Set of 3 LED Recessed Light Set £14.99 @ Lidl from 9th Jan (LED Bulbs Included)
276°Expired

Set of 3 LED Recessed Light Set £14.99 @ Lidl from 9th Jan (LED Bulbs Included)

£14.99LIDL Deals
27
Found 3rd Jan 2014
Great Deal for 3 LED Spots with Bulbs

- 3 individually swivel-mounted spotlights, each with 21 bright, energy-saving LEDs

- Connector clamps included

- Available in a shiny chrome or matt nickel effect
3 year manufacturer's warranty

27 Comments

IP65 rated?

IP65 would be this price each surely ?



Looks like GU10's ?

Not a fan of downlights, but heat added for the price.

As andynicol suggests, according to the manual (http://www.lidl-service.com/static/63491186/94040_EN_DA.pdf) these are 3W GU10 LED bulbs.

If the LED bulbs are any good, could be a bargain just to get the LED bulbs for use in other applications.

andynicol

Looks like GU10's ?Not a fan of downlights, but heat added for the price.


More likely MR16 as the bulb is held in by a spring clip.

scotty2

More likely MR16 as the bulb is held in by a spring clip.



Good spot, I hadn't noticed the spring clip which is normally a dead giveaway for MR16's, BUT manual states GU10's and there's no mention of a 12v transformer.....?
Edited by: "andynicol" 3rd Jan 2014

andynicol

Good spot, I hadn't noticed the spring clip which is normally a dead … Good spot, I hadn't noticed the spring clip which is normally a dead giveaway for MR16's, BUT manual states GU10's and there's no mention of a 12v transformer.....?



There are some GU10 fittings sold by the likes of Toolstation, that use a spring to hold a GU10 lamp in place, the twist fitting is simply attached to a couple of wires, strikes me as bloody dangerous, but clearly they must have been passed by whoever polices this sort of thing, otherwise they couldn't sell them.

Added to the cheapness of the fitting, they don't give the lumens output for the LEDs (3W doesn't define the amount of light, simply how much electricity it uses), which is a sure sign they're not state of art and possibly don't kick out the amount of light you'd hope.

mike

mbuckhurst

There are some GU10 fittings sold by the likes of Toolstation, that use a … There are some GU10 fittings sold by the likes of Toolstation, that use a spring to hold a GU10 lamp in place, the twist fitting is simply attached to a couple of wires, strikes me as bloody dangerous, but clearly they must have been passed by whoever polices this sort of thing, otherwise they couldn't sell them.Added to the cheapness of the fitting, they don't give the lumens output for the LEDs (3W doesn't define the amount of light, simply how much electricity it uses), which is a sure sign they're not state of art and possibly don't kick out the amount of light you'd hope.mike



The weight of a GU10 lampholder in my experience needs a bracket to hold it in place above the ceiling void, whereas the 12v MR16 is normally okay with the spring clip as its only holding the weight of the bulb and tails from the transformer (fed through a fire retardant hood) ?

I have never seen a GU10 held in place with a spring clip, (thats not to say they don't exist).





Edited by: "andynicol" 4th Jan 2014

andynicol

I have never seen a GU10 held in place with a spring clip, (thats not to … I have never seen a GU10 held in place with a spring clip, (thats not to say they don't exist).



Mine are. Wickes standard GU10 downlighters.
Edited by: "deeky" 4th Jan 2014

what wattage are these

also have plenty held in place by spring clips here. same fitting as their 12v brother just for gu10. b&q sell them for instance. they work exactly the same.

3w is not a lot as a light on it own. I found I need 4 or preferably 5w led gu10 ( home base sell some nice ones)

I've seen loads of GU10 down lighters with spring clips. I used to have some and a friend has just bought some cheap fittings with clips too.

please take note: if these fittings are not fire and acoustic rated then they are not suitable for downstairs applications with living spaces above! GU10 downlights with spring clips are common. LED lamps do not use transformers.

To add....if these are standard GU10 fittings and the lamps that come with them are good then it is a fair deal however if the GU10 lamps are useless and you have to replace then you are better off buying a cheap GU10 downlight from your local electrical wholesalers and buying lamps seperate, you would also then get the choice of colour, enclosure etc.

beanster666

please take note: if these fittings are not fire and acoustic rated then … please take note: if these fittings are not fire and acoustic rated then they are not suitable for downstairs applications with living spaces above! GU10 downlights with spring clips are common. LED lamps do not use transformers.



Acoustic rated? What does that mean?

beanster666

please take note: if these fittings are not fire and acoustic rated then … please take note: if these fittings are not fire and acoustic rated then they are not suitable for downstairs applications with living spaces above! GU10 downlights with spring clips are common. LED lamps do not use transformers.



MR16 LED lamps do. Although the transformer or driver is a lower wattage due to the lower wattage of the lamps. This is why if you use LED lamps with a halogen transformer they flash if they don't pull enough current.


Acoustic rated? What does that mean?



I'd imagine it means that the fittings have to be constructed (and installed) in such a way that they comply with any existing relevant sound insulation regulations and don't allow the transmission of sound into any adjacent properties/living accommodation.
Edited by: "Slonik" 4th Jan 2014

bensimmo

3w is not a lot as a light on it own. I found I need 4 or preferably 5w … 3w is not a lot as a light on it own. I found I need 4 or preferably 5w led gu10 ( home base sell some nice ones)



That's not a statement you can make, W does not equal light output, there are 3W LEDs capable of producing a lot of light, only problem, they're very expensive, the chips themselves probably cost close to the set of 3 lamps here. it's relatively safe to assume these are cheap SMD chips and therefore you're probably looking at 300-350 lumens (especially as it's not mentioned on the instructions), a halogen 50W GU10 is going to produce around 450 lumens.

Personally I prefer the more natural white of LED and find it easier to see under lower lighting than halogen/tungsten lights, but you do really have to have more fittings to achieve the same light output. I have some 1000+ lumen lamps bought direct from China which are the closest thing to filament replacements, but they're expensive and not very reliable. I've found the best way to use LEDs is either fit more downlights (kitchen, bathroom) or use E27 socket splitters allowing more than one cheaper LED to be used in a single fitting. Splitters also work for energy efficient light bulbs and cost very little.

mike

Would these be suitable in a kitchen and bathroom please? Would love some for each. Also, are they easy to fit yourself, or should an electrician do it? Any idea of fitting cost roughly?
Sorry for so many questions!

Natbag

Would these be suitable in a kitchen and bathroom please? Would love some … Would these be suitable in a kitchen and bathroom please? Would love some for each. Also, are they easy to fit yourself, or should an electrician do it? Any idea of fitting cost roughly?Sorry for so many questions!



*cough* Part P *cough*

andynicol

*cough* Part P *cough*



Oh of course, I totally forgot about that! *embarrassed face*
Thank you, I'l look into it first then, or buy some to put away for later.

andynicol

*cough* Part P *cough*



Not necessarily applicable - "minor work" is not covered by part p -

‘Minor work’ is electrical work that does not involve the addition of a new circuit, for
example adding new sockets or light switches to an existing circuit, or the replacement
of sockets, light switches and ceiling roses. This work does not have to be undertaken
by a registered electrician and you do not need to notify your local building control office.
However, ALL electrical work must comply with BS 7671, the wiring regulations.
Edited by: "tiberious" 4th Jan 2014

Does that differ in a bathroom ?

tiberious

Not necessarily applicable - "minor work" is not covered by part p … Not necessarily applicable - "minor work" is not covered by part p -‘Minor work’ is electrical work that does not involve the addition of a new circuit, for example adding new sockets or light switches to an existing circuit, or the replacement of sockets, light switches and ceiling roses. This work does not have to be undertaken by a registered electrician and you do not need to notify your local building control office. However, ALL electrical work must comply with BS 7671, the wiring regulations.



The question was not about adding a switch or replacing a ceiling rose. Work in Kitchens, bathrooms and "special locations" is covered as well as some low voltage lighting installations.
However very recently Part P was updated so some other work in kitchens is no longer notifiable.

Following last year's consultation into the Building Regulations, the … Following last year's consultation into the Building Regulations, the Government is making important changes to Part P, which will apply to work starting on or after 6 April 2013.The changes will apply in England only, since the Building Regulations responsibility has been devolved in Wales and the Welsh Government intends to maintain the current 2006 Edition of Part P of the Building Regulations until further notice.There will be two main changes to the new 2013 Edition of Part P:A reduction in the range of minor electrical installation works that are notifiable, and that do not require a new electrical circuit, (this minor work would however still need to comply with BS 7671 and the Building Regulations as may be applicable).A change in the use of a registered third party to certify notifiable work (however, the exact operational details are still under development for this change).Range of work notifiableUnder the new 2013 Edition of Part P, electrical work undertaken in kitchens (such as adding a new socket) or work outdoors (such as installing a new security light), electric floor heating, ELV lighting and central heating controls will no longer be notifiable unless a new circuit is required. This means less work will have to be notified by Part P registered competent person companies.The minor work that remains notifiable includes:installation of a new circuitreplacement of a consumer unitwork in a room containing a swimming pool or sauna heaterany addition or alteration to existing circuits in a 'special location'



eca.co.uk/tra…ns/



eca.co.uk/tra…ns/



Edited by: "Patr100" 5th Jan 2014

tiberious

Not necessarily applicable - "minor work" is not covered by part p … Not necessarily applicable - "minor work" is not covered by part p -‘Minor work’ is electrical work that does not involve the addition of a new circuit, for example adding new sockets or light switches to an existing circuit, or the replacement of sockets, light switches and ceiling roses. This work does not have to be undertaken by a registered electrician and you do not need to notify your local building control office. However, ALL electrical work must comply with BS 7671, the wiring regulations.



My house, I'll do the wiring myself even for larger jobs lol.
Building control for adding circuits?
Psscht, rules n regs gone mad tbh

Patr100

The question was not about adding a switch or replacing a ceiling rose. … The question was not about adding a switch or replacing a ceiling rose. Work in Kitchens, bathrooms and "special locations" is covered as well as some low voltage lighting installations.However very recently Part P was updated so some other work in kitchens is no longer notifiable.http://www.eca.co.uk/training-news-and-events/news/eca-circulars-member-news/technical/circular-41-2013-changes-to-part-p-of-the-building-regulations/http://www.eca.co.uk/training-news-and-events/news/eca-circulars-member-news/technical/circular-41-2013-changes-to-part-p-of-the-building-regulations/



I was hoping 'tiberious' replied to my question re bathrooms before I pointed him/her in that direction.

mbuckhurst

That's not a statement you can make, W does not equal light output, there … That's not a statement you can make, W does not equal light output, there are 3W LEDs capable of producing a lot of light, only problem, they're very expensive, the chips themselves probably cost close to the set of 3 lamps here. it's relatively safe to assume these are cheap SMD chips and therefore you're probably looking at 300-350 lumens (especially as it's not mentioned on the instructions), a halogen 50W GU10 is going to produce around 450 lumens.Personally I prefer the more natural white of LED and find it easier to see under lower lighting than halogen/tungsten lights, but you do really have to have more fittings to achieve the same light output. I have some 1000+ lumen lamps bought direct from China which are the closest thing to filament replacements, but they're expensive and not very reliable. I've found the best way to use LEDs is either fit more downlights (kitchen, bathroom) or use E27 socket splitters allowing more than one cheaper LED to be used in a single fitting. Splitters also work for energy efficient light bulbs and cost very little.mike



It is as I was referencing these lights here and homebase for comparison purposes.
EU regulation (I think) now have to have proper lumens ratings to bypass Watt confusion, not just a max capable rating as per a lot of Chinese imports. (I bought a few). That also just like in Halogen/Filament etc light output ignores beam angle
I used to grow the LED's via Epitaxy so have a little understanding of how they work.
The driver circuit also effects the output, but hey ho. these are cheap and cheerful lamps.

(I don't think the EU regulations are in force till sometime this year, but a lot of the larger companies have probably moved over.)
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