392°
EXPIRED
Screwfix 16Ltr Dehumidifier £99.99 (inc next day delivery)
Screwfix 16Ltr Dehumidifier £99.99 (inc next day delivery)

Screwfix 16Ltr Dehumidifier £99.99 (inc next day delivery)

Buy forBuy forBuy for£99.99
GETGet dealVisit site and get deal
Reduced from £149.99, good reviews (admittedly on site so take it as is) but previous deals on this model have garnered positive comments.

Credit where it is due I only bought this after spotting the 12 ltr deal (posted by ianpaul) which is £10 cheaper.

This model is 250w, has two fan speeds the slower speed reportedly quite quiet. AFAIK it is a compressor model.

46 Comments

This looks good, not that I really know what I'm looking for but reviews are great. Thanks for posting

Link to deal posted for 12 Litre model at £89.99:
Click Me

Any one know if this is dessicant or compressor?

great price

ordered one thanks

Ordered for collection, thanks.

Forgot to vote hot-just done it and pushed it over 100! Good deal

Edited by: "Flombard" 12th Jan 2015

Flombard

Any one know if this is dessicant or compressor?



Power consumption is the easiest way to tell. At 250w it will be compressor. Dessicant dehumidifiers are in the 750w range.

Ordered and heat added. We have condensation problems due to shower, drying clothes indoors, and steam iron. Reviews look good and I like dealing with Screwfix.

awastedyouth

Power consumption is the easiest way to tell. At 250w it will be … Power consumption is the easiest way to tell. At 250w it will be compressor. Dessicant dehumidifiers are in the 750w range.



that depends on the model and what function is used, some desiccant start at 250w. and can go utop650w-700w on full turbo mode (eg drying clothes), but that is not the mode used all the time.

link below for some more info re desiccant v compressor.
dehumidifiersuk.com/g/1…tml

Original Poster

Flombard

Forgot to vote hot-just done it and pushed it over 100! Wasn't it £89 … Forgot to vote hot-just done it and pushed it over 100! Wasn't it £89 earlier ?



The 12L version was £89, I'm not sure about this one.. last year this model dropped to £109 and I missed out on it then.

so which one would be better.. this one or the other screw fix link ???

Desiccant aren't as noisy and operate at lower temperatures than compressor ones. Apparently although they are higher wattage they are more efficient.
Edited by: "itsadeal" 12th Jan 2015

I bought an ecoair desiccant before christmas, its really effective, we certainly dont need it running all the time. We now place it in front of the clothes maiden and the clothes are dry in a few hours. If you offset the price saved from not using tumbler and the fact that dry air is easier to heat than damp air I reckon it cancels itself out.
The fact that desiccant work at low temps is also handy, our utility room is a single skin building which is colder than the rest of the house, Im not sure if a compressor type would work at all in there. We also had a damp loft, it dried it out completly in 12hrs.

Original Poster

I'm aware of the differences and suspect this is a compressor but for my needs a compressor is sufficient. It is mainly for the house, it will be positioned on the landing and my house is usually quite warm. On that basis the potential problems when comparing compressor to desiccant don't arise (noise, ambient temperature).

If you are going to use it in a cold place (garage or cold utility room in winter) or in your bedroom while you sleep then it may not be ideal.

As regards this and the 12L, I paid £10 extra for the extra power.. there are other differences between the two also.

Dessicant are dear to run and if you read up on reviews seem to break down a lot. I spent days reading hundreds of reviews and for cheaper running costs and reliability will stick to compressor models.

lianne21

Dessicant are dear to run and if you read up on reviews seem to break … Dessicant are dear to run and if you read up on reviews seem to break down a lot. I spent days reading hundreds of reviews and for cheaper running costs and reliability will stick to compressor models.


That's interesting because I read the exact opposite. Compressor types have many more moving parts and have issues with freezing, also at regular room temps (around 21 degrees) they are about half as effective as their stated extraction rates (you have to live in practically a green house to get compressor advertised rates!).
Plus a massive plus point to dessicant types is that they can be transported without having to wait for the refrigerant to settle - you're not meant to turn the power off for 30 minutes after use... and leave it to stand for 1 hour, blah blah.

I got appliancesdirect.co.uk/p/a…ier when it was on offer for around £100. In Laundry mode it uses about 290W, which is better then other compressor types and (IMO) looks much nicer

Original Poster

SpikePhoenix

That's interesting because I read the exact opposite. Compressor types … That's interesting because I read the exact opposite. Compressor types have many more moving parts and have issues with freezing, also at regular room temps (around 21 degrees) they are about half as effective as their stated extraction rates (you have to live in practically a green house to get compressor advertised rates!).Plus a massive plus point to dessicant types is that they can be transported without having to wait for the refrigerant to settle - you're not meant to turn the power off for 30 minutes after use... and leave it to stand for 1 hour, blah blah.I got http://www.appliancesdirect.co.uk/p/am-dd8l/amcor-amdd8l-dehumidifier when it was on offer for around £100. In Laundry mode it uses about 290W, which is better then other compressor types and (IMO) looks much nicer



It is all very subjective based entirely on the context of your use.. as I've said for my purposes, warm house with item located on the landing a compressor is ideal. The dessicant models do tend to have higher kwh during operation but can extract more water from the air, and also increase the ambient temperature so this can complicate a matter which at first glance seems a relatively simple comparison (you may not need a dessicant on for as long as a compressor for example). If you have heating provided by gas central heating then the extra heat from a dessicant model isn't necessarily going to benefit you (most likely you will see a higher cost relatively speaking in your energy bills due to higher relative costs of electricity). However if your damp problems are pretty bad such that you need 16 litres a day of moisture extracted a dessicant is probably more suitable. My damp problems come mainly from 4 people sleeping in one room.. baths/showers don't cause as much of a problem and neither does cooking (helped by extractor fans), yet the bedroom gets damp after occupancy and this is mainly around the windows.

For my purposes dessicant would be overkill, most likely a compressor this size is too but now I have the option of drying a small quantity of clothes without putting the dryer on.

BTW I used Quidco as the cashback seemed slightly higher for screwfix than TopCashback.

I've got this one. Used it for drying out a freshly laid concrete floor (after it had a few weeks to settle).
Was left on 24/7 for about 2-3 weeks, drawing out about 4 litres per day. Really impressed.

I have this model, its good, a bit loud at times, but it does the job!

Throw away your carpets instead

Edited by: "Lache" 12th Jan 2015

only pussys need dehumidifiers

red23

only pussys need dehumidifiers


I hate pussys, this is disgusting

Original Poster

Lache

Throw away your carpets instead



"Liked" just for the random nature of the comment.

Have this. Is compressor. Works well - would say approx 4 ltr day on landing at 21 degrees temp running 8am-8pm. Too noisy to run overnight, plus as heating off presumably less efficient (colder temp). Noise is mainly fan running. A 'hum' can come & go but usually cured by adjusting the water tray so think slight vibration the cause.

Heat from me - picked one up earlier from my local screwfix. Was pondering getting one just before Christmas and the good reviews on this persuaded me. It's busy working away as we speak, not too loud but don't think I could be doing with it in my bedroom during the night as the continuous hum would bug me. Might try on a low setting. Already collecting water

i have a meaco and it is brilliant quiet and great extraction though it depends what you want this for mines in my living room

ande1979

i have a meaco and it is brilliant quiet and great extraction though it … i have a meaco and it is brilliant quiet and great extraction though it depends what you want this for mines in my living room



I assume you mean the Meaco DDL8, which are pricey at £180, but work really well.
Occasionally these come up as refurbished models branded as Supra, with 12 month warranty, for £80.
From what I can tell they are actually being sold by Meaco.

red23

only pussys need dehumidifiers



Hmm. Not too sure about that. Moist would be my preference.

with my old carleton dh100 dehumidifier when the rh got to the desired level the whole unit shut off. on these the compressor shuts off but the fan still runs. any ideas if this is better or worse? I'm thinking it's probably slightly better because the air is always circulating but annoying because there is never peace and quiet like I got with my old unit.

Original Poster

phillsmit3

with my old carleton dh100 dehumidifier when the rh got to the desired … with my old carleton dh100 dehumidifier when the rh got to the desired level the whole unit shut off. on these the compressor shuts off but the fan still runs. any ideas if this is better or worse? I'm thinking it's probably slightly better because the air is always circulating but annoying because there is never peace and quiet like I got with my old unit.



Mine arrived today (technically yesterday) and has been running about 6 hours now and the kids said they'd be happy to have it in the bedroom as it was so quiet.

I would think it would need the fan on in order to test the humidity, so it knows when to come on again, if that makes sense?

What can this reduce the RH to generally? Bought a RH meter a while ago and see rooms RH are currently 55% to 70%.

May I just remind those who may already have a portable air conditioner unit to check if they have a "dry" button on it!

Whilst NOT a de-humidifier per-se, this button allows you to "assist" a room in terms of hauling SOME moisture out of the area & dump it in it's tank (check the rear of the machines drain hole) & if in doubt run it into a roasting tray / similar receptacle, (we use a roating tray for draining out our washing machine from dog blanket clogs, ash from the woodburner etc.

Some folk may find they can help with a damp room this way, not a true fix but to reduce the moisture content of a room is the aim, ..naturally don't use a gas heater as that is high moisture recirculation!

It dawned on me this morning to check mine, have had the unit on in a room our humidity was at 59% it is dropping so far to 50% in around 40 minutes of operation (I have portable temp & humidity / moisture displays in rooms.
(ours is a "challenge" Argos jobby which is A energy rated incidentally) ..cost us £30 new, nice to put it to some use in winter to draw some moisture out of room or two.

On dry it runs at low speed, puts dry air out (a bit like a regular fan) & slightly warmed air to the rear where the exhaust hose would normally sit.

Because i'm just some spod off t'internet I'd advise you to do your research, & read this E-how link as well! E-how "dry button" on an air conditioner unit

..

Great buy!!

Our aged DeLonghi Ariadry combi dehumidifier/heater unit had become excessively noisy so when it packed up a couple of days ago and I found this offer I decided to give it a try. It's much lighter and more compact than the DeLonghi plus far quieter in operation. The timer and humidity controls are useful and easy to set to the desired levels. The manual mentions remote control (RC) operation but no remote is supplied so I'm assuming the remote control is either an optional extra or the manual doubles for another unit which comes with the RC facility. In any event it seems to be a very nice machine and judging by how much water it's already removed in the last hour or so, it'll be perfect for our needs and won't keep us awake.
Edited by: "Slonik" 15th Jan 2015

Slonik

Great buy!!Our aged DeLonghi Ariadry combi dehumidifier/heater unit had … Great buy!!Our aged DeLonghi Ariadry combi dehumidifier/heater unit had become excessively noisy so when it packed up a couple of days ago and I found this offer I decided to give it a try. It's much lighter and more compact than the DeLonghi plus far quieter in operation. The timer and humidity controls are useful and easy to set to the desired levels. The manual mentions remote control (RC) operation but no remote is supplied so I'm assuming the remote control is either an optional extra or the manual doubles for another unit which comes with the RC facility. In any event it seems to be a very nice machine and judging by how much water it's already removed in the last hour or so, it'll be perfect for our needs and won't keep us awake.



Useful. Still on the fence here as lots or reviews are of the "good enough for me" type. Really want to know how this stacks up against other dehumidifiers. Only saw one on Screwfix that had a 'vs' theme and it didn't fair too well.

Original Poster

Meathotukdeals

Useful. Still on the fence here as lots or reviews are of the "good … Useful. Still on the fence here as lots or reviews are of the "good enough for me" type. Really want to know how this stacks up against other dehumidifiers. Only saw one on Screwfix that had a 'vs' theme and it didn't fair too well.



It's my first dehumidifier and the only thing I can compare it to is an air conditioner of which I own 2 different types and extractor fans. It's hardly surprising therefore that I think it is very quiet and extremely compact as they are my only reference. I honestly never thought it would work as well as it does tho'. After 12 hours of operation I decided to empty the tank, I stood there looking around thinking, "has this really been pulled out of the air?" It's so small that I brought it down stairs while cooking to save opening the windows and using the extractor (which is noisy compared to this), I can't imagine wanting to do that other than the cold months though.

Geokinkladze

[quote=Meathotukdeals] It's so small that I brought it down stairs while … [quote=Meathotukdeals] It's so small that I brought it down stairs while cooking to save opening the windows and using the extractor (which is noisy compared to this), I can't imagine wanting to do that other than the cold months though.



I'm using it for a similar purpose and also not had one before. Previous owners of our house ran a B&B and put in a commercial type extractor - you can hardly hear yourself think with that thing running even on the slowest speed. Also found it good for rooms with damp washing when it can't be hung outside. As to how this compares to others I read the Which? report which is from 2012 so a bit out of date (Screwfix one not reviewed) and the only ones they rated were at least £180 (a small 2L tank Meaco) to £300. Cheap ones they reviewed such actually cost more to run as they extract so little moisture per day, I'm sure this one is better than those. As I won't be using this year round I wasn't keen to spend more than £100.

Always, always crack open the windows when cooking, the steam / invisible moisture gets into the fabric of the building & plasterboard (ceilings, wall covers etc, sucks moisture up like heck! ..how plasterboard is allowed in bathrooms & kitchens I will never know, as they are storing up problems for the future.

If doing any form of renovation work consider using cement fibre boards then tile over them (join them with glass fibre tape to make a "half assed" tanking stystem (no, not a wet room) ..but will therefore be better for areas where water & water vapour are sloshed around alot).

..or you may find that you have to let stand, then move your portable de-humidifier around to the room above the kitchen.

Original Poster

MR GUS

..or you may find that you have to let stand, then move your portable … ..or you may find that you have to let stand, then move your portable de-humidifier around to the room above the kitchen.



Which would be the bathroom. Honestly with the windows open (and a sliding door in the dining room, it's an open plan kitchen) and an extractor fan on, the condensation was still there but it was hardly noticeable. Now with the windows and doors closed, no extractor fan on and just the dehumidifier on (in the dining room) there was no condensation at all, either in the kitchen, dining room or bathroom (the room above). To make matters worse the kitchen has those little sunken lights and I can see straight into the kitchen (admittedly through cracks) if I remove the floor tiles in the bathroom. So any moisture that wants to go up has it easy.

I understand those who want to "bolt down" on such things but this little device makes that final choice much more convenient.

Geokinkladze

Which would be the bathroom. Honestly with the windows open (and a … Which would be the bathroom. Honestly with the windows open (and a sliding door in the dining room, it's an open plan kitchen) and an extractor fan on, the condensation was still there but it was hardly noticeable. Now with the windows and doors closed, no extractor fan on and just the dehumidifier on (in the dining room) there was no condensation at all, either in the kitchen, dining room or bathroom (the room above). To make matters worse the kitchen has those little sunken lights and I can see straight into the kitchen (admittedly through cracks) if I remove the floor tiles in the bathroom. So any moisture that wants to go up has it easy.I understand those who want to "bolt down" on such things but this little device makes that final choice much more convenient.



Do you happen to know the range this one can get relative humidity down to? Was looking on another thread and item and that iirc had the ability to set to 40% RH. I know that is very dry for your average room but to me indicated the 'ability' of the unit. I'm principally thinking of this to dry laundry (but with added versatility of drying rooms/decreasing mould formation on windows etc) rather than getting a vented tumble dryer which we don't have much room for.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text