Seagate Expansion 2TB USB 3.0 Portable 2.5 inch External Hard Drive £50.00 @ Sainsbury's Instore (Tollgate) may be national
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Seagate Expansion 2TB USB 3.0 Portable 2.5 inch External Hard Drive £50.00 @ Sainsbury's Instore (Tollgate) may be national

28
Found 14th Oct 2015
Found five of these in Tollgate (Colchester) store but worth checking in your local if you are passing. There was space for them in the hard drive section but shelf was empty, I found them in the seasonal / special offers area of the store next to the Star Wars USB drives. I got one leaving four more on the shelf. Seems like a good deal to me, has a manufacture date of July 2015 and product code is STEA2000400 if it helps. Picture is of the drive with receipt.
Like I said worth checking if you are passing store in your area otherwise if you are local to Tollgate then worth grabbing one!

In store / offline deal only - See link for more info and specs
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Shame there not wd but since there seagate i wont touch them
copystuff

Shame there not wd but since there seagate i wont touch them


I have a couple of Seagate drives (one internal and one external) and have not had any problems but each to their own.
I got 3 portables from asda sale but took them back 2 had i/o error when using usb 3 and one didnt work at all.
It's gone down a tenner was 60 i got the 1tb for 35
Was £80 in my local not checked today
A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. (No offence copy stuff)

Western Digital drives fail more than any other. Fact. Sea hate make some of the best drives on the market. If you buy some end of line drives from a supermarket, don't be surprised if they have io issues as most supermarkets stock from non official seagate suppliers. Most banking servers use Seagate drives, as well as the later Apple Macs which don't have flash based memory.

Seagate every time. My experience? 22 years as an IT Consultant. Just saying.
Been after one of these for awhile good find have some heat
brettjameslive

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. (No offence copy stuff) Western … A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. (No offence copy stuff) Western Digital drives fail more than any other. Fact. Sea hate make some of the best drives on the market. If you buy some end of line drives from a supermarket, don't be surprised if they have io issues as most supermarkets stock from non official seagate suppliers. Most banking servers use Seagate drives, as well as the later Apple Macs which don't have flash based memory. Seagate every time. My experience? 22 years as an IT Consultant. Just saying.



I'll not quote the backblaze study but... Seagates made in china are shockingly bad with slightly too frequent DOA. The enterprise stuff is fine, a lot of the consumer drives (from Thailand fabs) are fine. The chinese fab is (rightly) giving them a very bad name.

Most banking servers/etc use seagate as they are cheap and raid 5/6 + backups covers them.
I saw one of these in Cwmbran store an hour ago at £50
copystuff

I got 3 portables from asda sale but took them back 2 had i/o error when … I got 3 portables from asda sale but took them back 2 had i/o error when using usb 3 and one didnt work at all.



You mean the petrol station?

If you've got issues with these it's probably your PC/laptop. I've never ever seen 3 drives fail like that one after the other and I've been using Seagate drives for 15+ years.
mercutio98uk

I'll not quote the backblaze study but... Seagates made in china are … I'll not quote the backblaze study but... Seagates made in china are shockingly bad with slightly too frequent DOA. The enterprise stuff is fine, a lot of the consumer drives (from Thailand fabs) are fine. The chinese fab is (rightly) giving them a very bad name.Most banking servers/etc use seagate as they are cheap and raid 5/6 + backups covers them.



I wouldn't be using RAID5 in a banking server unless it's got a tiny amount of storage (in today's money).
are these the ones that you can remove the drive and replace the internal ps4 drive with?
Check both of my local stores (Prescot Road and Rice Lane) 1TB is £50 2TB is £80

Argos have the 2TB for £60 and I think you get a £5 voucher for spending over £50
the__cat

I wouldn't be using RAID5 in a banking server unless it's got a tiny … I wouldn't be using RAID5 in a banking server unless it's got a tiny amount of storage (in today's money).



Hmmm, even when you get into enterprise level (e.g EMC) storage pools with LUNS carved from them, the underlying disks are still sat on RAID controllers with raid 5/6/whatever running the show.
Edited by: "mercutio98uk" 14th Oct 2015
They're only a tenner more online at Currys & Argos......OK so this deal is cheaper, but if you don't happen to have a Sainsburys nearby with stock, you'd burn that much in fuel chasing the geese.
Not voted either way.
mercutio98uk

Hmmm, even when you get into enterprise level (e.g EMC) storage pools … Hmmm, even when you get into enterprise level (e.g EMC) storage pools with LUNS carved from them, the underlying disks are still sat on RAID controllers with raid 5/6/whatever running the show.



I know that SANs, etc, will likely be using RAID, but any enterprise SAN in any of my DCs with more than a couple of TB of data certainly won't be running RAID5 on them now. If they are they'll be legacy and data will be migrated from them ASAP.

The purpose of RAID is largely to enable the ongoing access to data stored within the array in the event of a disk failure. In a RAID5 array you can suffer from a single disk failure while still maintaining access to the volume stored on it. If, however, you suffer from 2 drive failures simultaneously (or during a rebuild) your array is dead and so is all of the data on it. This means you have to restore a backup from external media after fixing the array. In my opinion any financial institution will regard 24/7/365 access to data as absolutely imperative, so risking having to restore an array's data from external media would be an absolute last resort in a DR scenario, for example. That would push them to use something other than RAID5.

During a rebuild of the failed drive ALL of the data (and parity info) in the remaining disks must be readable. If an unrecoverable read error occurs (even just a single one) the rebuild fails. Suffering a URE is a lot more likely in a RAID5 array (obviously proportional to the size of the drive) so it's just a no-no for today's arrays.
cmontgomeryburns

They're only a tenner more online at Currys & Argos......OK so this deal … They're only a tenner more online at Currys & Argos......OK so this deal is cheaper, but if you don't happen to have a Sainsburys nearby with stock, you'd burn that much in fuel chasing the geese.Not voted either way.



But for people who can get to a Sainsburys which stock these at this price, this is a deal, right??
the__cat

I know that SANs, etc, will likely be using RAID, but any enterprise SAN … I know that SANs, etc, will likely be using RAID, but any enterprise SAN in any of my DCs with more than a couple of TB of data certainly won't be running RAID5 on them now. If they are they'll be legacy and data will be migrated from them ASAP.The purpose of RAID is largely to enable the ongoing access to data stored within the array in the event of a disk failure. In a RAID5 array you can suffer from a single disk failure while still maintaining access to the volume stored on it. If, however, you suffer from 2 drive failures simultaneously (or during a rebuild) your array is dead and so is all of the data on it. This means you have to restore a backup from external media after fixing the array. In my opinion any financial institution will regard 24/7/365 access to data as absolutely imperative, so risking having to restore an array's data from external media would be an absolute last resort in a DR scenario, for example. That would push them to use something other than RAID5.During a rebuild of the failed drive ALL of the data (and parity info) in the remaining disks must be readable. If an unrecoverable read error occurs (even just a single one) the rebuild fails. Suffering a URE is a lot more likely in a RAID5 array (obviously proportional to the size of the drive) so it's just a no-no for today's arrays.



Are you suggesting that raid 6 should be standard or assuming that there's other form of witchcraft they all use now? Everything up to oracle exadata (which has about the highest IOPS of any storage system out there) is still (after several layers of extraction) sat on multiple raid 5/6 arrays. These will be using decent enterprise class SAS drives which was my point (that seagate's non consumer stuff is ok).

If we want to quote experience I've spent the last 9 years sat in the operations room of BT's northern command centre with about 70k servers under my care. I'm not willy waving, I just don't quite understand where you are coming from.

All this seems like posturing (which I've been trying to avoid). Seagates enterprise stuff is fine. It's consumer stuff is (frequently) junk.



Edited by: "mercutio98uk" 14th Oct 2015
Payed 79 for three of these nearly a year ago, still working no problems whatsoever and one is in my ps4. hot
mercutio98uk

Are you suggesting that raid 6 should be standard or assuming that … Are you suggesting that raid 6 should be standard or assuming that there's other form of witchcraft they all use now? Everything up to oracle exadata (which has about the highest IOPS of any storage system out there) is still (after several layers of extraction) sat on multiple raid 5/6 arrays. These will be using decent enterprise class SAS drives which was my point (that seagate's non consumer stuff is ok).If we want to quote experience I've spent the last 9 years sat in the operations room of BT's northern command centre with about 70k servers under my care. I'm not willy waving, I just don't quite understand where you are coming from. All this seems like posturing (which I've been trying to avoid). Seagates enterprise stuff is fine. It's consumer stuff is junk.



BT's command centre you say?

I'm not saying that RAID5 isn't used anywhere, just that with anything more than a couple of TB of data sitting on an array it's a catastrophe waiting to happen. That's where I'm coming from. RAID6 is probably a better option if the shoe fits. Maybe RAID50 would be a better option and I could understand if you were virtualizing your storage across SANs, for example. That's different to straight-forward RAID5 though.

I say this because I've seen it happen, more than once. I went to work at a TV production company who edited for several well-known TV stations. They lost a disk in an array and during the rebuild another drive died. It wasn't great having to watch the IT guys literally crying when they thought they'd lost all of their edits for some of the UK's best-known TV shows. Three days it took to recreate the array and put all of the data back. If they weren't running RAID5 they wouldn't have been in that situation; RAID6 would've probably saved them a lot of hassle.

IOPS don't really come into it here but I do agree somewhat that RAID5 would probably be better than RAID6 for write-intensive database operations. Reads, however, would be just the same in both RAID levels.

I'm not trying to make you sound like you're overblowing what you do, but looking after servers could mean anything from literally sitting staring at Smarts / Solarwinds to maintaining the hardware in the DC. I know lots of guys who say they manage so many thousands of servers when all they actually do is create DHCP scopes and add DNS entries.
jamieandthemagictorch

Payed 79 for three of these nearly a year ago, still working no problems … Payed 79 for three of these nearly a year ago, still working no problems whatsoever and one is in my ps4. hot



​same
Can these be used in PS4??
saw this in Newton Abbot yearly this week. thought it was a bargain
copystuff

I got 3 portables from asda sale but took them back 2 had i/o error when … I got 3 portables from asda sale but took them back 2 had i/o error when using usb 3 and one didnt work at all.



​dexix has a point though. I've had four Seagate drives and two WD drives, and the two WD drives have given me more issues than the Seagate Drives, which I've had longer than the WD drives. All external though, if that's a helpful comment for anyone?
Grabbed the last one on the shelf in Tewkesbury Road store. Much like OP, wasn't with the rest of them, I was about to walk out the store and it caught my eye on an aisle end! Labelled up at £60 but scanned through at £50 and used my gift card from BT to pay. Cheers!
Can confirm no stock in Birmingham Castle Vale and Birmingham Shirley, two in stock at Coventry A45/Fletchamstead Highway, but priced at £70 when asking for a price check at the electrical counter.
They are Samsung drives once you look inside the case, got one the other week and swapped it out on my PS4, no problems at all, put my old PS4 drive back in case and now have a 500gb USB to use
Up to £62.99

currys.co.uk/gbu…tml?srcid=3&cmpid=comp~Pricerunner
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