Samsung UE40D6510 Smart LED TV £699 - Currys
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Samsung UE40D6510 Smart LED TV £699 - Currys

4
Found 8th Jan 2012
I picked up one of these today on a comet price match for 689 but for a full price it's 699. I'm blown away by the quality and features and wish I had got one sooner. The smart function is great because I use. Nas and this has dlna so I can stream to the tv. Also has built in wireless.

No idea about quidco etc

4 Comments

No Bargain.

Can get it for £686.98 including delivery, 2 pairs of 3d glasses and a 5 year warranty here:

robertwhyteltd.co.uk/ue4…b-2

Samsung Series D6000 3D TVs have a permanent defect in that 3D is SD not HD. This will not be rectified by software updates. For further details:

avforums.com/for…tml (Note that all 3D Series D6000 TVs are affected, not just the D6530)

wiki.samygo.tv/ind…TVs

forum.samygo.tv/vie…346

facebook.com/pag…861

Excellent 2D performance. But if you want 3D in HD, avoid this TV. Extract from HDTVTest of related D6530 model...

"The first thing we checked out with the UE40D6530 was its 3D capabilities, by running our own 3D resolution test chart. Simply put, it doesn’t do well in this area at all, showing the lowest resolution out of any active-shutter 3D TV we’ve tested. It does seem that Samsung has felt compelled to shoe-horn 3D capabilities into a panel that’s not really suited to it, and the result is what looks like halved vertical resolution. Everything in 3D mode – the image you’re watching, and the 3DTV’s own on-screen menus – displays with jaggedness. This is likely to be even more obvious than any 2D errors might have been, given that it’s advisable to sit closer to the screen of an extra-dimensional television for a more immersive experience.

The vertical resolution check area of our test pattern appeared as a solid grey smudge (it’s supposed to be alternating black and white lines), and the diagonal “stipple” pattern did, too.

Unfortunately for Samsung, there is a large “FULL HD 3D” logo displayed prominently on the UE40D6530′s box, which, we’re sorry to say, simply isn’t true. Given that Samsung has publicly denounced its cross-town rival LG over the latter’s usage of the term “Full HD 3D” to describe its passive Cinema 3D displays, this is more than a little ironic. We can only assume this is a promotional mistake of some sort, or that in these early days of 3D, a lack of test patterns (we had to made our own) means that TV makers may simply not be entirely or collectively aware of such limitations.

The Samsung UE40D6530 isn’t the only 3DTV promoted as “Full HD 3D” to actually not be – none of the 2011 Panasonic Plasma TV panels we’ve reviewed have been able to reproduce all 1080 lines of the 3D image, although they’re very close and the limitation is nowhere near as extreme. In fact, the only TV manufacturers we haven’t seen slip up in the resolution area so far have been Toshiba and Sony (although we’ve not seen all of their 3D range). This is unfortunate, because one of the greatest strengths of the active-shutter 3D system that Samsung promotes against the Passive system (which LG are proponents of) is… resolution. With this resolution limitation, we’re only left with the down-sides of the active-shutter 3D method – namely expensive glasses, and some flicker visible in bright areas.

Moving on, motion was a mixed bag. To our surprise, 50hz video in 3D played back without any stuttering at all – something that even the top-end D8000 series of LED TV needs some help with (but can manage eventually). The same is true of 60hz. Unfortunately, we couldn’t get 24fps films – such as those on Blu-ray 3D – to play back with what we call “cinema quality” motion (ideally, we want the picture to show without any new motion being generated by the TV, and also without any juddering). When we turned off all of the D6530′s motion smoothing controls, it was clearly adding a lot of unwanted juddering into the image. As a result, we did something we normally never do, and experimented with the motion smoothing controls for 3D film content. Normally we avoid these controls, since they introduce the so-called “soap opera effect”, causing filmic motion to become video-like. However, many users may prefer this to the stutter introduced with 3D movies otherwise. Unfortunately, the mode isn’t saved independently for 2D and 3D, so users will have to switch back and forth if they deem this to be a workable solution.

We then did some subjective viewing to check for 3D crosstalk and assess the overall image quality. We’re not sure if it’s down to the resolution handicap blinding us to whatever other qualities the image might have, or if it’s just the smaller 40″ screen size, but the image certainly didn’t seem to have the same depth as Samsung’s other 3D displays. Even Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs, which usually softens even the most grizzled of 3D hearts, didn’t leap out like we were used to. Crosstalk is present, although not to a horribly damaging extent.

All in all, the 3D performance is something of a blight on the Samsung UE40D6530, and only really serves to damage the company’s attempts at promoting active shutter as the superior 3D system."

dooper

Samsung Series D6000 3D TVs have a permanent defect in that 3D is SD not … Samsung Series D6000 3D TVs have a permanent defect in that 3D is SD not HD. This will not be rectified by software updates. For further details:http://www.avforums.com/forums/lcd-led-lcd-tvs/1520482-important-ue40d6530-3d-information.html (Note that all 3D Series D6000 TVs are affected, not just the D6530)http://wiki.samygo.tv/index.php5/Compatibility_Table_for_D_series_TVshttp://forum.samygo.tv/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=2346http://www.facebook.com/pages/Betrug-Fraud-Samsung-3D-Full-HD-Half-HD-Quarter-HD-UExD6xxx/279164975441861Excellent 2D performance. But if you want 3D in HD, avoid this TV. Extract from HDTVTest of related D6530 model..."The first thing we checked out with the UE40D6530 was its 3D capabilities, by running our own 3D resolution test chart. Simply put, it doesn’t do well in this area at all, showing the lowest resolution out of any active-shutter 3D TV we’ve tested. It does seem that Samsung has felt compelled to shoe-horn 3D capabilities into a panel that’s not really suited to it, and the result is what looks like halved vertical resolution. Everything in 3D mode – the image you’re watching, and the 3DTV’s own on-screen menus – displays with jaggedness. This is likely to be even more obvious than any 2D errors might have been, given that it’s advisable to sit closer to the screen of an extra-dimensional television for a more immersive experience.The vertical resolution check area of our test pattern appeared as a solid grey smudge (it’s supposed to be alternating black and white lines), and the diagonal “stipple” pattern did, too. Unfortunately for Samsung, there is a large “FULL HD 3D” logo displayed prominently on the UE40D6530′s box, which, we’re sorry to say, simply isn’t true. Given that Samsung has publicly denounced its cross-town rival LG over the latter’s usage of the term “Full HD 3D” to describe its passive Cinema 3D displays, this is more than a little ironic. We can only assume this is a promotional mistake of some sort, or that in these early days of 3D, a lack of test patterns (we had to made our own) means that TV makers may simply not be entirely or collectively aware of such limitations.The Samsung UE40D6530 isn’t the only 3DTV promoted as “Full HD 3D” to actually not be – none of the 2011 Panasonic Plasma TV panels we’ve reviewed have been able to reproduce all 1080 lines of the 3D image, although they’re very close and the limitation is nowhere near as extreme. In fact, the only TV manufacturers we haven’t seen slip up in the resolution area so far have been Toshiba and Sony (although we’ve not seen all of their 3D range). This is unfortunate, because one of the greatest strengths of the active-shutter 3D system that Samsung promotes against the Passive system (which LG are proponents of) is… resolution. With this resolution limitation, we’re only left with the down-sides of the active-shutter 3D method – namely expensive glasses, and some flicker visible in bright areas.Moving on, motion was a mixed bag. To our surprise, 50hz video in 3D played back without any stuttering at all – something that even the top-end D8000 series of LED TV needs some help with (but can manage eventually). The same is true of 60hz. Unfortunately, we couldn’t get 24fps films – such as those on Blu-ray 3D – to play back with what we call “cinema quality” motion (ideally, we want the picture to show without any new motion being generated by the TV, and also without any juddering). When we turned off all of the D6530′s motion smoothing controls, it was clearly adding a lot of unwanted juddering into the image. As a result, we did something we normally never do, and experimented with the motion smoothing controls for 3D film content. Normally we avoid these controls, since they introduce the so-called “soap opera effect”, causing filmic motion to become video-like. However, many users may prefer this to the stutter introduced with 3D movies otherwise. Unfortunately, the mode isn’t saved independently for 2D and 3D, so users will have to switch back and forth if they deem this to be a workable solution.We then did some subjective viewing to check for 3D crosstalk and assess the overall image quality. We’re not sure if it’s down to the resolution handicap blinding us to whatever other qualities the image might have, or if it’s just the smaller 40″ screen size, but the image certainly didn’t seem to have the same depth as Samsung’s other 3D displays. Even Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs, which usually softens even the most grizzled of 3D hearts, didn’t leap out like we were used to. Crosstalk is present, although not to a horribly damaging extent.All in all, the 3D performance is something of a blight on the Samsung UE40D6530, and only really serves to damage the company’s attempts at promoting active shutter as the superior 3D system."



Do you really feel it is necessary to copy and paste the exact same comment every time someone postes a series 6 Samsung 3d deal??? because its starting to get tiresome to be honest...

Have you got any personal experience of this TV????... I have... I bought it last week (When it was cheaper £649 with 4 pairs of glasses) and I happen to think its a bloody good TV with a stunning 3d Image..

Yes there is a little bit of shadowing on the 3d image, but you show me a 3d TV for under £1200 that does'nt suffer from this, I tried them all before chosing this machine and none of the competition is any better...For the price, this is a great bit of kit...

TheCaptain

Do you really feel it is necessary to copy and paste the exact same … Do you really feel it is necessary to copy and paste the exact same comment every time someone postes a series 6 Samsung 3d deal??? because its starting to get tiresome to be honest...Have you got any personal experience of this TV????... I have... I bought it last week (When it was cheaper £649 with 4 pairs of glasses) and I happen to think its a bloody good TV with a stunning 3d Image..Yes there is a little bit of shadowing on the 3d image, but you show me a 3d TV for under £1200 that does'nt suffer from this, I tried them all before chosing this machine and none of the competition is any better...For the price, this is a great bit of kit...




I for one am glad that Dooper has gone to effort of pointing this out ... I has a 6530 and wondered why i had headaches after watching 3D content. I now have a d7000 (after a few very tiresome phonecalls with samsung) and have none of the problems that i had with the d6530 ...

If like me you had spent 1500 pounds and for a full 3D HD TV (no longer adverised on the box), only to be told by samsung this was not the case you would feel very cheated .... i dont see why you object to people posting relevent information regarding the porduct being voted upon.... read the links posted and you'll see that Samsung have deliberately used a much lower quality panel ...

If like me , you had both TV's and could say there was little disernable difference or could add some contradictory eveidence then please go ahead / But i would advise anyone to steer clear of the d6xxx series as they dont what they used to say on the box (box now does not advertise full HD 3D as it used to ) .... also customers in germany have been offered cashback ... panel quality and internal architechure much better on the d7000/8000 \\

Very relevent point dooper

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