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Shell Helix HX8 ECT 5W-40 - 5Ltr £16.62 delivered using code @ Carparts4less
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Shell Helix HX8 ECT 5W-40 - 5Ltr £16.62 delivered using code @ Carparts4less

£16.62£21.0421%CarParts4Less Deals
20
Posted 18th Jan

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

5 litres of engine oil delivered for £16.62 - seems good to me

Use code MID21

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Shell Helix HX8 ECT uses advanced emissions-compatible technology that helps to keep diesel particulate filters clean to help maintain engine performance
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MrSprkle18/01/2020 17:09

You can it wont cause any damage, just 5-30w is a bit more premium.


the viscosity ratings have nothing to do with quality/premium.

The first figure is viscosity at cold (startup), the 2nd figure is viscosity at hot.

Oil quality & features (fully synthetic, extra 'qualities' like "titanium fancy protection" or whatever etc) all have a slight role to play too.

Lets's take your z4 case. Book asks for a 5w30.

Scenario 1: Really loud and tappy at startup? Try dropping to a 0w30. This means it's thinner at startup and can travel through your engine a bit quicker and possibly remove these impacts causing the noises.

Scenario 2:Tapp ALL the time? A slightly thicker oil could help this. a 10w 40 could travel slower to the tappets/cams etc, but would provide better protection when there, possibly reducing any noises you don't like (assuming they're not injector clicks etc.)
Then again, maybe sticking to the same viscosity rating but getting a better quality oil (or even trying a different brand with different technologies and base oils) would mean best of both worlds. The oil is just as thin as before, gets there just as fast on startup, but is a better protector due to its technologies.

Scenario 3: Do you like a good spirited drive? Get it pretty hot a lot of the time? Maybe you're modified and get much higher combustion temps than the car usually does? Consider getting a 5w40 instead. The '40' indicates that it's thicker at 'hot' than the 30. Thus providing better protection. This does, however, mean that the 'imaginary line' connecting the transition between viscosity at cold, to the viscosity at hot, is in a different place - and this line does not necessarily have to be straight either. I'd say 90% of the time though, having a slightly higher hot viscosity is a good thing, although there is this next scenario consider too..

Scenario 4: High mileage? As you run an engine, its oil passages, tolerances between parts and the surfaces within all these change. Some passages will get larger, so a thinner oil maybe doesn't have as good pressure to get round any more. Maybe a thicker oil offers better results there? Maybe some oils that 'add a layer of protection to your passages' ( ) actually take up some of the already-narrow passageways that the oil needs to get round, and hinder protection?

It's a bit of a minefield but the best practice is to listen to your car, learn a bit about what you're hearing and try out a slightly different oil if you think it might help. Obvsiouly don't stray TOO far from OEM specs. Don't chuck a 20w60 into a car wanting a 0w30, you'll have a bad time there... but making slight adjustments as your car and the way you drive it changes is a good thing to do. There's also local climates too. If you're clicking at startup in winter (during the first 5 seconds or so), then try a lower viscosity cold reading, this'll help. Most engine damage does happen at startup (for the average engine).

In short, oil quality is really good nowadays and most fully synthetics offer really good protection. Listen to your car and see what works. Some manufacturers have their own ratings/designs for oil companies to adhere to but there's a fair bit of proprietary 'bs' out there.

Don't go for rubbish brands though. A Triple QX oil at 5w30 will be pants compared to a Mobil 5w30.

Wow, essay, sorry!
20 Comments
Is this any good for a VW Golf Mk5?
crevicekid18/01/2020 16:01

Is this any good for a VW Golf Mk5?


Yes you can use it in all VAG cars
this is also LL04 compatible for BMW's. You won't find well branded cheaper for a beemer with a dpf.
Thanks Op.
But my BMW's take 5w30........
So cant use this.
j0nY9018/01/2020 17:01

Thanks Op.But my BMW's take 5w30........ So cant use this.


You can it wont cause any damage, just 5-30w is a bit more premium.
Heated OP
+65p Topcashback available & tracked straight away: Link

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Edited by: "Headingley_Lad" 18th Jan
MrSprkle18/01/2020 17:09

You can it wont cause any damage, just 5-30w is a bit more premium.



Its for a Z4 so maybe best with what the manufacture states. My other BMW can drink this as am not fussed lol
j0nY9018/01/2020 17:18

Its for a Z4 so maybe best with what the manufacture states. My other BMW …Its for a Z4 so maybe best with what the manufacture states. My other BMW can drink this as am not fussed lol


the 5-30 and 5-40 is the viscosity level the lower being the start up temp the higher being at the hotter end, so unless your runnign the car in dubai it wont make an difference even with a hot engine.
But if you want to follow the book i understand... esp in a premium engine.
Edited by: "MrSprkle" 18th Jan
MrSprkle18/01/2020 17:09

You can it wont cause any damage, just 5-30w is a bit more premium.


the viscosity ratings have nothing to do with quality/premium.

The first figure is viscosity at cold (startup), the 2nd figure is viscosity at hot.

Oil quality & features (fully synthetic, extra 'qualities' like "titanium fancy protection" or whatever etc) all have a slight role to play too.

Lets's take your z4 case. Book asks for a 5w30.

Scenario 1: Really loud and tappy at startup? Try dropping to a 0w30. This means it's thinner at startup and can travel through your engine a bit quicker and possibly remove these impacts causing the noises.

Scenario 2:Tapp ALL the time? A slightly thicker oil could help this. a 10w 40 could travel slower to the tappets/cams etc, but would provide better protection when there, possibly reducing any noises you don't like (assuming they're not injector clicks etc.)
Then again, maybe sticking to the same viscosity rating but getting a better quality oil (or even trying a different brand with different technologies and base oils) would mean best of both worlds. The oil is just as thin as before, gets there just as fast on startup, but is a better protector due to its technologies.

Scenario 3: Do you like a good spirited drive? Get it pretty hot a lot of the time? Maybe you're modified and get much higher combustion temps than the car usually does? Consider getting a 5w40 instead. The '40' indicates that it's thicker at 'hot' than the 30. Thus providing better protection. This does, however, mean that the 'imaginary line' connecting the transition between viscosity at cold, to the viscosity at hot, is in a different place - and this line does not necessarily have to be straight either. I'd say 90% of the time though, having a slightly higher hot viscosity is a good thing, although there is this next scenario consider too..

Scenario 4: High mileage? As you run an engine, its oil passages, tolerances between parts and the surfaces within all these change. Some passages will get larger, so a thinner oil maybe doesn't have as good pressure to get round any more. Maybe a thicker oil offers better results there? Maybe some oils that 'add a layer of protection to your passages' ( ) actually take up some of the already-narrow passageways that the oil needs to get round, and hinder protection?

It's a bit of a minefield but the best practice is to listen to your car, learn a bit about what you're hearing and try out a slightly different oil if you think it might help. Obvsiouly don't stray TOO far from OEM specs. Don't chuck a 20w60 into a car wanting a 0w30, you'll have a bad time there... but making slight adjustments as your car and the way you drive it changes is a good thing to do. There's also local climates too. If you're clicking at startup in winter (during the first 5 seconds or so), then try a lower viscosity cold reading, this'll help. Most engine damage does happen at startup (for the average engine).

In short, oil quality is really good nowadays and most fully synthetics offer really good protection. Listen to your car and see what works. Some manufacturers have their own ratings/designs for oil companies to adhere to but there's a fair bit of proprietary 'bs' out there.

Don't go for rubbish brands though. A Triple QX oil at 5w30 will be pants compared to a Mobil 5w30.

Wow, essay, sorry!
Tonk3h18/01/2020 18:01

the viscosity ratings have nothing to do with quality/premium.The first …the viscosity ratings have nothing to do with quality/premium.The first figure is viscosity at cold (startup), the 2nd figure is viscosity at hot.Oil quality & features (fully synthetic, extra 'qualities' like "titanium fancy protection" or whatever etc) all have a slight role to play too.Lets's take your z4 case. Book asks for a 5w30. Scenario 1: Really loud and tappy at startup? Try dropping to a 0w30. This means it's thinner at startup and can travel through your engine a bit quicker and possibly remove these impacts causing the noises.Scenario 2:Tapp ALL the time? A slightly thicker oil could help this. a 10w 40 could travel slower to the tappets/cams etc, but would provide better protection when there, possibly reducing any noises you don't like (assuming they're not injector clicks etc.)Then again, maybe sticking to the same viscosity rating but getting a better quality oil (or even trying a different brand with different technologies and base oils) would mean best of both worlds. The oil is just as thin as before, gets there just as fast on startup, but is a better protector due to its technologies.Scenario 3: Do you like a good spirited drive? Get it pretty hot a lot of the time? Maybe you're modified and get much higher combustion temps than the car usually does? Consider getting a 5w40 instead. The '40' indicates that it's thicker at 'hot' than the 30. Thus providing better protection. This does, however, mean that the 'imaginary line' connecting the transition between viscosity at cold, to the viscosity at hot, is in a different place - and this line does not necessarily have to be straight either. I'd say 90% of the time though, having a slightly higher hot viscosity is a good thing, although there is this next scenario consider too..Scenario 4: High mileage? As you run an engine, its oil passages, tolerances between parts and the surfaces within all these change. Some passages will get larger, so a thinner oil maybe doesn't have as good pressure to get round any more. Maybe a thicker oil offers better results there? Maybe some oils that 'add a layer of protection to your passages' ( ) actually take up some of the already-narrow passageways that the oil needs to get round, and hinder protection? It's a bit of a minefield but the best practice is to listen to your car, learn a bit about what you're hearing and try out a slightly different oil if you think it might help. Obvsiouly don't stray TOO far from OEM specs. Don't chuck a 20w60 into a car wanting a 0w30, you'll have a bad time there... but making slight adjustments as your car and the way you drive it changes is a good thing to do. There's also local climates too. If you're clicking at startup in winter (during the first 5 seconds or so), then try a lower viscosity cold reading, this'll help. Most engine damage does happen at startup (for the average engine). In short, oil quality is really good nowadays and most fully synthetics offer really good protection. Listen to your car and see what works. Some manufacturers have their own ratings/designs for oil companies to adhere to but there's a fair bit of proprietary 'bs' out there. Don't go for rubbish brands though. A Triple QX oil at 5w30 will be pants compared to a Mobil 5w30. Wow, essay, sorry!


TL;DR
Thanks OP got 2 for next year's service too
MrSprkle18/01/2020 18:04

TL;DR


haha okay - a 5w-40 will be fine, and perhaps even better than a 5w30 for a car that's asking for a 5w30
Try using code " MID21 " it works a little bit better.
merb078618/01/2020 16:03

Yes you can use it in all VAG cars


Does not state any VAG vw specifications such as vw 505 00 / 507 00
Thanks OP Ordered as service due
Is this suitable for an Audi A3 2013 1.6 tdi diesel please ?
AdnaanMohamed_19/01/2020 15:58

Comment deleted


Well considering you have been using oil that isn't specified for your car and have been fine. I'm guessing choosing one that is LL04 spec won't cause any harm!
The only things you might notice is a slight reduction in MPG (will only notice if you are working out tank by tank), revs drop off slightly slower. On the plus point it will probably quieten down the engine a little once it's at full temperature.
There's a feature on the website that lets you search for your vehicle, discount code works on everything anyway I think
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