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Scott Solace 30 2017 Road Bike £829.99 + Free DX 24h Delivery @ Rutland Cycling
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Scott Solace 30 2017 Road Bike £829.99 + Free DX 24h Delivery @ Rutland Cycling

£829.99£1,69951%Rutland Cycling Deals
39
Posted 19th Jun

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Lovely looking cycle for £849 all in, it is the 2017 model but the spec is still really good for this money. If I had the cash spare I'd be all over it. There's a few sizes in stock for this price, which I've added below - Under the image is the full specs as well.

Use code SAVE20 for this price

Sizes in stock at time of post:
  • 47cm
  • 49cm
  • 52cm
  • 54cm

3249587.jpg
  • Frame - Solace HMF / IMP Carbon technology Road Comfort geometry
  • Fork - Solace HMF 1 1/8" Carbon steerer Alloy Dropout
  • Shock - N/A
  • Number of Gears - 20
  • Shifters - Shimano Tiagra ST-4700 Dual control 20 Speed
  • Chainset - Shimano Tiagra FC-4700 Compact Hyperdrive
  • Chainrings - 50x34 T
  • Cassette - Shimano CS-HG500 10 Speed 11-32
  • Chain - KMC X10
  • Front Derailleur - Shimano Tiagra FD-4700
  • Rear Derailleur - Shimano Tiagra Black RD-4700-GS 20 Speed
  • Bottom Bracket - Shimano BB-RS500-PB
  • Pedals - Not Included
  • Rims - Syncros Race 22 Front 24 / 28 Rear
  • Front Hub - Formula Race 22 24 H
  • Rear Hub - Formula Race 22 28 H
  • Front Tyre - Continental Grand Sport Race Fold 700×25C
  • Rear Tyre - Continental Grand Sport Race Fold 700×25C
  • Front Brake - Shimano Tiagra BR-4700 Super SLR Dual pivot Tektro 541 direct mount rear
  • Rear Brake - Shimano Tiagra BR-4700 Super SLR Dual pivot Tektro 541 direct mount rear
  • Brake Levers - Shimano
  • Handlebars - Syncros RR2.0 Anatomic 31.8mm
  • Grips - Included
  • Headset - Syncros Integrated
  • Stem - Syncros RR2.0 1 1/8" / four Bolt 31.8mm
  • Saddle - Syncros FL2.5
  • Seatpost - Syncros RR2.5 27.2/350mm
  • Post Clamp - Included
  • Weight - 8.36 kg
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Sorry but with Tiagra set shouldve been this price in the first place ... just my two cents!
39 Comments
I think another 10% off with a voucher would be a hot deal. £20 voucher - nah. Sorry, just my view.
tawse5719/06/2019 18:24

I think another 10% off with a voucher would be a hot deal. £20 voucher - …I think another 10% off with a voucher would be a hot deal. £20 voucher - nah. Sorry, just my view.


It's already half price!
Sorry but with Tiagra set shouldve been this price in the first place ... just my two cents!
johnnystorm19/06/2019 19:13

It's already half price!




Are any bikes actually worth anywhere near their RRP to begin with? I personally don't think so.
Tiagra £1699 I don't think so
tawse5719/06/2019 19:22

Are any bikes actually worth anywhere near their RRP to begin with? I …Are any bikes actually worth anywhere near their RRP to begin with? I personally don't think so.


It's the frame you're paying for. We had an alloy bike with Sora on here for £629 that I got shouted down for saying wasn't a bargain. This has a significantly better frameset & groupset.
With a 105 mixed groupset (cheaper chainset and brakes etc) I'd say it's a good value bike at this price.
Its branded carbon after all if a little unexciting. Certainly not cutting edge.
Upgrade from 10sp to 11sp is quite expensive so I wouldn't recommend getting a 10sp bike.
Which is the better deal, this or the other Scott posted today? The other is cheaper but not sure what other differences there are.
Edited by: "Whitedot" 19th Jun
basergorkobal19/06/2019 20:26

With a 105 mixed groupset (cheaper chainset and brakes etc) I'd say it's a …With a 105 mixed groupset (cheaper chainset and brakes etc) I'd say it's a good value bike at this price.Its branded carbon after all if a little unexciting. Certainly not cutting edge.Upgrade from 10sp to 11sp is quite expensive so I wouldn't recommend getting a 10sp bike.


It does have the newer tiagra 4700 though. I have both 10 & 11 speed bikes; agree the upgrade is costly. However for most people 10 is fine. If you race I can see 11 would be worth it but I think this is a fairly small proportion of riders.

I know it's sacrilege but allot of people seem to have bikes that outstrips their ability; and this includes me.
Edited by: "afroylnt" 19th Jun
Whitedot19/06/2019 20:49

Which is the better deal, this or the other Scott posted today? The other …Which is the better deal, this or the other Scott posted today? The other is cheaper but not sure what other differences there are.


Addict has racier geometry. The Solace was evolved out of the CR1, the bike the Scott team used for Roubaix cobbles.

Foil - Aero bike, less comfort

Addict- all rounder

CR1/Solace- endurance/rougher roads/comfier
afroylnt19/06/2019 21:35

It does have the newer tiagra 4700 though. I have both 10 & 11 speed …It does have the newer tiagra 4700 though. I have both 10 & 11 speed bikes; agree the upgrade is costly. However for most people 10 is fine. If you race I can see 11 would be worth it but I think this is a fairly small proportion of riders.I know it's sacrilege but allot of people seem to have bikes that outstrips their ability; and this includes me.


I just bought a bike with the new tiagra and I'm very impressed with the shifting versus my 105 & ultegra equipped bikes. "Fresh" Tiagra beats "worn in" better kit!
johnnystorm19/06/2019 22:20

Addict has racier geometry. The Solace was evolved out of the CR1, the …Addict has racier geometry. The Solace was evolved out of the CR1, the bike the Scott team used for Roubaix cobbles.Foil - Aero bike, less comfortAddict- all rounderCR1/Solace- endurance/rougher roads/comfier


Cheers. The description of the brakes is a bit weird, in the main blurb it says they're Tiagra but the description says ' Shimano Tiagra BR-4700 Super SLR Dual pivot Tektro 541 direct mount rear', suggesting there were two options or they're different front to back.
Edited by: "Whitedot" 19th Jun
basergorkobal19/06/2019 20:26

With a 105 mixed groupset (cheaper chainset and brakes etc) I'd say it's a …With a 105 mixed groupset (cheaper chainset and brakes etc) I'd say it's a good value bike at this price.Its branded carbon after all if a little unexciting. Certainly not cutting edge.Upgrade from 10sp to 11sp is quite expensive so I wouldn't recommend getting a 10sp bike.



I have 10 speed Tiagra on my TCR and 11 speed 105 on my Defy and there isnt a massive difference. No way would I have paid the RRP for this but isnt too shabby for just over £800.
Whitedot19/06/2019 22:36

Cheers. The description of the brakes is a bit weird, in the main blurb it …Cheers. The description of the brakes is a bit weird, in the main blurb it says they're Tiagra but the description says ' Shimano Tiagra BR-4700 Super SLR Dual pivot Tektro 541 direct mount rear', suggesting there were two options or they're different front to back.


If you look at the pic you can see the front brake but not the rear. I think the rear brake is mounted on the chainstays. That allows use of a beefier brake on the bigger/stiffer chainstays and the use of more slender seatstays so they can be more compliant.
Yeah I realised, but two different manufacturers? Not seen that before whilst I've been looking for a new bike the last few months.
Does anyone know where these bikes are made. Scott are owned by a Korean company who makes most of their goods in Bangladesh and just wondered if this was a Bangladesh carbon frame which is the lowest in the pecking order of quality. I think it would be re-assuring to know if this older bike was made in Taiwan or mainland China which tend to be better quality. Might actually be better frames than their later models. So difficult to work out bike quality nowadays when most brands are just importers who buy from the far east and not knowing the actual factories they have bought from especially when they keep moving factories (whoever is cheaper at the time). Always worth checking the weight limits of the bike and how long the warranty is on the frame this can often indirectly reveal frame quality. It costs more money to make a stronger lighter frame with consistent manufacturing quality.
GB270520/06/2019 00:19

I have 10 speed Tiagra on my TCR and 11 speed 105 on my Defy and there …I have 10 speed Tiagra on my TCR and 11 speed 105 on my Defy and there isnt a massive difference. No way would I have paid the RRP for this but isnt too shabby for just over £800.


There is a difference. It's the extra cog in the cassette;)
I agree that in terms of shifting quality there isn't much between 4700 and 5800.

I'm talking in pure value terms I wouldn't get into 10sp at this price point. It's more economical to pay a bit extra and go 11sp. The initial outlay will be lower than trying to upgrade further down the line.

Been there and done that.
bonzobanana20/06/2019 10:56

Does anyone know where these bikes are made. Scott are owned by a Korean …Does anyone know where these bikes are made. Scott are owned by a Korean company who makes most of their goods in Bangladesh and just wondered if this was a Bangladesh carbon frame which is the lowest in the pecking order of quality. I think it would be re-assuring to know if this older bike was made in Taiwan or mainland China which tend to be better quality. Might actually be better frames than their later models. So difficult to work out bike quality nowadays when most brands are just importers who buy from the far east and not knowing the actual factories they have bought from especially when they keep moving factories (whoever is cheaper at the time). Always worth checking the weight limits of the bike and how long the warranty is on the frame this can often indirectly reveal frame quality. It costs more money to make a stronger lighter frame with consistent manufacturing quality.


The weight limit for this bike as a category 1 seems to be 117-120kg. Is that any good?

Sources: help.scott-sports.com/hc/…es-
s3.amazonaws.com/ass…pdf
Don't even get pedals! /S
Whitedot20/06/2019 12:19

The weight limit for this bike as a category 1 seems to be 117-120kg. Is …The weight limit for this bike as a category 1 seems to be 117-120kg. Is that any good?Sources: https://help.scott-sports.com/hc/en-gb/articles/115000817605-Is-there-a-rider-weight-limit-for-SCOTT-bikes-https://s3.amazonaws.com/assets.scott-sports.com/manuals/2017/bike/bikes/SCOTT_Short Manual_EN_2017-02-03_Web.pdf


That's a bit weird in the manual they state up to 120kg or 330lbs but 120kg is 265lbs not 330lbs. 120kg is right in the middle. Btwin are the lowest at 100kg including bike weight, luggage etc and someone like Giant or many American brands are something like 125kg for the rider weight alone with a total load of 145-150kg for a road bike. Highest I've seen for a road bike is the Spanish brand 'BH' which I think was 155kg for a road bike total load. Don't confuse total load with rider weight. The Scott figure is total load including the bike weight itself. The Scott figure is respectable and inline with other brands like Canyon, Focus and quite a few others all brands that swop factories in the far east regularly to get the best price who may be a little uncertain of frame quality. Also consider the frame warranty they are offering too as that is important. The lowest frame warranty I have seen I think is 2 years but can go to lifetime or effectively 25 years I guess and anywhere in between. Low weight limits and short warranties is the danger sign. However certification of frames aims for a 7-10 years lifespan so I'm guessing where the manufacturer states a lowish weight limit and short warranty the frame certification probably shows frame failure at lower levels of repeated stress and under lower weights.


fuji-ta.com/bic…ory


Fuji-ta are the world's biggest bicycle manufacturer by volume but in recent years they have lost out to Cambodia and Bangladesh as they don't get hit by additional duties by the EU and the USA. They are a big supplier to many brands today for their mid-range bikes but used to supply lower end bikes too. Many such bikes would have a fuji-ta frame but be assembled in another country. This Scott carbon frame could be fuji-ta due to being manufactured in 2016. That would be a good thing compared to Bangladesh or Cambodia.
Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at this price range. It's not much lighter than aluminium bikes, the components are worse/older, and though some people say the stiffness and ride quality is better, there are others that say it's not very noticeable. Not sure I could be bothered with the other maintenance/durability considerations such as using carbon paste, worrying about cracking etc. Then there's the whole grey area about whether they should be used on an indoor trainer or not.
Whitedot20/06/2019 13:12

Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at …Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at this price range. It's not much lighter than aluminium bikes, the components are worse/older, and though some people say the stiffness and ride quality is better, there are others that say it's not very noticeable. Not sure I could be bothered with the other maintenance/durability considerations such as using carbon paste, worrying about cracking etc. Then there's the whole grey area about whether they should be used on an indoor trainer or not.


I haven't found a good aluminium frame at this price point and think the lower quality carbon frame will be fine. Frame stiffness is not really an issue unless you race or are a very powerful rider.
afroylnt20/06/2019 14:34

I haven't found a good aluminium frame at this price point and think the …I haven't found a good aluminium frame at this price point and think the lower quality carbon frame will be fine. Frame stiffness is not really an issue unless you race or are a very powerful rider.


What's your definition of good? Genuine question, I don't know. The Sensa Trentino (aluminium) from Merlin is £55 cheaper with a full R7000 105 groupset. Almost the same claimed weight.
Whitedot20/06/2019 15:00

What's your definition of good? Genuine question, I don't know. The Sensa …What's your definition of good? Genuine question, I don't know. The Sensa Trentino (aluminium) from Merlin is £55 cheaper with a full R7000 105 groupset. Almost the same claimed weight.


It would be provides a comfortable/non jaring ride.

I have two trek domane with isospeed; they give a non-jaring ride. But cost wise more they are more than this bike but I paid less as both were purchased second hand but I know that there is a risk when buying carbon framed bikes in this way so does not suit everyone.
Edited by: "afroylnt" 20th Jun
I have a Scott Solace of this generation, although mine is a bit posher (Ultegra disc version). The ride and comfort of this bike is absolutely superb - I can ride this bike all day virtually without a break and experience no discomfort whatsoever. It's stiff in the right places, so feels responsive and sharp on the climbs and descents, while remaining compliant enough so you don't need to hold your teeth in while riding on rougher roads. It's a fantastic frameset and an absolutely mile-eater. It's also reasonably, but not stupidly light. Mine comfortably takes 28mm tyres, but I can't comment if the rim version is limited to the 25mm supplied with it.

I would say though that I wouldn't even consider the rim brake version, purely due to the daft caliper location. Yes, in theory you get stiffer, more powerful brakes, but this needs to be offset by them being sat in the most filthy part of the bike where they are likely to get all of the road muck and salt layered into them. They are also trickier to maintain and would require more attention due to the exposure to the elements. It's not the first bike to put the rear brake here, but there's a reason why most don't and for the UK, unless you're only ever going to ride it when the sun is shining, I'd look elsewhere.
Edited by: "daern" 20th Jun
Whitedot20/06/2019 08:39

Yeah I realised, but two different manufacturers? Not seen that before …Yeah I realised, but two different manufacturers? Not seen that before whilst I've been looking for a new bike the last few months.


I don't think Shimano make the "hidden" rear brakes. They can be a bit traditional, same reason why you often see other brands chainsets with Shimano gears as they won't make anything other than 24mm spindle chainsets or sub compact ring sizes (save for one cx chainsets and the new grx)
Whitedot20/06/2019 13:12

Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at …Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at this price range. It's not much lighter than aluminium bikes, the components are worse/older, and though some people say the stiffness and ride quality is better, there are others that say it's not very noticeable. Not sure I could be bothered with the other maintenance/durability considerations such as using carbon paste, worrying about cracking etc. Then there's the whole grey area about whether they should be used on an indoor trainer or not.


I think it is because you're not looking at a cheap 800 quid carbon bike, it's a 1600 quid carbon bike.
Whitedot20/06/2019 13:12

Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at …Cheers. To be honest I'm not convinced carbon is worth bothering with at this price range. It's not much lighter than aluminium bikes, the components are worse/older, and though some people say the stiffness and ride quality is better, there are others that say it's not very noticeable. Not sure I could be bothered with the other maintenance/durability considerations such as using carbon paste, worrying about cracking etc. Then there's the whole grey area about whether they should be used on an indoor trainer or not.


All good points but aluminium frames always get weaker with time and often ride more harshly. Where as carbon frames often have far better ride quality but are more vulnerable to damage. The other point is the most dangerous carbon fibre component is the forks which are often fitted to aluminium framed bikes too. That is the component most likely to fail without warning and the most dangerous. Failures of carbon fibre frames are less likely to be as dangerous. That info is from Luescher Technik on youtube who is a big carbon fibre fan and expert repairer of carbon fibre frames. From a safety viewpoint it is better to have a carbon fibre frame with steel forks than an aluminium frame and carbon fibre forks, not that anyone configures a bike that way with a carbon fibre frame.

Personally I wouldn't get a carbon fibre bike as an everyday commuting, shopping type bike I'd stick to an aluminium or steel frame with steel forks and would only consider carbon fibre as a weekend leisure riding or competitive racing type bike. I saw a carbon fibre bike locked with other bikes in a rack and the 2 older road bikes had fallen over onto the carbon fibre bike and could have caused damage, I didn't stop to look in detail. Not really robust bikes that can take much abuse with everyday riding and I prefer bikes that take more abuse and are less appealing to thieves. I always find it re-assuring in the past if I lock my bike up in a rack that has a higher end bike also locked up as that bike is far more likely to get stolen.

Here is a thief who has decided he would rather have this nice carbon fibre bike rather than the lower end bike he currently has. I guess my point is not having to worry about theft so much is for me an appealing part of having a lower end bike.


youtube.com/wat…iYc
bonzobanana21/06/2019 13:06

Here is a thief who has decided he would rather have this nice carbon …Here is a thief who has decided he would rather have this nice carbon fibre bike rather than the lower end bike he currently has. I guess my point is not having to worry about theft so much is for me an appealing part of having a lower end bike.


OK, your point about nailing a posh bike to some railings is fair, but implying that you shouldn't even own a half-decent bike is a bit over the top, tbh. After all, my takeaway from that video was "bike securely locked to bike rack successfully foils potential thief. Viewers mostly disappointed that noone chose to run him over too." If you have nice kit, you need to look after it, but I'm afraid that saying there are bad people out there, so I won't own a bike worth more than £300 is both unrealistic and, honestly, a bit defeatist. There are plenty of people who commute between home and office and have secure storage at both ends (mine literally sits by my desk!) and similarly, plenty that choose to use carbon bikes for such activities too.

It's also worth noting that you'd really struggle to find any bikes in the mid-range (way cheaper than list price on this one) that don't have at least a carbon fork, because of the material's natural dampening effect on road noise and general reduction in the cost of such components on a frameset. Many cheaper bikes might pair one with an alloy steerer, but above £1000 I'd expect full carbon forks on most road bikes. Sure, there are still bikes available with full steel, aluminium or titanium builds, but they are becoming more niche and you'll pay heavily for the privilege of owning one.

For me, at least, I now only own carbon bikes, having gradually whittled away the alloy ones over the years and value the ride dynamic and light weight of them. I'm yet to have one break on me...at least not without incurring a fair amount of blame myself :-)
Edited by: "daern" 21st Jun
daern21/06/2019 15:24

OK, your point about nailing a posh bike to some railings is fair, but …OK, your point about nailing a posh bike to some railings is fair, but implying that you shouldn't even own a half-decent bike is a bit over the top, tbh. After all, my takeaway from that video was "bike securely locked to bike rack successfully foils potential thief. Viewers mostly disappointed that noone chose to run him over too." If you have nice kit, you need to look after it, but I'm afraid that saying there are bad people out there, so I won't own a bike worth more than £300 is both unrealistic and, honestly, a bit defeatist. There are plenty of people who commute between home and office and have secure storage at both ends (mine literally sits by my desk!) and similarly, plenty that choose to use carbon bikes for such activities too.It's also worth noting that you'd really struggle to find any bikes in the mid-range (way cheaper than list price on this one) that don't have at least a carbon fork, because of the material's natural dampening effect on road noise and general reduction in the cost of such components on a frameset. Many cheaper bikes might pair one with an alloy steerer, but above £1000 I'd expect full carbon forks on most road bikes. Sure, there are still bikes available with full steel, aluminium or titanium builds, but they are becoming more niche and you'll pay heavily for the privilege of owning one.For me, at least, I now only own carbon bikes, having gradually whittled away the alloy ones over the years and value the ride dynamic and light weight of them. I'm yet to have one break on me...at least not without incurring a fair amount of blame myself :-)


I didn't say not to have a more expensive bike I said for everyday use where it could get abused and stolen it could be overkill and less than ideal. There are a lot of entry level Claris road bikes that have aluminium frames and steel forks like the Carrera Virtuoso. They are about £300 thereabouts. In your situation you have more control either end of your journey but that may not be the same for everyone. Some people may need to store their bike outside in a less secure area both at home and at work and may stop off at other locations where the bike isn't securely stored, shops etc. It's really down to your area I guess and how chilled you are about your bike being stolen or damaged. Some people think positively until sh*t happens others think about sh*t happening before the event especially in a high crime area. I've seen forum postings where people have bought high end bikes for normal use and then seem to be constantly worried about them. I was looking at 2 Brompton bicycles outside a pub and I could see someone looking out the window clearly in panic mode thinking I was going to steal or maybe scratch up the bikes who was clearly one of the owners of those bikes. I just feel that for most people the tiny performance gains of a high end bike can be offset by many negatives to owning such a bike be it more easily damaged, more likely stolen and higher maintenance costs requiring higher cost replacement parts.
bonzobanana21/06/2019 16:13

There are a lot of entry level Claris road bikes that have aluminium …There are a lot of entry level Claris road bikes that have aluminium frames and steel forks like the Carrera Virtuoso.......... I just feel that for most people the tiny performance gains of a high end bike can be offset by many negatives to owning such a bike be it more easily damaged, more likely stolen and higher maintenance costs requiring higher cost replacement parts.


You've definitely gone from one extreme to the other there - from a steel-forked, low-end Halfords bike, to a high-end bike. There's a whole load of stuff in between which offers a great balance of performance vs cost and whether you are a sport rider, or a commute rider you need to pick the one that suits you. I can only speak for myself when I say that I'd rather risk a decent bike being stolen from outside the cafe than do a 100 mile ride on a low-end bike!

Yes, there is a law of diminishing returns and the difference between a £5,000 bike and a £10,000 bike may well be hard for a casual rider to spot (and even harder to justify!), but pretty much any cyclist will be able to appreciate the difference between a £300 Halfords bike and the Scott in this deal and I would say that few would choose to go back after having ridden the better bike.

Anyway, each to their own and all that.
Edited by: "daern" 21st Jun
basergorkobal20/06/2019 11:17

There is a difference. It's the extra cog in the cassette;)I agree that in …There is a difference. It's the extra cog in the cassette;)I agree that in terms of shifting quality there isn't much between 4700 and 5800.I'm talking in pure value terms I wouldn't get into 10sp at this price point. It's more economical to pay a bit extra and go 11sp. The initial outlay will be lower than trying to upgrade further down the line.Been there and done that.


Yes it's literally always cheaper to buy a better bike, rather than a cheaper one to upgrade. That's obvious - you've bought more parts.

His point is that upgrading this to 11 speed will barely be noticeable for most riders, so it's not 'more economical' to buy a more expensive bike, as they'd probably never upgrade this one.
hotukbuythingswedontneed25/06/2019 08:56

Yes it's literally always cheaper to buy a better bike, rather than a …Yes it's literally always cheaper to buy a better bike, rather than a cheaper one to upgrade. That's obvious - you've bought more parts.His point is that upgrading this to 11 speed will barely be noticeable for most riders, so it's not 'more economical' to buy a more expensive bike, as they'd probably never upgrade this one.


It's not economical to upgrade because of the number of components you have to replace to gain an extra cog. With that in mind it's better to go 11sp to begin with. Even if you don't think you need it. I don't agree that 11sp is a negligible upgrade. It does make a difference. One that an enthusiast cyclist will fully appreciate.
Its a a fairly expensive carbon bike so it's reasonable to expect whoever buys it will sooner want to upgrade the drivetrain than to replace the whole bike. A nice frameset like that is worth putting upgrades on.
But that's just my opinion.
bonzobanana20/06/2019 10:56

Does anyone know where these bikes are made. Scott are owned by a Korean …Does anyone know where these bikes are made. Scott are owned by a Korean company who makes most of their goods in Bangladesh and just wondered if this was a Bangladesh carbon frame which is the lowest in the pecking order of quality. I think it would be re-assuring to know if this older bike was made in Taiwan or mainland China which tend to be better quality. Might actually be better frames than their later models. So difficult to work out bike quality nowadays when most brands are just importers who buy from the far east and not knowing the actual factories they have bought from especially when they keep moving factories (whoever is cheaper at the time). Always worth checking the weight limits of the bike and how long the warranty is on the frame this can often indirectly reveal frame quality. It costs more money to make a stronger lighter frame with consistent manufacturing quality.


Wrong ! , Scott Sports are owned by a Swiss company.
Good value for money. There's little difference between Tiagra and 105
Biker2525/06/2019 23:45

Wrong ! , Scott Sports are owned by a Swiss company.Good value for money. …Wrong ! , Scott Sports are owned by a Swiss company.Good value for money. There's little difference between Tiagra and 105


Only takes seconds to do a google search. I'm pretty sure they have increased their ownership since then too.

bike-eu.com/hom…571
code SAVE50 makes it £799 but only small sizes left.
rodman14/07/2019 23:07

code SAVE50 makes it £799 but only small sizes left.


They have the 52cm is stock , would that fit me as I’m 5ft 11? Thanks , and now that code makes it £749!!
Edited by: "Scooby2520" 31st Jul
Scooby252031/07/2019 19:59

They have the 52cm is stock , would that fit me as I’m 5ft 11? Thanks , a …They have the 52cm is stock , would that fit me as I’m 5ft 11? Thanks , and now that code makes it £749!!


No. I'm the same height and have a 56cm. A 52cm would be way too small for you.
daern31/07/2019 21:34

No. I'm the same height and have a 56cm. A 52cm would be way too small for …No. I'm the same height and have a 56cm. A 52cm would be way too small for you.


Ok cheers for that
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