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SEASONS UPGRADES!!! Windows 7: Professional (OEM) Genuine & Authentic Microsoft Operating System £9.92 - then upgrade to Windows 10 for free, it'll never get bricked because it's legit (Opium Pulses) - or for 97p more get Windows 8.1 OEM (see link in
SEASONS UPGRADES!!! Windows 7: Professional (OEM) Genuine & Authentic Microsoft Operating System £9.92 - then upgrade to Windows 10 for free, it'll never get bricked because it's legit (Opium Pulses) - or for 97p more get Windows 8.1 OEM (see link in

SEASONS UPGRADES!!! Windows 7: Professional (OEM) Genuine & Authentic Microsoft Operating System £9.92 - then upgrade to Windows 10 for free, it'll never get bricked because it's legit (Opium Pulses) - or for 97p more get Windows 8.1 OEM (see link in

Buy forBuy forBuy for£9.92
GETGet dealVisit site and get deal
Windows 7: Professional (OEM) - A GENUINE OEM LICENSE KEY for WINDOWS 7 PROFESSIONAL.

Just in case it gets bricked by Microsoft, you can upgrade to Windows 10 for free using the assistive technologies freebie route. This generates a shiny new product key from Microsoft themselves and will never get bricked.

If Windows 7 runs out (low stock) - same applies to Windows 8.1 OEM which is a few pence more $13.45 (£10.89) opiumpulses.com/sto…nal

39 Comments

Original Poster

Free upgrade to Windows 10 - available to all W7 & W8 computers
microsoft.com/en-…ade?tduid=(82c864f573f58c53984c09dfdf3059da)(266696)(1018132)(1066434349)()

I'm still on xp lol will this work

foxyuk

I'm still on xp lol will this work



​yep it's a windows 7 install not an upgrade

You can easily upgrade 'any version' of 7 to generate a legit 10 key. Paying £9.92 to this lot won't make the end result any different. If you know it's a scam and the key will get blacklisted I'm baffled why you would post it and endorse it to others? #HotpiracytipsUK

The upgrade for windows 7 & 8 was pulled months back for normal users but the work around should still work but for how long no one know so if your buying this to use later be careful.

Edited by: "polly69" 20th Dec 2016

Original Poster

mehmeh

You can easily upgrade 'any version' of 7 to generate a legit 10 key. … You can easily upgrade 'any version' of 7 to generate a legit 10 key. Paying £9.92 to this lot won't make the end result any different. If you know it's a scam and the key will get blacklisted I'm baffled why you would post it and endorse it to others? #HotpiracytipsUK



That's the difference - this isn't a scam product. They get them when industry computers get recycled etc - the product keys are legit.

polly69

The upgrade for windows 7 & 8 was pulled months back for normal users but … The upgrade for windows 7 & 8 was pulled months back for normal users but the work around should still work but for how long no one know so if your buying this to use later be careful.



​Yeah but the criteria for the free win 10 upgrade is that you use assistive technology which is a lot of people (zoom, screen reading etc)

legally to use the old OEM key you have to physically keep/own the chassis or parts that came with the key.. unless you see the key on a system and they are storing the part and selling just the key or they send you the part you have no claim for a legitimate key.. they could just be using a good key gen and sending the keys..

I've seen windows 10 pro with 3000+ sales at £6 each.. no way do they have 3000 scrap computers with windows 10 licences. it's a key gen..

luvsadealdealdeal

That's the difference - this isn't a scam product. They get them when … That's the difference - this isn't a scam product. They get them when industry computers get recycled etc - the product keys are legit.


If that was the case then people wouldn't need to upgrade to 10 "Just in case it gets bricked by Microsoft" would they?! #Sigh

I bought a W7 code from this site a few months ago and finally got round to upgrading my dad's PC from XP to Win7 a few weeks ago. It wouldn't activate online, so I tried via the suggested phone method and that failed due to it not being a valid code Once bitten twice shy for me I'm afraid.

luvsadealdealdeal

That's the difference - this isn't a scam product. They get them when … That's the difference - this isn't a scam product. They get them when industry computers get recycled etc - the product keys are legit.


Not in terms of satisfying the licensing terms, even if they work. The point is that you could do this with 'any version' that doesn't satisfy the licensing terms. Just because you're paying a third party for a license-infringing key doesn't make the upgrade more legitimate than if you did it from a pirated Windows 7.

OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the terms of the license

I got a genuine windows 7 key a week ago for £7.50 online

Original Poster

fmo

OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the … OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the terms of the license



Except that got thrown out by the European courts

Another day, another thread selling non-legit keys.... Might as well just pirate it instead if you're not buying a proper license. Save yourself a few quid and stop someone else getting rich off selling dodgy keys!

Original Poster

Ashe

Not in terms of satisfying the licensing terms, even if they work. The … Not in terms of satisfying the licensing terms, even if they work. The point is that you could do this with 'any version' that doesn't satisfy the licensing terms. Just because you're paying a third party for a license-infringing key doesn't make the upgrade more legitimate than if you did it from a pirated Windows 7.



The European courts established that was an unfair & therefore unenforceable element of the licensing T&Cs

ARghhh matey, ahoy. not this dodgy old deal again, surely this counts as spam as it's posted all the time.....except that it won't for some completely unrelated financial gain reward mechanism that is in place.

Edited by: "spannerzone" 20th Dec 2016

Original Poster

spannerzone

ARghhh matey, ahoy. not this dodgy old deal again, surely this counts as … ARghhh matey, ahoy. not this dodgy old deal again, surely this counts as spam as it's posted all the time.....except that it won't for some completely unrelated financial gain reward mechanism that is in place.



aye aye Spanner - thought you'd be along soon as you have a real nose for a good deal

fmo

OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the … OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the terms of the license

luvsadealdealdeal

Except that got thrown out by the European courts


WHEN? You need to stop deceiving everyone here and quote the specific case!

Original Poster

fmo

OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the … OEM licenses are not transferable to other machines, it's part of the terms of the license

luvsadealdealdeal

Except that got thrown out by the European courts



Selling OEM Windows copies – you can do it in Europe
According to this reading of the law, anyway
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8 May 2002 at 13:22, Team Register
Our recent piece on Microsoft's interesting claim (now withdrawn*) that it's a legal requirement that a preinstalled operating system system remain with a machine for the life of the machine prompted a contribution on a related matter from Andrew Katz of Moorcrofts Corporate Law, who argues in some detail that under European law Microsoft has no right to stop you selling on any copy of Windows, including preinstalled versions.

This is not what the licence agreement says, of course, and it's probably not what Microsoft's lawyers are going to say when you meet them in court. So if anybody wants to be a test case, please note Andrew's disclaimer towards the end of this piece. Now, over to Andrew.

In Europe, subsequent sale of computer programs is governed by the 1991 Computer Software Directive, the relevant text of which is:

The first sale in the Community of a copy of a program by the rightholder or with his consent shall exhaust the distribution right within the Community of that copy, with the exception of the right to control further rental of the program or a copy thereof. (Article 4 (c))

In English, this means that once Microsoft has sold a copy of Windows anywhere in the European Union (actually the European Economic Area, but let's not quibble over another country or three), it has no control over how that copy is subsequently distributed (with an exception only for rental). Reading this, barrack room lawyers will be saying "Stop! Microsoft doesn't sell its software - it licenses it - so these rules don't apply". ****. The only way of reading this provision consistent with the "purposive" approach of interpreting European law is that "sale ... of a copy ... by the rightholder or with his consent" means "sale of a licensed copy". "Exhaust the distribution right of that copy" means "Prevent Microsoft having any control on how that copy is transferred from user to user". On the one hand, Microsoft can argue that since you bought the copy of Windows on a hard disk inside the computer when you bought it, then you can transfer that copy, on that hard disk. So there is an argument that that copy of Windows is linked to that hard disk. But it's not a very good argument.

Remember I mentioned "purposive" above.

"Purposive" means that the directive must be interpreted in a way which is consistent with its purpose. And the purpose of that part of the directive is to place Microsoft on a level playing field with the manufacturers of goods, like cars and fridges and tomatoes. No doubt, Ford would love it if it was allowed to "sell" Mondeos in circumstances where it could prevent the buyer from selling them on the second-hand market. But it can't for two reasons. (1) there is an established and flourishing second-hand market and no-one would buy a car they knew they couldn't sell second-hand; and (2) there are long established rules (in English law in any event) surrounding "unreasonable restraints of trade".

Any attempt by Ford to impose such an obligation on a purchaser would be struck down by the courts as an unreasonable restraint of trade. Why should Microsoft have an advantage that Ford does not have? Note that the advantage is to the supplier itself, not to the market or the economy as a whole. Hence the passing of this part of the directive, which (among other things) is intended to bring about the establishment of a legitimate second hand market for software (something which for other reasons - unfathomable to me - has never actually happened). Incidentally, I have in my possession a Microsoft mouse which is also allegedly not to be resold except with other hardware. I have never come across a more blatant and unreasonable restraint of trade.

Therefore, limiting the sale-on of the Windows software with the hard disk it came on is clearly (to me) an attempt by Microsoft to exercise the "distribution right" of that copy of the software after that right has been exhausted, and is unenforceable. I can argue this on and on. Clearly, if when you buy a machine with an OEM copy of Windows on CD (as in the good old days) there is no argument, and the copy on CD can be given away or sold on (provided you don't keep on using it as you are no longer an authorised user). However, you are fully entitled to take a backup (again under the directive). Which leads to the logical corollary (remember "purposive"?) that you must be allowed to restore that backup. If you choose to restore that backup onto another hard disk, then that restored version of the software must be "the copy". Or what if your copy of Windows is on a RAID setup, in which case there will be more than one copy of the software? The point is, in order to establish the correct scope of the directive, you must read "copy" in the correct context. Was the purpose of the directive to allow more than one person to benefit from a copy of Windows at a time? No it wasn't. Was is to allow a user to legitimately sell on a copy of Windows once he had finished with it: upgraded to Linux, say? Yes it was.

I've got to do the boring lawyer thing and say the foregoing is not advice: it's my own personal view, so if you publish this and people get hammered by Microsoft by trying to exercise the rights granted to them under E.U. law, I won't either be (1) surprised or (2) liable. But I'm always in the market for (legitimate) second-hand copies of software.

Original Poster

EU Court Says, Yes, You Can Resell Your Software, Even If The Software Company Says You Can't
from the good-for-them dept
You may remember that a couple years ago, an appeals court in the US ruled that, when dealing with software, as long as the provider calls what it sells "a license" rather than a "sale" it can take away your first sale rights. As you hopefully know, first sale rights are what let you resell goods that have copyright-covered material in them -- such as books -- without asking for permission from the copyright holder. However, for reasons that still don't make any sense, the 9th Circuit seems to think that as long as something is purely digital, first sale no longer applies.

The Supreme Court refused to hear the appeal, so while technically the ruling still only applies in the 9th Circuit, it's what most consider to be the state of the law in the US (there is always the possibility a different circuit court could disagree and it could go back to the Supreme Court -- and one could argue that some other rulings in the 9th Circuit already conflict -- but for now, the Autodesk case is widely considered the standard). There is, also, the upcoming ReDigi case, of which there's a decent profile in the Boston Globe -- but that's focused on music, and it's not entirely clear how that one will come out either.

Over in Europe, however, it appears that the European Court of Justice (who has been pushing out some relatively insightful rulings on copyright issues lately) seems to recognize just how ridiculous the 9th Circuit's view on first sale and software really is. In a new ruling, it has upheld the right of first sale on software, basically saying that you are buying a license and that license is resellable.

The specific case involved a company, UsedSoft, that was trying to create a market in reselling used software. Oracle sued, claiming that its license agreement specifically stated that it could not be resold. However, the court found that the right of first sale applied. In the court's language, it talks about copyright "exhaustion" which is the idea that once you've sold something you've "exhausted" your right to control it.
It makes no difference, in a situation such as that at issue in the main proceedings, whether the copy of the computer program was made available to the customer by the rightholder concerned by means of a download from the rightholder’s website or by means of a material medium such as a CD-ROM or DVD. Even if, in the latter case too, the rightholder formally separates the customer’s right to use the copy of the program supplied from the operation of transferring the copy of the program to the customer on a material medium, the operation of downloading from that medium a copy of the computer program and that of concluding a licence agreement remain inseparable from the point of view of the acquirer, for the reasons set out in paragraph 44 above. Since an acquirer who downloads a copy of the program concerned by means of a material medium such as a CD-ROM or DVD and concludes a licence agreement for that copy receives the right to use the copy for an unlimited period in return for payment of a fee, it must be considered that those two operations likewise involve, in the case of the making available of a copy of the computer program concerned by means of a material medium such as a CD-ROM or DVD, the transfer of the right of ownership of that copy.
There are some interesting side notes on this. First, the court also rules that if Oracle promised free maintenance updates to the original licensee, it must continue to provide those to whomever purchased the "used" software. However, it also puts a couple of limitations on this. The first one is somewhat obvious: the seller of the used license can no longer be using the software. Oracle argued that this would be hard to track, but the court rightly points out that this is the same issue that those who sell software on CD-ROMs and DVDs face, but they figure out how to survive:
As Oracle rightly observes, ascertaining whether such a copy has been made unusable may prove difficult. However, a copyright holder who distributes copies of a computer program on a material medium such as a CD-ROM or DVD is faced with the same problem, since it is only with great difficulty that he can make sure that the original acquirer has not made copies of the program which he will continue to use after selling his material medium. To solve that problem, it is permissible for the distributor – whether ‘classic’ or ‘digital’ – to make use of technical protective measures such as product keys.
Separately, however, the court ruled that you cannot divvy up the number of seats in a license and sell them individually. That is, if you buy a 100 seat license to some software, and are only using 50, you can't then sell just those other 50 seats. This ruling says that the first sale only applies to the entire license agreement, basically.

There is some disagreement as to how "big" an impact this ruling will have. To be honest, I'm not convinced that the overall impact will be that large, but I think it is a good thing that the court appears to recognize that you cannot contract away certain rights granted to you under copyright. Copyright holders have long tried to remove the limitations and exceptions of copyright law through contracts and "licenses." Recognizing that those limitations and exceptions really do exist is important, and it's good to see the EU Court of Justice release a clear ruling on that issue.

anonimousse

Yeah really clever luvstosteal ROFLMAO! I didn't ask for a copypasta of … Yeah really clever luvstosteal ROFLMAO! I didn't ask for a copypasta of untested piece of US legislation? You categorically claimed that a case got thrown out of EU courts. Please just quote or link to that specific case!!!


What's a "copypasta", and where can I get one? Sounds a lot more interesting then regular old windows and keys.

Crapweasel

What's a "copypasta", and where can I get one? Sounds a lot more … What's a "copypasta", and where can I get one? Sounds a lot more interesting then regular old windows and keys.

It is a term used to describe weasels who perform almost direct copy and paste of stale and irrelevant information to make it seem like it is current or applicable in order to sound intelligent i.e. the weasel in question is talking crap. HTH

Original Poster

anonimousse

It is a term used to describe weasels who perform almost direct copy and … It is a term used to describe weasels who perform almost direct copy and paste of stale and irrelevant information to make it seem like it is current or applicable in order to sound intelligent i.e. the weasel in question is talking crap. HTH



haha! who's the cool dude with the hot thread, you ferret?

So, would people prefer that the price of their shiny new equipment is around £70 more. This would be the case if Microsoft charged the same price for bundled Windows as they do for standalone copies. OEM Windows is cheaper because it's bundled with and bound to hardware. Microsoft's answer to this could just be to provide Windows at a flat price to all, which would not be a good thing. When you buy a PC or notebook with Windows already installed, the OEM probably paid around £25 for it (a saving they pass on to the consumer), if you were to buy Windows separately, you're looking at around £100.

luvsadealdealdeal

The European courts established that was an unfair & therefore … The European courts established that was an unfair & therefore unenforceable element of the licensing T&Cs

The example you quoted has nothing to do with licenses specifically tied to a machine. It's about being able to transfer the same rights of a license to somebody else. In simple terms, if I buy a new PC with OEM Windows, I am still not licensed to transfer it onto another computer I own.

As a practical example, I don't see businesses flocking to buy these 'legitimate' keys to save thousands in licensing costs...

Considering you can pick up a key for Window 10 for about £12 it seems like a lot of hassle to save £2.





foxyuk

I'm still on xp lol will this work



No, your creator will need to update you manually! If you have a PC still on XP I don't know!

Cyborg joke there!

Original Poster

Leonintelex

Considering you can pick up a key for Window 10 for about £12 it seems … Considering you can pick up a key for Window 10 for about £12 it seems like a lot of hassle to save £2.



your £12 W10 key will get bricked

bit of a technophobe so please help me out here I have a hp laptop with windows 8 upgraded to windows 10 which I hate with a passion I'm a windows 7 kind of girl. Can I have the windows 7 installed onto my laptop or not before I bin the dam thing really cant cope with this s*** windows 10 any longer please help someone god knows who the hell thinks windows 10 is an upgrade its horrendous

Original Poster

mommarto6

bit of a technophobe so please help me out here I have a hp laptop with … bit of a technophobe so please help me out here I have a hp laptop with windows 8 upgraded to windows 10 which I hate with a passion I'm a windows 7 kind of girl. Can I have the windows 7 installed onto my laptop or not before I bin the dam thing really cant cope with this s*** windows 10 any longer please help someone god knows who the hell thinks windows 10 is an upgrade its horrendous



just install Classic Shell in 5 mins & you're back to Windows 7 look & feel

Will site take PayPal? Don't want to gift my data and find out it doesn't

scouseware2

Will site take PayPal? Don't want to gift my data and find out it doesn't


Yes I bought w10 pro for £15 for my new build about 8 weeks ago, no problems whatsoever.

lugsy3

Yes I bought w10 pro for £15 for my new build about 8 weeks ago, no … Yes I bought w10 pro for £15 for my new build about 8 weeks ago, no problems whatsoever.


and where did this w10 pro key come from? I may want to test this site.

Good price

Voted HOT, HOT, HOT!

chtyrone2

and where did this w10 pro key come from? I may want to test this site.


I have no idea to be honest where they get them from but it activated ok.

Original Poster

lugsy3

I have no idea to be honest where they get them from but it activated ok.



they get them from 'retired' corporate PCs or where corporate buys 500 licences but has 100 spare etc

totally legit in EU

foxyuk

I'm still on xp lol will this work


don't do it , we're all enjoying using your computer

quidstretchy

don't do it , we're all enjoying using your computer



Please explain ?
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