Salter Bread Maker with Gluten Free program Now £30.00 instore @ Robert Dyas (online + Del)
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Salter Bread Maker with Gluten Free program Now £30.00 instore @ Robert Dyas (online + Del)

17
Found 12th Sep 2015
Kneaded to replace our bread maker, and although I'd prefer a Panasonic, budget said not enough dough, so found this Salter one at Robert Dyas originally £49.99, then £39.99, and now £30! which any way you slice it, is not a lot of bread for bread making machine.
Has all the same functions as our old cookworks one (drive belt broken), 12 programs, including a Gluten Free, Jam & Cake, plus the best feature, a timer, so you can rise in the morning to the lovely aroma of fresh baked bread.
Done first test loaf, and will need to adjust ingredient quantities slight, but otherwise a success, nice.

Sorry for the puns, couldn't resist.
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17 Comments
At yeast a nice bun.
Hot for the write up
loving the puns.
http://img.ifcdn.com/images/1227147acaf7ebb82ccb513c419e7c8af8c184c3a184a2301a18d0b55d1e373f_1.jpg
Good price....
Decent price, though I do like gluten.
In fact, if I could buy bread with added gluten - I'd buy that.
Like the vast majority of people who don't suffer from celiac disease, gluten is protein which is actually good for you.

Out of interest, for those who do bake their own bread: why do you do this, when there are plenty of well-priced breads which can be bought from supermarkets/bakeries?
sunama

Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with … Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with added gluten - I'd buy that.Like the vast majority of people who don't suffer from celiac disease, gluten is protein which is actually good for you.Out of interest, for those who do bake their own bread: why do you do this, when there are plenty of well-priced breads which can be bought from supermarkets/bakeries?


Because they are not a patch on home-made bread, and neither are they anything like as fresh.
sunama

Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with … Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with added gluten - I'd buy that.Like the vast majority of people who don't suffer from celiac disease, gluten is protein which is actually good for you.Out of interest, for those who do bake their own bread: why do you do this, when there are plenty of well-priced breads which can be bought from supermarkets/bakeries?


Because most bread contain wheat which is by industry standard literally bleached in "gas baths" with Chlorine and other stuff.
Google it, The Little-Known Secrets about Bleached Flour...
Misshealthyme

Because most bread contain wheat which is by industry standard literally … Because most bread contain wheat which is by industry standard literally bleached in "gas baths" with Chlorine and other stuff. Google it, The Little-Known Secrets about Bleached Flour...



The problem with googling stuff is that there's a lot of misinformation out there and people tend to believe the first thing they read. Such as when you read things scary things about flour that don't apply to the EU.
Misshealthyme

Because most bread contain wheat which is by industry standard literally … Because most bread contain wheat which is by industry standard literally bleached in "gas baths" with Chlorine and other stuff. Google it, The Little-Known Secrets about Bleached Flour...



Also Mercola is probably the worst website on the Internet for "research" and I'd avoid it if I were you.
sunama

Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with … Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with added gluten - I'd buy that.Like the vast majority of people who don't suffer from celiac disease, gluten is protein which is actually good for you.Out of interest, for those who do bake their own bread: why do you do this, when there are plenty of well-priced breads which can be bought from supermarkets/bakeries?


I unfortunately cannot tolerate gluten - and either way there is nothing like the smell of fresh bread in the morning
I use mine because it only costs 35p per FRESH loaf every day


Panasonic
Panasonic
Panasonic
Panasonic
I only use honey and sea salt in my bread with fresh yeast and extra virgin olive oil also yummy
ciarandanielbyrne1

I only use honey and sea salt in my bread with fresh yeast and extra … I only use honey and sea salt in my bread with fresh yeast and extra virgin olive oil also yummy


http://www.8thcivic.com/forums/attachments/introduction-pictures/37363d1299085542-honda-civic-mugen-rr-2009-red-cool-story-bro-hulk.jpg
ciarandanielbyrne1

I only use honey and sea salt in my bread with fresh yeast and extra … I only use honey and sea salt in my bread with fresh yeast and extra virgin olive oil also yummy


Dunno why you use fresh yeast - it means you can't put it on a timer so you can't have it ready when you wake up in the morning.
sunama

Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with … Decent price, though I do like gluten.In fact, if I could buy bread with added gluten - I'd buy that.Like the vast majority of people who don't suffer from celiac disease, gluten is protein which is actually good for you.Out of interest, for those who do bake their own bread: why do you do this, when there are plenty of well-priced breads which can be bought from supermarkets/bakeries?



I don't suffer with celiac so have no knead for the gluten free program myself, but with so many that do, it's obviously a useful option to have.

As for why I use a bread maker? well I can remember asking myself that question 30 years ago when debating to place an order at Panasonic's trade stand (I generally only ordered electronics not white goods), and those first ones were about £200 back then, a lot of dough, but like their Dimension 4 combination microwaves's which were also expensive at £450 then, they sold really well.
Anyway fast forward to 90s and I eventually bought myself my first Combi microwave and a bread maker, and I have to admit I wouldn't be without either.Obviously they've been replaced a few times over the years, and my circumstances now mean I don't have the money I had then, so no Panasonic apart from the Combi.The reason I like the bread maker so much is because I can have fresh bread whenever I want or knead it.We live in a village which only sells kingsmill (rubbish imo), so apart from our weekly Morrisons shop, have no way of buying decent bread in between.It doesn't really save you any dough perhaps, but it is very convenient, and imagine how nice it is, waking up as I have this morning, and I have that lovely aroma of freshly baked bread drifting around the house, that's the beauty of the timer.they can be frustrating when you start out, sometimes a loaf just doesn't turn out as expected, but eventually you get to know your machine.I liked this Salter one because it's smaller, and obviously makes a smaller loaf which suits us as I can have a fresh one each day, as they don't keep well.You can also experiment and make all those expensive speciality breads, I made a cheese & tomato with caramelised onion bread yesterday ...very nice! so that's the other nice thing, you know exactly what's in your bread, which is obviously important to a lot of of us.
So, do you want one now?
Well, I can't loaf about on HUKD anymore now waiting on the doorstep, I knead to get on with my day and make some dough.
pibpob

Dunno why you use fresh yeast - it means you can't put it on a timer so … Dunno why you use fresh yeast - it means you can't put it on a timer so you can't have it ready when you wake up in the morning.


Ah yes i make it before I go to bed but cheers for the heads up if i need to use the timer. I did not know that fact. I still have some breadmaker yeast in the cupboard. Edited as I just realised from the moment you put water in it activates the yeast anyway,does it not?
Edited by: "ciarandanielbyrne1" 14th Sep 2015
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