Unfortunately, this deal is no longer valid
Safety RCD Adaptor - model number ARCDKG £3 @ Homebase
1039° Expired

Safety RCD Adaptor - model number ARCDKG £3 @ Homebase

£3£8.9967%Homebase Deals
40
Posted 11th Jul

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Life saving product - RCD adaptor reduced to £3 at Homebase, selling for £9+ elsewhere including Screwfix and Amazon. Loads of stock available at time of posting, free c+c


3260860-V7NNl.jpg




Safety RCD adaptor for added protection against the risk of electric shock. It instantly cuts the power in the event of an earth connection leakage. It is non-latching, therefore power needs to be reset at each use and it is ideal for home appliance spike protection.

  • Home appliance spike protection
  • Power-cut safety feature
  • Maximum load 3120 watts
  • RCD circuit breaker 240 volt appliance
  • Conforms to BS7071

3260860.jpg
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
At this price it would be stupid not to buy 10 and daisychain them together so that you are super-protected
Mr_Gus11/07/2019 09:31

Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for …Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for instance, because the rcd is nearer you than the one in the house further down the chain of metres & metres of electric cable running round your house not necessarily in the shortest direction & run.Also allows you to check that the unit is working everytime you use it rather rather than guesswork.Logic.



30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the speed of light 299 792 458 m / s (and that electricity through copper wire travels at about 95% speed of light, so 284 802 835 m/s) is 0.000000105... Seconds, so 105 nanoseconds

So no that won't make a difference or save a life any better than the panel rcd

These are only useful in isolating appliances from the rest of the circuit and not cutting out power to the entire circuit. Or if you just want to be doubly careful in case panel rcd wasn't installed properly or has failed (never a bad thing to be cautious)
Quick disclaimer, please don't mess around in your consumer unit (CU), have a look by all means but don't start poking around inside or taking the covers off and no, I'm not a spark.

I've never seen the main breaker switch with RCD protection, it's generally a dual pole (both live and neutral) switch rated at 100amp, there may be some with RCD protection but they are definitely not the norm.

In 2015 the '17th edition' regs come into play which in short means that if you've have a re-wire/consumer unit replaced since then you likely have RCD protection.... don't take that as gospel though, CHECK! Most will have 30mA leakage.

A pic to show you what they look like - ultimatehandyman.co.uk/spl…jpg

1 is the main switch, as mentioned, that is usually just a switch for the incoming into your board from the meter. (You'll now sometimes find another isolator outside of the CU as well as this, this is so a spark can shut down the power to the CU to switch the board) In short ALL power goes through that switch, switch that off and you'll get nothing until its back on, its there to isolate the rest of the board (but the incoming is still live up to that switch!)

3 is an RCD, (note the yellow push button to test it and it has RCD written on it), that protects all of the MCB's, which are the smaller switches to the left on the right side of the board (take note of the gap (marked 2), that 'splits' the board to left and right sides). Each of those will be circuit such as downstairs lights, upstairs lights (or both up and down), up/down sockets (or both) and so on. If there is a fault on any of the MCB's on the right, the main RCD for the right side of the board should trip and kills the power to all of that side.

The left side (the main switch 1 and the 5 MCB's) has no RCD protection on that board pictured. Why do that?

Because originally someone had the idea to keep things like lights separate (or smoke alarms) and always on even if your RCD tripped killing all your sockets. So generally you would have lights on the left, smoke alarms, maybe even your immersion heater. On the right you'd have sockets, cooker etc.

Generally (with new boards) you'll now have an RCD on both sides of the board with multiple MCBs each side and your house will be split into up and down...

Left = upstairs sockets, upstairs lights, shower, etc
Right = downstairs sockets, downstairs lights, cooker etc

Why? So you still have protection everywhere but if your kettle blows up your upstairs sockets etc (the left side) stay on.
Or at 4am you switch the light on in the bathroom and it blows tripping the RCD, you can still go downstairs and find a bulb in the light! (Or just go back to bed and hope it works in the morning)

That means next to 1 you'd have something else that looks like the RCD (labelled 2), then the MCB's for the left side. You still have a main switch, but with 2 sections and 2 RCD's protecting their own sections.

You should use one of these if you don't have RCD protection on your sockets, adding one if you RCD protection on your board wont help much as your CU RCD will likely trip before/when this does, but adding one if you don't already have protection could potentially save your life.
Edited by: "Pebblo" 11th Jul
Gormond11/07/2019 08:46

In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are …In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are more sensitive than the RCD in the consumer unit.



Bogami11/07/2019 09:09

I have two different makes of this. My home RCD would trip before these …I have two different makes of this. My home RCD would trip before these unfortunately. I think you need to look at the leakage current specs of your home RCD before you buy these.



Mr_Gus11/07/2019 09:31

Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for …Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for instance, because the rcd is nearer you than the one in the house further down the chain of metres & metres of electric cable running round your house not necessarily in the shortest direction & run.Also allows you to check that the unit is working everytime you use it rather rather than guesswork.Logic.



robodan91811/07/2019 09:55

30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the …30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the speed of light 299 792 458 m / s (and that electricity through copper wire travels at about 95% speed of light, so 284 802 835 m/s) is 0.000000105... Seconds, so 105 nanoseconds So no that won't make a difference or save a life any better than the panel rcdThese are only useful in isolating appliances from the rest of the circuit and not cutting out power to the entire circuit. Or if you just want to be doubly careful in case panel rcd wasn't installed properly or has failed (never a bad thing to be cautious)



Sharpharp11/07/2019 10:47

None whatsoever, in fact these RCDs are a pain as you have to press the …None whatsoever, in fact these RCDs are a pain as you have to press the set button each time it's switched on, which is a chew on when switching on outside imported xmas lights. Your regular RCD will do the same job but handle it better


You need to check your installation carefully

The breaker in a typical domestic consumer unit (fuse box / panel etc) is usually an MCB (mechanical or mini circuit breaker), NOT an RCD, and there's a big difference.

Say an MCB is rated at 10a for example. It will trip if the current goes above that level and if there is a short circuit. It's essentially there to prevent overloading and the damage it causes such as fires. It doesn't protect you from an electric shock, if you happened to get one from something on that circuit, it would probably trip (not definitely), but you've had the shock and at 10a. Anything over about 0.05a will possibly kill you, of if not give you serious problems.

An RCD measures the current going out through the live and back in through neutral. If the returning current is less, it will trip. An RCD normally trips at a very low value - something like 30ma - it's specifically made to save lives.

There are some MCB variants that also have RCD capabilities (RCBO, ECLB) but they are usually only found in commercial properties. Domestically, some electricians will fit them for outdoor circuits such as sheds, garages etc.
40 Comments
Good price. Any advantage of this over letting your normal RCD take care things?
Heat added and ordered two , 70 in stock near me ,

Blessings OP take care , take lots of care
Mine lasted about 6 months then it stopped working
With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main RCD, would only trip the adapter?
boss91199911/07/2019 08:06

With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main …With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main RCD, would only trip the adapter?


I also wanted to know this - realised I have one of these in the Kitchen of a house I bought and was clueless as to what it is used for. Found this link that explains it well.

faithfulltools.com/p/F…er)
boss91199911/07/2019 08:06

With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main …With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main RCD, would only trip the adapter?


In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are more sensitive than the RCD in the consumer unit.
Thanks chanchi. Ordered
supasta11/07/2019 08:10

I also wanted to know this - realised I have one of these in the Kitchen …I also wanted to know this - realised I have one of these in the Kitchen of a house I bought and was clueless as to what it is used for. Found this link that explains it well.https://www.faithfulltools.com/p/FPPRCD/RCD-Adaptor-(Circuit-Breaker)


Thanks
Gormond11/07/2019 08:46

In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are …In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are more sensitive than the RCD in the consumer unit.


Thanks
boss91199911/07/2019 08:06

With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main …With this does it mean that an appliance that would normally trip the main RCD, would only trip the adapter?


I have two different makes of this. My home RCD would trip before these unfortunately. I think you need to look at the leakage current specs of your home RCD before you buy these.
donslibi11/07/2019 07:24

Good price. Any advantage of this over letting your normal RCD take care …Good price. Any advantage of this over letting your normal RCD take care things?


Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for instance, because the rcd is nearer you than the one in the house further down the chain of metres & metres of electric cable running round your house not necessarily in the shortest direction & run.
Also allows you to check that the unit is working everytime you use it rather rather than guesswork.

Logic.
At this price it would be stupid not to buy 10 and daisychain them together so that you are super-protected
I have one of these I use for the Garage and lawn mower etc.
Mr_Gus11/07/2019 09:31

Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for …Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for instance, because the rcd is nearer you than the one in the house further down the chain of metres & metres of electric cable running round your house not necessarily in the shortest direction & run.Also allows you to check that the unit is working everytime you use it rather rather than guesswork.Logic.



30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the speed of light 299 792 458 m / s (and that electricity through copper wire travels at about 95% speed of light, so 284 802 835 m/s) is 0.000000105... Seconds, so 105 nanoseconds

So no that won't make a difference or save a life any better than the panel rcd

These are only useful in isolating appliances from the rest of the circuit and not cutting out power to the entire circuit. Or if you just want to be doubly careful in case panel rcd wasn't installed properly or has failed (never a bad thing to be cautious)
robodan91811/07/2019 09:55

30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the …30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the speed of light 299 792 458 m / s (and that electricity through copper wire travels at about 95% speed of light, so 284 802 835 m/s) is 0.000000105... Seconds, so 105 nanoseconds So no that won't make a difference or save a life any better than the panel rcdThese are only useful in isolating appliances from the rest of the circuit and not cutting out power to the entire circuit. Or if you just want to be doubly careful in case panel rcd wasn't installed properly or has failed (never a bad thing to be cautious)


But the biggest hook is the presumption of safety that you spend out for, sorry multiple windows open & no time to edit, ..I had to go check my masterplug RCD unit was still working & pressed send erroneously (& forgot about it) ...as per someone else saying theirs gave up after 6 months , I had a problem with mine (I think) & was working out whether it was a socket problem in the house, the high-ish draw component (a garden shredder) or "owt".

Yes, you are right mathematically, many folks still have old units on older properties so that's another reason, or access to the main board..mine is tucked away in my larder so takes 5 minutes to access / 30 seconds if I throw stuff on the floor

so it can be very convenient compared to re-setting the house rcd ...correct.
donslibi11/07/2019 07:24

Good price. Any advantage of this over letting your normal RCD take care …Good price. Any advantage of this over letting your normal RCD take care things?



None whatsoever, in fact these RCDs are a pain as you have to press the set button each time it's switched on, which is a chew on when switching on outside imported xmas lights. Your regular RCD will do the same job but handle it better
Edited by: "Sharpharp" 11th Jul
Gormond11/07/2019 08:46

In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are …In my experience it does, i'm guessing the individual RCD adapters are more sensitive than the RCD in the consumer unit.



Bogami11/07/2019 09:09

I have two different makes of this. My home RCD would trip before these …I have two different makes of this. My home RCD would trip before these unfortunately. I think you need to look at the leakage current specs of your home RCD before you buy these.



Mr_Gus11/07/2019 09:31

Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for …Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for instance, because the rcd is nearer you than the one in the house further down the chain of metres & metres of electric cable running round your house not necessarily in the shortest direction & run.Also allows you to check that the unit is working everytime you use it rather rather than guesswork.Logic.



robodan91811/07/2019 09:55

30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the …30 meters difference between rcd on plug and rcd on panel, divided by the speed of light 299 792 458 m / s (and that electricity through copper wire travels at about 95% speed of light, so 284 802 835 m/s) is 0.000000105... Seconds, so 105 nanoseconds So no that won't make a difference or save a life any better than the panel rcdThese are only useful in isolating appliances from the rest of the circuit and not cutting out power to the entire circuit. Or if you just want to be doubly careful in case panel rcd wasn't installed properly or has failed (never a bad thing to be cautious)



Sharpharp11/07/2019 10:47

None whatsoever, in fact these RCDs are a pain as you have to press the …None whatsoever, in fact these RCDs are a pain as you have to press the set button each time it's switched on, which is a chew on when switching on outside imported xmas lights. Your regular RCD will do the same job but handle it better


You need to check your installation carefully

The breaker in a typical domestic consumer unit (fuse box / panel etc) is usually an MCB (mechanical or mini circuit breaker), NOT an RCD, and there's a big difference.

Say an MCB is rated at 10a for example. It will trip if the current goes above that level and if there is a short circuit. It's essentially there to prevent overloading and the damage it causes such as fires. It doesn't protect you from an electric shock, if you happened to get one from something on that circuit, it would probably trip (not definitely), but you've had the shock and at 10a. Anything over about 0.05a will possibly kill you, of if not give you serious problems.

An RCD measures the current going out through the live and back in through neutral. If the returning current is less, it will trip. An RCD normally trips at a very low value - something like 30ma - it's specifically made to save lives.

There are some MCB variants that also have RCD capabilities (RCBO, ECLB) but they are usually only found in commercial properties. Domestically, some electricians will fit them for outdoor circuits such as sheds, garages etc.
Begize11/07/2019 10:56

You need to check your installation carefullyThe breaker in a typical …You need to check your installation carefullyThe breaker in a typical domestic consumer unit (fuse box / panel etc) is usually an MCB (mechanical or mini circuit breaker), NOT an RCD, and there's a big difference.Say an MCB is rated at 10a for example. It will trip if the current goes above that level and if there is a short circuit. It's essentially there to prevent overloading and the damage it causes such as fires. It doesn't protect you from an electric shock, if you happened to get one from something on that circuit, it would probably trip (not definitely), but you've had the shock and at 10a. Anything over about 0.05a will possibly kill you, of if not give you serious problems.An RCD measures the current going out through the live and back in through neutral. If the returning current is less, it will trip. An RCD normally trips at a very low value - something like 30ma - it's specifically made to save lives.There are some MCB variants that also have RCD capabilities (RCBO, ECLB) but they are usually only found in commercial properties. Domestically, some electricians will fit them for outdoor circuits such as sheds, garages etc.


I had a full rewire and new consumer unit in 2017. My (limited) understanding is that the consumer unit contains an RCD? Obviously that's not going to be the case for old houses/installs
Just what I was looking for. Heat added.
Bossworld11/07/2019 11:01

I had a full rewire and new consumer unit in 2017. My (limited) …I had a full rewire and new consumer unit in 2017. My (limited) understanding is that the consumer unit contains an RCD? Obviously that's not going to be the case for old houses/installs



Not always, usually the main incoming switch will have some kind of RCD protection but it will normally be a lot higher current leak trip level than one of the plug in units like this. You don't always see the protection for individual circuits. If they have a little test button on, they are most likely RCD type devices.

I think the regulations changed fairly recently (2015??) to basically say RCD's should be fitted on a lot of circuits such as showers, garages etc, but not necessary all. They don't say it has to be in the form of a consumer unit breaker - for example using a socket with a built in RCD on a circuit with a normal MCB is OK.

Personally, for the sake of a few quid, I wouldn't risk it.

I should add, I'm basing my comments on what a couple of mates, one of whom is a qualified electrician and another who is a property manager have said to me in the past. In the electrical world, regulations change often, so it's always worth speaking to someone qualified.
Edited by: "Begize" 11th Jul
Begize11/07/2019 10:56

You need to check your installation carefullyThe breaker in a typical …You need to check your installation carefullyThe breaker in a typical domestic consumer unit (fuse box / panel etc) is usually an MCB (mechanical or mini circuit breaker), NOT an RCD, and there's a big difference.Say an MCB is rated at 10a for example. It will trip if the current goes above that level and if there is a short circuit. It's essentially there to prevent overloading and the damage it causes such as fires. It doesn't protect you from an electric shock, if you happened to get one from something on that circuit, it would probably trip (not definitely), but you've had the shock and at 10a. Anything over about 0.05a will possibly kill you, of if not give you serious problems.An RCD measures the current going out through the live and back in through neutral. If the returning current is less, it will trip. An RCD normally trips at a very low value - something like 30ma - it's specifically made to save lives.There are some MCB variants that also have RCD capabilities (RCBO, ECLB) but they are usually only found in commercial properties. Domestically, some electricians will fit them for outdoor circuits such as sheds, garages etc.


All new houses or newly rewired houses in the last 10-15 years will have at least one RCD and a couple of MCBs. If you open your consumer unit then normally they are located left to right: main switch, RCD, a couple of MCBs. See example here, with one main switch, two RCDs and a couple of MCBs: screwfix.com/p/m…86G

The RCD here is rated at 30mA leakage but many RCDs in the consumer units are also rated at 30mA leakage. So it's a fight-off on who trips first. In my home, my main RCD trips first.
Edited by: "Bogami" 11th Jul
Bogami11/07/2019 11:24

All new houses or newly rewired houses in the last 10-15 years will have …All new houses or newly rewired houses in the last 10-15 years will have at least one RCD and a couple of MCBs. If you open your consumer unit then normally they are located left to right: main switch, RCD, a couple of MCBs. See example here, with one main switch, two RCDs and a couple of MCBs: https://www.screwfix.com/p/mk-sentry-16-module-10-way-populated-split-load-main-switch-consumer-unit/2186GThe RCD here is rated at 30mA leakage but many RCDs in the consumer units are also rated at 30mA leakage. So it's a fight-off on who trips first. In my home, my main RCD trips first.



Bogami11/07/2019 11:24

All new houses or newly rewired houses in the last 10-15 years will have …All new houses or newly rewired houses in the last 10-15 years will have at least one RCD and a couple of MCBs. If you open your consumer unit then normally they are located left to right: main switch, RCD, a couple of MCBs. See example here, with one main switch, two RCDs and a couple of MCBs: https://www.screwfix.com/p/mk-sentry-16-module-10-way-populated-split-load-main-switch-consumer-unit/2186GThe RCD here is rated at 30mA leakage but many RCDs in the consumer units are also rated at 30mA leakage. So it's a fight-off on who trips first. In my home, my main RCD trips first.


I had my consumer unit replaced about 12 years ago and only have one RCD which is on the main incoming switch, I believe the rating is 100ma which is pretty standard. Luckily, I've never had an occasion where it's tripped because I've mown over a cable or similar, but I always used a plug in unit, just in case.

I say used because I actually just replaced the socket I plug the mower into with an RCD protected one because it was damaged
Great price heat
Quick disclaimer, please don't mess around in your consumer unit (CU), have a look by all means but don't start poking around inside or taking the covers off and no, I'm not a spark.

I've never seen the main breaker switch with RCD protection, it's generally a dual pole (both live and neutral) switch rated at 100amp, there may be some with RCD protection but they are definitely not the norm.

In 2015 the '17th edition' regs come into play which in short means that if you've have a re-wire/consumer unit replaced since then you likely have RCD protection.... don't take that as gospel though, CHECK! Most will have 30mA leakage.

A pic to show you what they look like - ultimatehandyman.co.uk/spl…jpg

1 is the main switch, as mentioned, that is usually just a switch for the incoming into your board from the meter. (You'll now sometimes find another isolator outside of the CU as well as this, this is so a spark can shut down the power to the CU to switch the board) In short ALL power goes through that switch, switch that off and you'll get nothing until its back on, its there to isolate the rest of the board (but the incoming is still live up to that switch!)

3 is an RCD, (note the yellow push button to test it and it has RCD written on it), that protects all of the MCB's, which are the smaller switches to the left on the right side of the board (take note of the gap (marked 2), that 'splits' the board to left and right sides). Each of those will be circuit such as downstairs lights, upstairs lights (or both up and down), up/down sockets (or both) and so on. If there is a fault on any of the MCB's on the right, the main RCD for the right side of the board should trip and kills the power to all of that side.

The left side (the main switch 1 and the 5 MCB's) has no RCD protection on that board pictured. Why do that?

Because originally someone had the idea to keep things like lights separate (or smoke alarms) and always on even if your RCD tripped killing all your sockets. So generally you would have lights on the left, smoke alarms, maybe even your immersion heater. On the right you'd have sockets, cooker etc.

Generally (with new boards) you'll now have an RCD on both sides of the board with multiple MCBs each side and your house will be split into up and down...

Left = upstairs sockets, upstairs lights, shower, etc
Right = downstairs sockets, downstairs lights, cooker etc

Why? So you still have protection everywhere but if your kettle blows up your upstairs sockets etc (the left side) stay on.
Or at 4am you switch the light on in the bathroom and it blows tripping the RCD, you can still go downstairs and find a bulb in the light! (Or just go back to bed and hope it works in the morning)

That means next to 1 you'd have something else that looks like the RCD (labelled 2), then the MCB's for the left side. You still have a main switch, but with 2 sections and 2 RCD's protecting their own sections.

You should use one of these if you don't have RCD protection on your sockets, adding one if you RCD protection on your board wont help much as your CU RCD will likely trip before/when this does, but adding one if you don't already have protection could potentially save your life.
Edited by: "Pebblo" 11th Jul
Oh and RCBO's (which are a combination of MCB and RCD) look like MCB's but also have a test button.

They provide RCD protection on each individual circuit, meaning your downstairs sockets could trip and leave everything else running as normal.... so why not use those all the time? In short cost.

16a Type B MCB (£3.99) - screwfix.com/p/b…253

16a Type B RCBO (£23.99) - screwfix.com/p/b…67x

When you have 10 circuits that's at least another £240 on the job and you can't explain what the difference is easily.
Pebblo11/07/2019 12:11

Oh and RCBO's (which are a combination of MCB and RCD) look like MCB's but …Oh and RCBO's (which are a combination of MCB and RCD) look like MCB's but also have a test button.They provide RCD protection on each individual circuit, meaning your downstairs sockets could trip and leave everything else running as normal.... so why not use those all the time? In short cost.16a Type B MCB (£3.99) - https://www.screwfix.com/p/british-general-16a-sp-type-b-mcb/3525316a Type B RCBO (£23.99) - https://www.screwfix.com/p/british-general-16a-30ma-sp-type-b-mini-rcbo/7067xWhen you have 10 circuits that's at least another £240 on the job and you can't explain what the difference is easily.


Looks like that's what I've got (judging by the note in the top right too):

38041844-9EMQb.jpg

Only annoyance is I wish they'd fitted a wider unit, our current cooker is only a single unit but when we get the kitchen redone I want a double. Suppose they can probably move some stuff around; having the cupboard under the stairs' light on it's own is a bit excessive lol
Because i constantly hear in the news 'people dying just because they didnt buy this safety plug..'
Never heard of it
Bossworld11/07/2019 13:24

Looks like that's what I've got (judging by the note in the top right …Looks like that's what I've got (judging by the note in the top right too):[Image] Only annoyance is I wish they'd fitted a wider unit, our current cooker is only a single unit but when we get the kitchen redone I want a double. Suppose they can probably move some stuff around; having the cupboard under the stairs' light on it's own is a bit excessive lol



Yeah, you have a main switch and then individual RCBO's

As mentioned I'm not a spark (thought about it, but nope!) but afaik it's not all that common to see that setup yet. As mentioned they are more expensive so most go with a split board dual RCD setup although I know sparks that much prefer them.

Side note about the sticker, you 'should' have one of those even with a single RCD in the unit.... weather or not you actually do is another story.

I currently have the split board single RCD setup I mentioned earlier. Main switch with Immersion, Up lights (smoke alarms), Down lights MCB's and then RCD with cooker, sockets (single ring for the whole house, which is more of annoyance than anything) and utility room MCB's. Recently moved in so soon to be replaced.

WRT to the cupboard light, I get your point but they can't wire that in with say the sockets for example, so it depends where the wiring is and how easy it is to get to and say add it to downstairs lights without ripping your house to bits. Oven is high load so at that point you need a sparkies advice, not mine so I'll say nowt
Nicky_Chambers11/07/2019 13:53

Because i constantly hear in the news 'people dying just because they …Because i constantly hear in the news 'people dying just because they didnt buy this safety plug..'Never heard of it


That comment is stupid and ignorant.
You don’t here about people dying because they didn’t have there seatbelt on in a crash but it happens.
Edited by: "diesel_508" 11th Jul
Pebblo11/07/2019 12:04

Quick disclaimer, please don't mess around in your consumer unit (CU), …Quick disclaimer, please don't mess around in your consumer unit (CU), have a look by all means but don't start poking around inside or taking the covers off and no, I'm not a spark.I've never seen the main breaker switch with RCD protection, it's generally a dual pole (both live and neutral) switch rated at 100amp, there may be some with RCD protection but they are definitely not the norm.In 2015 the '17th edition' regs come into play which in short means that if you've have a re-wire/consumer unit replaced since then you likely have RCD protection.... don't take that as gospel though, CHECK! Most will have 30mA leakage.A pic to show you what they look like - http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/split_way_consumer_unit.jpg1 is the main switch, as mentioned, that is usually just a switch for the incoming into your board from the meter. (You'll now sometimes find another isolator outside of the CU as well as this, this is so a spark can shut down the power to the CU to switch the board) In short ALL power goes through that switch, switch that off and you'll get nothing until its back on, its there to isolate the rest of the board (but the incoming is still live up to that switch!)3 is an RCD, (note the yellow push button to test it and it has RCD written on it), that protects all of the MCB's, which are the smaller switches to the left on the right side of the board (take note of the gap (marked 2), that 'splits' the board to left and right sides). Each of those will be circuit such as downstairs lights, upstairs lights (or both up and down), up/down sockets (or both) and so on. If there is a fault on any of the MCB's on the right, the main RCD for the right side of the board should trip and kills the power to all of that side.The left side (the main switch 1 and the 5 MCB's) has no RCD protection on that board pictured. Why do that?Because originally someone had the idea to keep things like lights separate (or smoke alarms) and always on even if your RCD tripped killing all your sockets. So generally you would have lights on the left, smoke alarms, maybe even your immersion heater. On the right you'd have sockets, cooker etc.Generally (with new boards) you'll now have an RCD on both sides of the board with multiple MCBs each side and your house will be split into up and down...Left = upstairs sockets, upstairs lights, shower, etcRight = downstairs sockets, downstairs lights, cooker etcWhy? So you still have protection everywhere but if your kettle blows up your upstairs sockets etc (the left side) stay on.Or at 4am you switch the light on in the bathroom and it blows tripping the RCD, you can still go downstairs and find a bulb in the light! (Or just go back to bed and hope it works in the morning)That means next to 1 you'd have something else that looks like the RCD (labelled 2), then the MCB's for the left side. You still have a main switch, but with 2 sections and 2 RCD's protecting their own sections.You should use one of these if you don't have RCD protection on your sockets, adding one if you RCD protection on your board wont help much as your CU RCD will likely trip before/when this does, but adding one if you don't already have protection could potentially save your life.


BS --> RCD mandatory since 2008. The reglementation change and the rating of the RCD changed. So just checked if you are rated at 30mA rather than 100mA. Do not use this stupid plug because you are not protecting your dishwasher / washing machine which is more lickely to cause your problem rather than something plug occasionaly on this adaptor.
Mr_Gus11/07/2019 09:31

Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for …Microseconds of reaction time that may save your life when outside for instance, because the rcd is nearer you than the one in the house further down the chain of metres & metres of electric cable running round your house not necessarily in the shortest direction & run.Also allows you to check that the unit is working everytime you use it rather rather than guesswork.Logic.


Um, what? People have already listed some valid reasons for getting one, but length of electricity cables isn't one. Electricity travels at the speed of light. It could travel round your house 50 times before making it to your RCD without making the slightest bit of difference in reaction time. Unless the distance from your appliance to your RCD is 300 metres, it won't make even a single microsecond (that is, a millionth of a second) of difference, let alone multiple.
Thank you OP. Ordered one.
Teh.Evil.Cupcake11/07/2019 15:57

Um, what? People have already listed some valid reasons for getting one, …Um, what? People have already listed some valid reasons for getting one, but length of electricity cables isn't one. Electricity travels at the speed of light. It could travel round your house 50 times before making it to your RCD without making the slightest bit of difference in reaction time. Unless the distance from your appliance to your RCD is 300 metres, it won't make even a single microsecond (that is, a millionth of a second) of difference, let alone multiple.


The speed of light is fast, but so are RCDs. Can you give some maths that proves what you're asserting?

Anyway, the sparkies on this forum seem to think they work. (Part of it is that 1 millisecond of electricity is a lot less harmful than 20 milliseconds.)
TheOnlyRick11/07/2019 18:08

The speed of light is fast, but so are RCDs. Can you give some maths that …The speed of light is fast, but so are RCDs. Can you give some maths that proves what you're asserting?Anyway, the sparkies on this forum seem to think they work. (Part of it is that 1 millisecond of electricity is a lot less harmful than 20 milliseconds.)


There are valid reasons for these, but distance to RCD isn't one of them.
A millisecond is 1000 microseconds - if you're going off of length of wiring, you're not getting anywhere near 1 millisecond, let alone 20.

Speed of light is 299,792,458 metres per second. 1 second is 1,000,000 microseconds. 299,792,458/1,000,000 = 299.792 metres per microsecond. Or 299 kilometres per millisecond.

It takes 300 milliseconds to blink. In that time, light would travel 55,923 miles (300^2=90,000, so 90,000 km). The distance from London to Australia is 9,420 miles. Unless your house is really big, as in, your main RCD is over on the moon, I can't see length of wiring being a significant factor.
Edited by: "Teh.Evil.Cupcake" 11th Jul
Teh.Evil.Cupcake11/07/2019 18:16

There are valid reasons for these, but distance to RCD isn't one of them.A …There are valid reasons for these, but distance to RCD isn't one of them.A millisecond is 1000 microseconds - if you're going off of length of wiring, you're not getting anywhere near 1 millisecond, let alone 20.Speed of light is 299,792,458 metres per second. 1 second is 1,000,000 microseconds. 299,792,458/1,000,000 = 299.792 metres per microsecond. Or 299 kilometres per millisecond.It takes 300 milliseconds to blink. In that time, light would travel 55,923 miles (300^2=90,000, so 90,000 km). The distance from London to Australia is 9,420 miles. Unless your house is really big, as in, your main RCD is over on the moon, I can't see length of wiring being a significant factor.


OK... I'm with you on that!

At some point the distance become relevant, surely?

There's that RCD (of sorts) that's fitted on a circular saw that switches it off and drops the blade if your finger touches it and earths it, saving your finger. That must have a pretty quick response time!
Wow, somethings that actually available to reserve n collect!!!
All this talk about various boards of what they will or wont do ?, but at £3 its worth it for peace of mind that you know it will trip when you cut through the lawn mower cable !. As for pressing the reset button each time then whoopi F-doo ! .
I got a couple of these today from my local Homebase. I have the old Wylex type fuse box... none of this new fangled nonsense

They have a few other bits of electrical reduced too sockets, switches, flash looking HDMI cables £5 for two remote control sockets which I barely resisted.

Trouble is the place is full of zombies though.

Oh almost forgot, good quality 4 way mains extension for £1.20, I thought it would be rude not to. Probably the last time I ever go to Homebase ?

By the way another good reason to get one of these is you can easily test it, each time you use even.
Edited by: "simonp99" 13th Jul
I bought one of these and what I found after having it plugged in and power switched on is the RCD device got warm, despite not having anything plugged in to it. Is that normal?
Just checked and plenty of stock around, if you still have a homebase, they closed my nearest.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text