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Samsung 32-Inch 4K Ultra HD 3840 x 2160 Quantum Dot LED Monitor £372.99 @ Amazon
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Samsung 32-Inch 4K Ultra HD 3840 x 2160 Quantum Dot LED Monitor £372.99 @ Amazon

£372.99Amazon Deals
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Posted 18th Aug

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Samsung LU32H850UMUXEN 32-Inch 4K Ultra HD 3840 x 2160 Quantum Dot LED Monitor - 2xHDMI, Displayport.

Recent price drop on this, think this is the lowest recorded price on Amazon.
Community Updates
The Samsung UH85 has a resolution 4 times higher than Full HD. Its wider workspace allows you to view more webpages, images and texts with less scrolling and zooming. Also, see your 4K content the way it was meant to be seen, with a new level of lifelike detail that makes you feel like you’re really there. Quantum Dot technology, in 1 billion hues, create images in vivid and wide-ranging colours. Coming with refreshingly enriched greens and reds in particular, it simply better meets your professional needs, especially in photo editing and graphic design. It swivels, tilts, pivots, and is height-adjustable, ready to meet the needs of any usage scenario. VESA - supported, it can be installed on a wall or separate arms with ease. Its sleek yet sturdy build, coupled with clean back design, blends in perfectly with any office or personal space. With its four USB 3.0 ports, you can transmit data between devices about 10 times faster than you could with USB 2.0 ports. Two of these ports also enable you to recharge your tablet PCs, smartphones and other mobile devices in super-quick time—3 times faster than USB 2.0 ports.
  • 3840x2160 Ultra HD Ultra High Clarity and stunningly realistic makes PC viewing, editing, working and gaming come alive with incredible lifelike detail
  • Quantum Dot Technology in 1 Billion Colors (10 Bit) creates rich, vivid images especially in photo editing and graphic design
  • 4 x USB 3.0 ports, you can transmit data between devices 10X faster than you could with USB 2.0 ports, also enabling you to recharge your tablet PCs, smartphones and other devices in super-quick time
  • Picture-in-Picture feature allows you to do away with the need for a second monitor. You can resize the second image up to 25% of the screen and position it anywhere you wish
  • The stand swivels, tilts, pivots, and is height-adjustable, ready to meet the needs of any usage scenario. VESA - supported, it can be installed on a wall or separate arms with ease

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Top comments
maxamus00718/08/2019 17:52

But will it be 4k resolution even with a basic gpu or will it struggle?


It will be in 4K unless you use the wrong connector (VGA, DVI) and it could be less than 4K if you use a really old computer e.g. Intel's 4th geneneration CPUs from back in 2013 generally support 4K 60fps, but older models either don't support 4K or only support it at 30fps. Dedicated GPUs are a similar story I think, 2012/2013 and onwards are okay.

4K isn't that hard to render, you need 32MB of memory to store the generated image but you have that on a calculator these days. Things only get tricky when you want to game at that resolution because you start chucking around gigabytes of texture files and demanding all your graphics processing be done as fast as possible.
12 Comments
What sort of gpu would you need to run this just for casual use (non gaming)?
maxamus00718/08/2019 17:42

What sort of gpu would you need to run this just for casual use (non …What sort of gpu would you need to run this just for casual use (non gaming)?


For non gaming pretty much anything from onboard graphics upward will be able to display. A bit like a 65" 4k TV ... Anything can output to it from a phone to DVD to console
DuWolfy18/08/2019 17:49

For non gaming pretty much anything from onboard graphics upward will be …For non gaming pretty much anything from onboard graphics upward will be able to display. A bit like a 65" 4k TV ... Anything can output to it from a phone to DVD to console


But will it be 4k resolution even with a basic gpu or will it struggle?
In the olden days 15+ years ago we used to just right click and change the display to 1080p before it became a TV thing. That was with onboard with no issues, it's the same now as long as your display output can do it.
For example if you only have a DVI output you would only be able display 1920*1200, VGA 2048*1536 or older HDMI 1.0 1920*1200.
Ideally you'd want a display port or HDMI 1.4-2.0 to output a natural 4k
Hope I don't confuse you
Edited by: "DuWolfy" 18th Aug
maxamus00718/08/2019 17:52

But will it be 4k resolution even with a basic gpu or will it struggle?


It will be in 4K unless you use the wrong connector (VGA, DVI) and it could be less than 4K if you use a really old computer e.g. Intel's 4th geneneration CPUs from back in 2013 generally support 4K 60fps, but older models either don't support 4K or only support it at 30fps. Dedicated GPUs are a similar story I think, 2012/2013 and onwards are okay.

4K isn't that hard to render, you need 32MB of memory to store the generated image but you have that on a calculator these days. Things only get tricky when you want to game at that resolution because you start chucking around gigabytes of texture files and demanding all your graphics processing be done as fast as possible.
CampGareth18/08/2019 19:44

It will be in 4K unless you use the wrong connector (VGA, DVI) and it …It will be in 4K unless you use the wrong connector (VGA, DVI) and it could be less than 4K if you use a really old computer e.g. Intel's 4th geneneration CPUs from back in 2013 generally support 4K 60fps, but older models either don't support 4K or only support it at 30fps. Dedicated GPUs are a similar story I think, 2012/2013 and onwards are okay.4K isn't that hard to render, you need 32MB of memory to store the generated image but you have that on a calculator these days. Things only get tricky when you want to game at that resolution because you start chucking around gigabytes of texture files and demanding all your graphics processing be done as fast as possible.


Respect for taking time out for this explain. Thank you.
Respect! Great advice and good detail!
Edited by: "MikeyHenry" 19th Aug
What's the input lag like on these tv screens. I'm also wondering how this would be as a desktop monitor. Most consoles use TVs so the lag must be decent if used as a PC monitor no?
Daves_mate19/08/2019 01:39

What's the input lag like on these tv screens. I'm also wondering how this …What's the input lag like on these tv screens. I'm also wondering how this would be as a desktop monitor. Most consoles use TVs so the lag must be decent if used as a PC monitor no?


To be clear, this is a monitor and not a TV.
The difference tends to be in colour accuracy and display uniformity.
I've got one of these and it's great: the VA panel gives deep blacks; the QLED gives accurate well saturated colours; and the backlight is bright, especially so for sitting close. Only downside is it doesn't support HDR10. AMA.
maxamus00718/08/2019 17:52

But will it be 4k resolution even with a basic gpu or will it struggle?


Performance in the games themselves will vary, 4k is a big ask for modern 3d graphics. For basic games like 2d platformers or even some older 3d titles(although not all of those have 4k support) it will work fine.

But some things you'll need to crank settings down for good performance. You can always render lower resolution, sometimes it's worth it if the games chugging or just looking like garbage as low poly counts at high res aren't nice so lower Res at better settings is more fun.

Depends on your definition of basic I suppose, a high end older gen card will do it fine.
saint_abroad19/08/2019 09:00

To be clear, this is a monitor and not a TV.The difference tends to be in …To be clear, this is a monitor and not a TV.The difference tends to be in colour accuracy and display uniformity.[Video]


Oops! I totally missed that
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