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Seagate Ironwolf 8TB 3.5 inch Internal Hard Drive - £228.99 Amazon
Seagate Ironwolf 8TB 3.5 inch Internal Hard Drive - £228.99 Amazon

Seagate Ironwolf 8TB 3.5 inch Internal Hard Drive - £228.99 Amazon

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Looks like a good price for an Ironwolf NAS hard drive - £28.62 per TB

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I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, there it is.
45 Comments

hot, is 8 the new 4

amazing price for a 8TB drive, especially when I remember my first HDD was 85MB and contained Windows 3.1

These large HDD's scare me, egg's in one basket spring's to mind for the majority of people buying them.

£450 to RAID is still an excellent price for an archive of this size though.

The too many eggs in one basket argument is so stupid when applied to hard disks. If you needed to store 8TB of data, you'd be equally stupid to buy 2 x 4TB disks without bothering with RAID *and* backups.

I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, there it is.

Nth

I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, … I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, there it is.


But where is the "I would never buy a Seagate drive" comment

Nth

I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, … I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, there it is.


Who needs 8TB when 640kB is all you will ever need.

wolf33055

But where is the "I would never buy a Seagate drive" comment


Right next to the my mate bought one and it failed in a ball of fire 3 seconds after install.
Whereas he has 3hundred thousand WD drives and they are fine.

What needs to happen is for these drives to be incorporated in external USB drives, that's the way I've almost always got my cheapest 4T drives.

Great deal, heat added. Cheapest these have ever been.
Edited by: "Mr.No" 21st Mar

Oneday77

Who needs 8TB when 640kB is all you will ever need.


Pretty sure that was in reference to RAM and not storage...

I would never buy a Seagate drive. Far better to go with Western Digital, I have three hundred thousand of these and have never seen a single failure.

Actually have no idea about Seagate these days, anyone got a view on these drives? Looks like this might be a good backup option....

Nth

I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, … I came here to see if there was an "eggs in one basket" comment and bam, there it is.



I highly recommend all eggs in one basket. I mean have you ever tried carrying two baskets round Asda it's just silly, I much prefer all eggs in one trolley

wolf33055

But where is the "I would never buy a Seagate drive" comment



I love the "grapevine" reputations products seem to gain, even when facts contradict reputation people still insist they are not wrong.

Computer products are harder to gauge as reliability stats are rarely published but take Cars for example. The majority of people purchase based upon what is perceived as quality and reliability, even when there are publicised facts to contradict their conclusion.

Buy what you want and be happy is my summary lol I've seen many many drives and Seagate are OEM for many manufacturers and are of similar reliability to most in my experience.

Get better at carrying eggs. If they're in more than one basket, you're assuming you're going to fail at some point, which in itself is enough. If you're thinking like that, then you've already failed, and all your eggs are doomed.

johnthehuman

Get better at carrying eggs. If they're in more than one basket, you're … Get better at carrying eggs. If they're in more than one basket, you're assuming you're going to fail at some point, which in itself is enough. If you're thinking like that, then you've already failed, and all your eggs are doomed.



I agree, RAID, backups etc won't help you if your house burns down due to the additional fire loading of the shed loads of computers you have running lol.

The valuable, irreplaceable stuff I have such as photographs, source code and documents is less than a terabyte which I back up at home and to the cloud, everything else is either hoarding, and never accessed or can be downloaded/streamed as required.

follow the 3-2-1 backup regime if you want to give yourself a strong probability of being able to recover from a data failure. windowsitpro.com/blo…nse

orangelemon

amazing price for a 8TB drive, especially when I remember my first HDD … amazing price for a 8TB drive, especially when I remember my first HDD was 85MB and contained Windows 3.1



8TB drive prices actually seem to have increased appreciably over the last year or so. I bought a Seagate Backup Plus 8TB External unit for £190 last May. Can't get one for anything close to that today - Amazon are asking £352!!

I guess there just isn't anything better that's come along in the consumer segment to force prices down ... 10TB drives are still Enterprise products.

OrribleHarry

I agree, RAID, backups etc won't help you if your house burns down due to … I agree, RAID, backups etc won't help you if your house burns down due to the additional fire loading of the shed loads of computers you have running lol. The valuable, irreplaceable stuff I have such as photographs, source code and documents is less than a terabyte which I back up at home and to the cloud, everything else is either hoarding, and never accessed or can be downloaded/streamed as required.



Agreed. However, I'd like to shout out for those like me with dreadful rural wired broadband. Mobile broadband can offer a way to equal the utility of a fast city ADSL or fibre connection - but it's not cheap per GB to set up and use a 500GB cloud in this system.

Slim2k

These large HDD's scare me, egg's in one basket spring's to mind for the … These large HDD's scare me, egg's in one basket spring's to mind for the majority of people buying them. £450 to RAID is still an excellent price for an archive of this size though.



The misuse/abuse of apostrophes scares me.

If I have all the drive bays in my server full up, is replacing my drives with bigger drives the only solution for a one server setup?

johnthehuman

Get better at carrying eggs. If they're in more than one basket, you're … Get better at carrying eggs. If they're in more than one basket, you're assuming you're going to fail at some point, which in itself is enough. If you're thinking like that, then you've already failed, and all your eggs are doomed.


Just make scrambled eggs - problem solved.

paul_merton

The too many eggs in one basket argument is so stupid when applied to … The too many eggs in one basket argument is so stupid when applied to hard disks. If you needed to store 8TB of data, you'd be equally stupid to buy 2 x 4TB disks without bothering with RAID *and* backups.



This. And also I'm intrigued to know what user generated and irreplaceable data consumes that amount of space (beyond SME upwards sized businesses). My mission critical company data uses less than 1GB and is stored across many locations.

I think I'd be right in saying that most data of this size is multimedia and that most of that is commercial films and music which can be replaced. Obviously if you're a fringe case (e.g. Graphic designer, freelance musician, etc.) then you'll have many backups and cost becomes less of a prime concern.

plewis00

This. And also I'm intrigued to know what user generated and … This. And also I'm intrigued to know what user generated and irreplaceable data consumes that amount of space (beyond SME upwards sized businesses). My mission critical company data uses less than 1GB and is stored across many locations.I think I'd be right in saying that most data of this size is multimedia and that most of that is commercial films and music which can be replaced. Obviously if you're a fringe case (e.g. Graphic designer, freelance musician, etc.) then you'll have many backups and cost becomes less of a prime concern.


Sure, most data is probably local copies of films and pictures - but why not keep a (legal) local copy, for ease of access or backup reasons?

You are also terribly unaware of:
- own pictures + movies (=> can easily go into 100's GBs)
- documents + emails alone take 10-20GB for me.
- my MRI scans etc from hospitals => >>1GB
- backups...

Remember to always complete a FULL format on new hard drives and not a QUICK format.
A quick format will not discover bad sectors and the last thing you want is to discover weeks/months later that it was damaged in transit!! (Hard drives are susceptible to shock damage)

I have 3 PCs at home and total number of nearly 10 HDDs - including 2.5" and 3.5", internal and external, different manufacturers - including Toshiba, Seagate, WD and Hitachi. x2 of them - x1 3.5" and x1 2.5" are made by Seagate and both of them failing. 2.5" 500GB one - barely used - is showing x8 bad sectors and the other one - 3.5" 2TB 24 bad sectors. All other ones are fine and perfectly "healthy".
Edited by: "don_darko" 21st Mar

JoeSpur

If I have all the drive bays in my server full up, is replacing my drives … If I have all the drive bays in my server full up, is replacing my drives with bigger drives the only solution for a one server setup?



Hi, it depends..... If there is physical room in the case additional SATA/power can be easily added otherwise rehouse server into larger case or use external HDD's

matdey

Pretty sure that was in reference to RAM and not storage...


Symantics, just like what have eggs got to do with seagates?
Edited by: "Oneday77" 21st Mar

So can I just clarify, this is neither a suitable storage location for eggs nor a basket?

GreatBallsofFire

8TB drive prices actually seem to have increased appreciably over the … 8TB drive prices actually seem to have increased appreciably over the last year or so. I bought a Seagate Backup Plus 8TB External unit for £190 last May. Can't get one for anything close to that today - Amazon are asking £352!!I guess there just isn't anything better that's come along in the consumer segment to force prices down ... 10TB drives are still Enterprise products.



You're comparing two different types of drives, the Seagate 8TB Backup Plis drive uses shingled magnetic recording which gives high capacity at a low cost but can have a serious impact on performance (hence why they originally badged them as 'archive drives' and now 'backup') - this sort of drive is still cheap:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Seagate-Backup-Desktop-External-Integrated/dp/B01IAD5ZC6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1490104504&sr=8-1&keywords=seagate+backup+plus+8tb

The more expensive 8TB drives are standard hard drives that don't use SMR which puts the price up considerably but performance is much better as well. The prices certainly aren't coming down but they're not shooting up either like it may appear.

John
Edited by: "Johnmcl7" 21st Mar

If you plan to use several of this with a NAS in your bedroom, good luck with sleeping hw4all.com/tes…tb/

Just to let people know that thieves/burglars are now targeting external HDDs and memory sticks. They then make contact and attempt to ransom them back to their owners who can have all kinds of personal & sentimental data on them.
It's not enough just to make a backup, you need to hide it, possibly off site.

Thoughtful

Just to let people know that thieves/burglars are now targeting external … Just to let people know that thieves/burglars are now targeting external HDDs and memory sticks. They then make contact and attempt to ransom them back to their owners who can have all kinds of personal & sentimental data on them.It's not enough just to make a backup, you need to hide it, possibly off site.



Linux encryption I use works a treat.

OrribleHarry

Linux encryption I use works a treat.


You've missed the point! They don't want to access your data, they want to ransom it. If you don't have a back up and all your family photos are on a drive, you can imagine how much most people would pay to get it back. The fact it's encrypted doesn't matter to the criminal, they have it and you don't !

plewis00

This. And also I'm intrigued to know what user generated and … This. And also I'm intrigued to know what user generated and irreplaceable data consumes that amount of space (beyond SME upwards sized businesses). My mission critical company data uses less than 1GB and is stored across many locations.I think I'd be right in saying that most data of this size is multimedia and that most of that is commercial films and music which can be replaced. Obviously if you're a fringe case (e.g. Graphic designer, freelance musician, etc.) then you'll have many backups and cost becomes less of a prime concern.



For me it's my own photos and videos, I shoot raw + jpg on my cameras and I have a variety of high quality video sources including action cameras (sometimes use multiple at a time for different views), a 4k drone plus mirrorless, bridge and compact 4k cameras. It's difficult with video to only capture what you need, I went through a phase of not recording much video due to the space it was taking up but I regret it now as it's great being able to go back to old video to relive experiences or make up a new compilation video. I use a pair of HGST 4TB drives which then leaves the problem of back ups, I added an Ironwolf 10tb to allow me to easily back up and give me scratch space for working with intermediate video which can be 100's of gigs in size.

All that aside, even if people have 8TB of commercial video while that's replaceable it's going to take a fair amount of time to replace.

John

Thoughtful

You've missed the point! They don't want to access your data, they want … You've missed the point! They don't want to access your data, they want to ransom it. If you don't have a back up and all your family photos are on a drive, you can imagine how much most people would pay to get it back. The fact it's encrypted doesn't matter to the criminal, they have it and you don't !



You don't get it do you? They don't have it either its inaccessible, you could laugh at their ransom demands and restore from your backup.

OrribleHarry

You don't get it do you? They don't have it either its inaccessible, you … You don't get it do you? They don't have it either its inaccessible, you could laugh at their ransom demands and restore from your backup.


And that is why you need a hidden backup. They bin the device if you won't pay. They're too thick / drugged up to be able to do anything with the contents.

Thoughtful

And that is why you need a hidden backup. They bin the device if you … And that is why you need a hidden backup. They bin the device if you won't pay. They're too thick / drugged up to be able to do anything with the contents.



That's my point, encryption prevents identification theft from documents etc. Back up prevents data loss, both go hand in hand.

Johnmcl7

For me it's my own photos and videos, I shoot raw + jpg on my cameras and … For me it's my own photos and videos, I shoot raw + jpg on my cameras and I have a variety of high quality video sources including action cameras (sometimes use multiple at a time for different views), a 4k drone plus mirrorless, bridge and compact 4k cameras. It's difficult with video to only capture what you need, I went through a phase of not recording much video due to the space it was taking up but I regret it now as it's great being able to go back to old video to relive experiences or make up a new compilation video. I use a pair of HGST 4TB drives which then leaves the problem of back ups, I added an Ironwolf 10tb to allow me to easily back up and give me scratch space for working with intermediate video which can be 100's of gigs in size.All that aside, even if people have 8TB of commercial video while that's replaceable it's going to take a fair amount of time to replace.John



Yes, but you're kind of one of those 'fringe cases' I was talking about. In the case of commercial film/video, I meant it will be available elsewhere, not lost forever (in the case of your personal footage) so expensive backup disks may be less important for them - I don't really know, I was just vocalising my thoughts!

plewis00

Yes, but you're kind of one of those 'fringe cases' I was talking about. … Yes, but you're kind of one of those 'fringe cases' I was talking about. In the case of commercial film/video, I meant it will be available elsewhere, not lost forever (in the case of your personal footage) so expensive backup disks may be less important for them - I don't really know, I was just vocalising my thoughts!



It's far from unusual for those into photography and video to use a lot of personal storage and while commercial files can be replaced, it's a lot of time and effort against the cost of a backup hard drive.

John
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