 2 layers, levelling compound or hardboard/plywood over as already mentioned, depending on existing floor type), but also help make for a quieter and warmer laminated floor.Finally, and pretty obvious, when laying keep the area as clean as possible as you work, as anything getting into the grooves of the boards, will prevent them 'locking' together as neatly as they should.

I've fitted a lot of laminate, and real wood floors over the years, so I hope at least some of this is useful!
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