Sanitas Nebuliser - £22.99 @ Lidl
241°Expired

Sanitas Nebuliser - £22.99 @ Lidl

£22.99LIDL Deals
27
Found 24th Sep
Compressed air technology turns liquid medication into a mist for easier inhalation
Suitable for people suffering from colds, asthma and respiratory tract disorders
Includes mouthpiece, adult mask and child mask
3 years warranty

27 Comments

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These being for sale surprise me. Having asthma myself, the nebuliser at the hospital was one of the last things that helped in an attack. Problem is if you use it regularly there's not much else that can be done if you or your kids need to go to a&e. Feels a bit like keeping a defibrillator in the house... Hope it helps someone though!

mean197926 m ago

These being for sale surprise me. Having asthma myself, the nebuliser at …These being for sale surprise me. Having asthma myself, the nebuliser at the hospital was one of the last things that helped in an attack. Problem is if you use it regularly there's not much else that can be done if you or your kids need to go to a&e. Feels a bit like keeping a defibrillator in the house... Hope it helps someone though!

Nebulisers are great for asthma sufferers. Myself and 3 of my kids suffer from asthma the youngest being the worst and they've always helped us. As usual not all things work for everyone so just because a nebuliser didn't work once doesn't mean it won't in the future.

Dunno why anyone would need one at home though as if that was the case surely they'd prescribe you or advise you to buy it. I'm wondering if it can be used as a decongestant device so put a tiny drop off olbas oil in with water and put it on a slow speed to help you.

A was wondering where u get solutions from ? Do you need get them from docs ?

andyanddiane2 h, 2 m ago

A was wondering where u get solutions from ? Do you need get them from …A was wondering where u get solutions from ? Do you need get them from docs ?


We used saline, easy to get from any pharmacy

mean19793 h, 5 m ago

These being for sale surprise me. Having asthma myself, the nebuliser at …These being for sale surprise me. Having asthma myself, the nebuliser at the hospital was one of the last things that helped in an attack. Problem is if you use it regularly there's not much else that can be done if you or your kids need to go to a&e. Feels a bit like keeping a defibrillator in the house... Hope it helps someone though!



Partner had a bad cold and caused an asthma attack went to walk in centre and had her on one almost immediately, with high dose of asthma reliever medicine.


adhkarzf - seems plenty using olibas oil in nebuliser ... google.co.uk/sea…934
Edited by: "morrig" 24th Sep

Pointless, unless you are not eligible for NHS care. By pointless, I mean that anyone who really needs one will be issued one by the NHS.

What about if you filled it with vodka?

Not pointless at all. I have had asthma all my life and have been in hospital several times. Have never been issued with or given a free nebuliser. You are expected to buy your own. Was allowed to borrow one when I was given a special nebulised antibiotic but it had to be returned.

I bought this one from Lloyds pharmacy online. Its excellent. Equally as good as my Omron nebuliser but less than half the price. You can clain any VAT back as an Asthma sufferer.

So heat from me.
Edited by: "johnnyd57uk" 24th Sep

Original Poster

indyjukebox2 h, 36 m ago

Pointless, unless you are not eligible for NHS care. By pointless, I mean …Pointless, unless you are not eligible for NHS care. By pointless, I mean that anyone who really needs one will be issued one by the NHS.

It's only £22.99. For one who really needed one, why would you need to wait for NHS to issue one. Surely it is more affordable and easier to get one yourself. NHS is not everything.

KatsudonVince48 m ago

It's only £22.99. For one who really needed one, why would you need to …It's only £22.99. For one who really needed one, why would you need to wait for NHS to issue one. Surely it is more affordable and easier to get one yourself. NHS is not everything.


Thats quite easy to answer actually.

The clinical requirements to have a home nebuliser are very clear and if you need one, then you need one that is reliable, robust and has a variety of safety testing done on it. This includes testing it for produced particle/droplet size, mean time between failure, delivered dose etc. It also needs to be validated for use based on age, tidal volumes, duration of use and I/E ratios etc

A proper nebuliser would have all this information available with it and wouldn't cost £22.99. It wouldn't be possible to produce one at £22.99 and put it through all that testing. For eg: an Omron Microair is a low end home use machine and costs about £150. I would recommend that if you needed one. Link. This one has no such information available and I would be pretty certain that it is not medically validated or tested.

The problem with this one is that it is a cheap, no name machine, with no available supporting information and relies on the "bargain" mentality to get people to buy it. But is it really a bargain?

To me it is the equivalent of getting a wooden stump instead of a real prosthesis/prosthetic limb. Yes the stump is cheap, easily available and you don't need to wait to get one. But would you get one? I know I wouldn't if I was in that situation. These are medical devices and there is a reason that the cost for a proper nebuliser (or even prosthesis) is so high.

Sorry to upset your deal, but to me this is not safe or tested. And to those that use oils in it. I wouldn't recommend that either. Plain water, or normal saline is fine.

Lastly the NHS is one of the safest ways of obtaining medical equipment for home use at very low/no cost.
Edited by: "indyjukebox" 24th Sep

I didn't even know Santa had respiratory problems

indyjukebox11 h, 2 m ago

Thats quite easy to answer actually.The clinical requirements to have a …Thats quite easy to answer actually.The clinical requirements to have a home nebuliser are very clear and if you need one, then you need one that is reliable, robust and has a variety of safety testing done on it. This includes testing it for produced particle/droplet size, mean time between failure, delivered dose etc. It also needs to be validated for use based on age, tidal volumes, duration of use and I/E ratios etcA proper nebuliser would have all this information available with it and wouldn't cost £22.99. It wouldn't be possible to produce one at £22.99 and put it through all that testing. For eg: an Omron Microair is a low end home use machine and costs about £150. I would recommend that if you needed one. Link. This one has no such information available and I would be pretty certain that it is not medically validated or tested.The problem with this one is that it is a cheap, no name machine, with no available supporting information and relies on the "bargain" mentality to get people to buy it. But is it really a bargain?To me it is the equivalent of getting a wooden stump instead of a real prosthesis/prosthetic limb. Yes the stump is cheap, easily available and you don't need to wait to get one. But would you get one? I know I wouldn't if I was in that situation. These are medical devices and there is a reason that the cost for a proper nebuliser (or even prosthesis) is so high.Sorry to upset your deal, but to me this is not safe or tested. And to those that use oils in it. I wouldn't recommend that either. Plain water, or normal saline is fine.Lastly the NHS is one of the safest ways of obtaining medical equipment for home use at very low/no cost.


Disagree, and if your a medical professional of some sort, concerned about your blanket statement.

Firstly there are EU directive for medical devices so it is tested safe in that regard.

Your argument probably holds true for the very worst Copd sufferers, the ones resp docs tend to advise nebs (but not necessarily provide) however in reality they are not the only users.

Indyjukebox

Have to say your comment is nonsense in relation to this Nebuliser. Yes there are some rubbish ones out there but this is not one of them.

As a chronic Asthmatic and medical professional I can confirm that this is an excellent machine. Its German made and has a 3 year guarantee. Its also very cheap but of very good quality. With a flow of > 0.2 ml/min its adequate for nebulising most asthmatic nebules. Its nowhere as powerful as my Philips Sidestream nebuliser but at a 1/4 of the price and its perfect for everyday use.

You cannot get free Nebulisers on the NHS. Some Health Authorities loan them out and a small few do give them out free. For those who cant afford an Omron or a Philips this will do perfectly. Dont be put off by the negative comments on here. You should get yourself a better mask than the one supplied.

shareef13 h, 39 m ago

Disagree, and if your a medical professional of some sort, concerned about …Disagree, and if your a medical professional of some sort, concerned about your blanket statement.Firstly there are EU directive for medical devices so it is tested safe in that regard.Your argument probably holds true for the very worst Copd sufferers, the ones resp docs tend to advise nebs (but not necessarily provide) however in reality they are not the only users.




What are you going on about? What EU directive? Where does this machine say it adheres to any directives? Substantiate your claim, rather than saying random things.

The latter half of your statement makes no sense at all. I prescribe nebulisers in my job, day in and out. Who are these other users of nebulisers? And how is this nebuliser suitable for them?

johnnyd57uk11 h, 13 m ago

Indyjukebox Have to say your comment is nonsense in relation to this …Indyjukebox Have to say your comment is nonsense in relation to this Nebuliser. Yes there are some rubbish ones out there but this is not one of them. As a chronic Asthmatic and medical professional I can confirm that this is an excellent machine. Its German made and has a 3 year guarantee. Its also very cheap but of very good quality. With a flow of > 0.2 ml/min its adequate for nebulising most asthmatic nebules. Its nowhere as powerful as my Philips Sidestream nebuliser but at a 1/4 of the price and its perfect for everyday use.You cannot get free Nebulisers on the NHS. Some Health Authorities loan them out and a small few do give them out free. For those who cant afford an Omron or a Philips this will do perfectly. Dont be put off by the negative comments on here. You should get yourself a better mask than the one supplied.


Well I am very concerned you claim to be a medical professional, yet just talk about flow/where it is made/the 3 year guarantee. Really? the 3 year guarantee makes it suitable for users? Surely if you understood respiratory physiology, you would understand the suitability of a nebuliser depends on more variables than just flow or where it is made or how long the guarantee is? Yes it may work for you, but what guarantee is there that it works across various age groups and inspiratory flows?

More worryingly you state that you cannot get a free nebuliser on the NSH. Utter tosh. Of course you can. There are very few CCGs (BTW Health Authorities died many years ago) that would dare deny a patient who needs a nebuliser, one or even two. I hand them out everyday. That is to patients who actually need it. Not just some random people who feel they need it because they think they know better than the specialists. Or claim to be a medical professional and advocate crap on a deals website.

indyjukebox2 h, 40 m ago

What are you going on about? What EU directive? Where does this machine …What are you going on about? What EU directive? Where does this machine say it adheres to any directives? Substantiate your claim, rather than saying random things.The latter half of your statement makes no sense at all. I prescribe nebulisers in my job, day in and out. Who are these other users of nebulisers? And how is this nebuliser suitable for them?


Can't really be much clearer. EU directives for Safety of medical devices, look it up yourself.

Indyjukebox / shareef

Absolute tosh. You have absolutely no experience of nebulisers or of the NHS. Nebulisers are not free on the NHS full stop as any asthmatic reading this will know. They are occasionally loaned out by wards, chest clinics and surgeries, but less so these days because of cross infection issues. Prescriptions for asthmatic medications are not free either except after the age of 60 or are you going to tell me otherwise..

This is an excellent machine for the money and I cannot comprehend your petty reasons for rubbishing it. I guess you work for Omron or the likes. You certainly dont have asthma and have no idea how dangerous it can be. This machine will nebulise adequately any respiratory medications prescribed by a Doctor.

reference page for anyone interested in this machine. Its available from alternative suppliers if you cant find one at Lidl.

lidl-service.com/sta…pdf

Great post "KatsudonVinc" especially for the 5.4M asthmatics out there. I use this machine to nebulise Ventolin and RespEase. I use my "on loan" Philips Sidestream to nebulise my Colomycin as it is a thicker solution.
These machines are lifesavers. Pity your post attracted a few pathetic trolls but thats HUKD for you.
Edited by: "johnnyd57uk" 26th Sep

johnnyd57uk23 h, 11 m ago

Indyjukebox / shareefAbsolute tosh. You have absolutely no experience of …Indyjukebox / shareefAbsolute tosh. You have absolutely no experience of nebulisers or of the NHS. Nebulisers are not free on the NHS full stop as any asthmatic reading this will know. They are occasionally loaned out by wards, chest clinics and surgeries, but less so these days because of cross infection issues. Prescriptions for asthmatic medications are not free either except after the age of 60 or are you going to tell me otherwise..This is an excellent machine for the money and I cannot comprehend your petty reasons for rubbishing it. I guess you work for Omron or the likes. You certainly dont have asthma and have no idea how dangerous it can be. This machine will nebulise adequately any respiratory medications prescribed by a Doctor.reference page for anyone interested in this machine. Its available from alternative suppliers if you cant find one at Lidl.http://www.lidl-service.com/static/9098732/64741_EN.pdf


Not quite sure why that was directed at me?

Original Poster

indyjukebox24th Sep

Thats quite easy to answer actually.The clinical requirements to have a …Thats quite easy to answer actually.The clinical requirements to have a home nebuliser are very clear and if you need one, then you need one that is reliable, robust and has a variety of safety testing done on it. This includes testing it for produced particle/droplet size, mean time between failure, delivered dose etc. It also needs to be validated for use based on age, tidal volumes, duration of use and I/E ratios etcA proper nebuliser would have all this information available with it and wouldn't cost £22.99. It wouldn't be possible to produce one at £22.99 and put it through all that testing. For eg: an Omron Microair is a low end home use machine and costs about £150. I would recommend that if you needed one. Link. This one has no such information available and I would be pretty certain that it is not medically validated or tested.The problem with this one is that it is a cheap, no name machine, with no available supporting information and relies on the "bargain" mentality to get people to buy it. But is it really a bargain?To me it is the equivalent of getting a wooden stump instead of a real prosthesis/prosthetic limb. Yes the stump is cheap, easily available and you don't need to wait to get one. But would you get one? I know I wouldn't if I was in that situation. These are medical devices and there is a reason that the cost for a proper nebuliser (or even prosthesis) is so high.Sorry to upset your deal, but to me this is not safe or tested. And to those that use oils in it. I wouldn't recommend that either. Plain water, or normal saline is fine.Lastly the NHS is one of the safest ways of obtaining medical equipment for home use at very low/no cost.


Ah good explanation.

shareef26th Sep

Can't really be much clearer. EU directives for Safety of medical devices, …Can't really be much clearer. EU directives for Safety of medical devices, look it up yourself.


Ok last try. After this I give up. Safety does not equal efficacy. I dont question this devices safety. I question its efficacy till I have access to its specifications. Make sense?

johnnyd57uk26th Sep

Indyjukebox / shareefAbsolute tosh. You have absolutely no experience of …Indyjukebox / shareefAbsolute tosh. You have absolutely no experience of nebulisers or of the NHS. Nebulisers are not free on the NHS full stop as any asthmatic reading this will know. They are occasionally loaned out by wards, chest clinics and surgeries, but less so these days because of cross infection issues. Prescriptions for asthmatic medications are not free either except after the age of 60 or are you going to tell me otherwise..This is an excellent machine for the money and I cannot comprehend your petty reasons for rubbishing it. I guess you work for Omron or the likes. You certainly dont have asthma and have no idea how dangerous it can be. This machine will nebulise adequately any respiratory medications prescribed by a Doctor.reference page for anyone interested in this machine. Its available from alternative suppliers if you cant find one at Lidl.http://www.lidl-service.com/static/9098732/64741_EN.pdf


I don't work for Omron. I run a NHS difficult asthma clinic. Thank you for the link, but it makes no reference to its capabilities or specifications. Thanks for telling an NHS consultant what my clinic can or cannot do. My son has difficult to control atopic asthma. I would never use this machine on him.

The link you provided only specifies medicine flow and nothing else. If you are happy use it. I have to stand by my professional judgment.

Indyjukebox ......your comments are pathetic as everyone reading this article will see. This is a perfectly adequate machine for £23. I am not telling you or your team what to do but as a typical jobsworth you have over technicalised a very simple post.

I have had asthma and various complications for 60 years. I have used all sorts of nebulisers in that period. This one works as well as any of them. I have been using it for about 18 months and the compressor is still working perfectly. I have other branded name machines in the past that have broken down within their warranty period. This machine does have its limitations as I said before but is fine for Ventolin , Respease etc.

Some reviews here including what happens if one breaks down :- boards.ie/b/t…947

So anyone reading this post please dont be put off by these ridiculous comments.

Finally can I reiterate Nebulisers are not free on the NHS as previously suggested and as all asthmatics will know. If your local HA are prepared to give you one free then you are a very lucky person indeed. The nebules are not free either except for patients complying with the exceptions stated on the back of your prescription. Please dont be confused by some of the misleading comments in this post.
Edited by: "johnnyd57uk" 28th Sep

Original Poster

There are so many evidence comments made by experienced personal working in the health trade. I think it is still up to the consumer to decide but seriously NHS isn't everything. It is the most best thing in life in the UK and I do see many abusing it. That is sad

indyjukebox24th Sep

Sorry to upset your deal, but to me this is not safe or tested.



indyjukebox27th Sep

Ok last try. After this I give up. Safety does not equal efficacy. I dont …Ok last try. After this I give up. Safety does not equal efficacy. I dont question this devices safety. I question its efficacy till I have access to its specifications. Make sense?


you mean apart from where you say it here?
Edited by: "shareef" 29th Sep

indyjukebox27th Sep

Thanks for telling an NHS consultant what my clinic can or cannot do.


Respiratory doctor? Or respiratory physiologist?
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