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Seagate BarraCuda Pro 10 TB 3.5 inch Internal Hard Drive (7200 RPM - 256 MB Cache - 5 year warranty) @ Amazon UK for £451.41
Seagate BarraCuda Pro 10 TB 3.5 inch Internal Hard Drive (7200 RPM - 256 MB Cache - 5 year warranty) @ Amazon UK for £451.41

Seagate BarraCuda Pro 10 TB 3.5 inch Internal Hard Drive (7200 RPM - 256 MB Cache - 5 year warranty) @ Amazon UK for £451.41

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10 TB oO

31 Comments

Blimey, that's crazy !

In before "will it fit xbox/PS4?"

That's a lot of porn to lose...

Original Poster

Or for those who prefer WD, here's their 10TB 'Gold' HDD:

amazon.co.uk/gp/…OLE

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81qW7lHMCTL._SL1500_.jpg

Sexy

10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller ones.

The 8TB version of this drive represents better value at £348.35 : amazon.co.uk/gp/…h=1

I use the word "value" lightly though as clearly we're not talking great value when compared to the cost of smaller capacity drives. Good for NAS / CCTV use provided everything is backed up I guess.

wow thats a big drive...perfect as a server/NAS drive but with my server that would be 240tb of unformatted space..WOW...and i thought my current £100 was a lot


Edited by: "jouster" 16th Nov 2016

will it fit ps2 slim?

Might as well post this here - recently ordered a few 8tb Seagate Ironwolf drives and waiting for them to get back in stock. Anyone bought these yet for RAID 5 or Synology HR and have any issues?

but, if it dies??

Like the look of the Barracuda Pro drives, five year warranty and the additional excitement that it uses helium!
Nearly bought the 6tb model last week but decided it was crazy and bought the Toshiba X300 instead (£150).

HasanG

will it fit ps2 slim?



Yup...

Just require the following:

Hammer
Chisel
Soldering Iron
Duct Tape

Guide for doing it is here:

youtube.com/wat…k28

Enjoy

how many platters and do they do smr on big drives still?

DAZZ2000

Yup...Just require the following:HammerChiselSoldering IronDuct TapeGuide … Yup...Just require the following:HammerChiselSoldering IronDuct TapeGuide for doing it is here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-smetnW-k28Enjoy


Followed instructions but ended up in WW3?

craigstephens

10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller … 10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller ones.



For even more points of failure?

craigstephens

10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller … 10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller ones.



​1. More drives = more chance of a failure
2. If doing RAID you should really use different models or at least different batches
3. RAID build times are astronomical
4. RAID is not a disaster recovery strategy & it is not a backup
5. RAID has been known to kill more drives during rebuilding as it thrashes the remaining older drives to rebuild the array
6. Done properly requires dedicated raid card
7. Lose raid controller unless you have another identical you lose the array & data

Mirroring is the only raid really worth bothering with in the home as if anything fails you whip the drive out stick it anywhere else & instant access. The only raid I'd bother with in the home is storage spaces which is actually quite good altho in places the performance isn't brilliant but that's often the same with raid 5/6.

Really the best attitude to have is backup your critical stuff then just enjoy the space & try not to worry

Better off deciding what data is worth backing up & keeping it offsite, cloud whatever & if a drive fails replace it copy data back.

Russonf

but, if it dies??


You restore from your backup(s).

Russonf

but, if it dies??



​Do you reckon they said that when the first 100mb hard drive was released?

There is always risk, hence why you have backups and redundancy.

K1LLER HORNET

For even more points of failure?



​No, for redundancy.

​Ive been setting up servers with raid arrays for 20 years and never had any of those scenarios happen.

Cold, it's only got 9.536 TB of actual usable storage space*



*said in jest, no need to get super technical and explain why.

Will it fit an Atari?

Jamie200

Will it fit an Atari?



ST or Woody ?

Russonf

but, if it dies??



Back it up to a spare brain .. apparently our brains can store 10TB :P

craigstephens

10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller … 10tb is a lot of stuff on one drive! Think id rather raid a few smaller ones.



How would that help? if a single hdd/ssd in raid fails you lose all the data and actually increases the likely hood of failure.

Cctv

Jamie200

Will it fit an Atari?



2600? You'd probably fit quite a few in it, yeah. Wouldn't work, and you'd have to remove the pesky electronics inside, but they'd fit I bet!

10tb is getting silly now, for 1 hard drive !!!!!!!

floppydesk

10tb is getting silly now, for 1 hard drive !!!!!!!



This has been being said since rotating drives first arrived that they hold too much data to afford to lose. Simply put if you need lots of capacity these sorts of drives are what you want. I've currently got about 15TB of data across various drives but that includes back ups of anything important. I don't build a 3TB disk of important data and just leave it on one drive, I mirror the important data as part of a back up strategy. Some of those drives having been picked up when your exact comment was being parroted about those drives being the peak of capacity.

At the end of the day the people who buy these sorts of drives are one of 2 types

1 - idiots who buy just one drive and risk the loss of all their data
2 - and the more likely camp of people who will use several of these to mirror important data or to expand their current capacity in a convenient manner while allowing for backups to still be mirrored.

eraldo

How would that help? if a single hdd/ssd in raid fails you lose all the … How would that help? if a single hdd/ssd in raid fails you lose all the data and actually increases the likely hood of failure.



I thought the whole raison d'etre of RAID was that you could lose a single drive and still retain data integrity (hence the "redundant" bit).
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