Shimano Ultegra 11 speed groupset 55% off £509.99 @ CRC
217°Expired

Shimano Ultegra 11 speed groupset 55% off £509.99 @ CRC

31
Found 21st Mar 2016
Less than half price. Bunch of options still available. Some blurb:

"The Ultegra 6800 series is "pro-proven" as it is a direct trickle down from the Shimano Dura Ace groupset. It stands for state-of-the-art technology, proven in pro races, the technology used in the new Ultegra 6800 series with 11 speed, newly designed brakes, new chain treatment etc.

*Please Note: Supplied with inner Gear cables only and does not include brake cables.
Crankset:

With a unique four-arm spider and Hollowtech II construction putting strength just where its needed, the FC-6800 chainset sets new standards for stiffness and low weight.

Ultegra FC-6800 Crankset Standard 39/53 teeth
Crank Arm Length: 170mm or 172.5mm
New 4-arm design for same stiffness with lighter weight
Hollowtech II construction
Hollowglide chainrings
11-speed compatible
Same bolt circle diameter for compact and traditional double chainsets means that one crankarm fits all chainring sizes
Bolt circle diameter: 110mm
Chain line: 43,5mm
Incl. Hollowtech II Bottom Bracket SM-BBR60 BSA
Weight: 765g (with BB)

Dual Control Shifters Set STI Ultegra ST-6800:

With smaller, sleeker hoods, the 11-speed compatible ST-6800 STI units deliver improved ergonomics for better rider comfort and control, with reduced lever stroke and lighter action.

Tactile feedback to the rider that the gear shift has been completed
Light action, define click engagement Vivid index shifting
Short lever stroke response
Powerful and controllable braking system
Carbon brake lever
Weight: 425g (Set)

Ultegra Rear Derailleur RD-6800:

The 11-speed Ultegra rear derailleur has been redesigned for lighter operation with the help of new low-friction polymer-coated cables. Shifting effort is now more even across the range, with similar force required at both ends of the cassette.
Short Cage:

Intended Use: Road
Cassette Compatibility: CS-6800
Maximum Sprocket: 28T/12T
Minimum Sprocket: 23T/11T
Maximum Front Difference: 16T
Total Capacity: 33T
Derailleur Action: Top-Normal (Traditional)
Cage Length: Short
Weight: 195g

Long Cage:

Intended Use: Road
Cassette Compatibility: CS-6800
Maximum Sprocket: 32T/12T
Minimum Sprocket: 28T/11T
Maximum Front Difference: 22T
Total Capacity: 41T
Derailleur Action: Top-Normal (Traditional)
Cage Length: Long
Weight: 207g

Ultegra Front Derailleur FD-6800 Braze On:

With a revised actuation ratio in combination with the ST-6800 shifter and polymer-coated cables, the new Ultegra front derailleur delivers both a shorter stroke at the lever and reduced effort.

New designed pull arm for more direct and easy shifting
More equal shifting effort across the range
New support bolt for more stable contact to the frame
Chainstay angle: 61-66°
Max. chainring: 50-56 teeth
Chain line: 43.5mm
Mounting: Braze On
Weight: 89g

Ultegra Brake Set BR-6800:

Long, fast descents demand confidence. Ultegra brakes deliver, with a new symmetrical dual pivot design and twin bearings reducing pivot friction and improving efficiency and controllability.

New SLR EV Technology
10% more power than BR-6700
Smooth and light operation with increased modulation
Brake Pad Types: R55C4
Weight: 335g (Set)

Cassette:

Rider-tuned means Ultegra works the way you want it. The new 11-speed cassettes are available in a range of sizes including a wide-range 11-28 option - one cassette to use all year round. Smooth, fast shifting guaranteed.

Ultegra Cassette CS-6800 11-25
Ultegra Cassette CS-6800 11-28
Ultegra Cassette CS-6800 12-25

Ultegra 11-speed Chain CN-6800 116 Links:

The new symmetrical Ultegra 11-speed chain offers low weight and high durability.

ULTERGA redesigned SIL-TEC Chain for 11-Speed
Weight: 253g

Please note that this groupset does not come supplied with outer cables."

Edited to amend deal to new price and new section.
Community Updates

Groups

31 Comments
Cold, half the bike is missing....... in fact 99% of it isn't there
How is this 55% off? This can be picked up for £500 or less from most bicycle stores. £450 is not bad but if you can get option you want.
fozed78

Cold, half the bike is missing....... in fact 99% of it isn't there



99%
Tim Timmens

How is this 55% off?


The RRP is £999.99.
Tim Timmens

This can be picked up for £500 or less from most bicycle stores. £450 is n … This can be picked up for £500 or less from most bicycle stores. £450 is not bad but if you can get option you want.


Traditionally we calculate the discount percentage by looking at the RRP and then the sale price. Sale prices from competitors are never a consideration unless of course they are less than the sale price being posted... which they are not.
419 at winstanley
£450ish is the regular street price, and will vary with spec (Winstanley is compact only & w/11-28). Ribble is the same price as CRC with fulll cables, and Wiggle (who own/have bought CRC) are £429.

Where very you buy from, cashback is normally available from the normal places, and some bank accounts
Actually Jim that's the clearance price, not the regular street price. 3rd party sales history for amazon whilst not a brilliant comparison does show what the typical pricing history is.
uk.camelcamelcamel.com/SHI…wse

Also the arm length in the Winstanley deal and the cage lengths and cassette ration may put people off with regards to the Winstanley deal as the combinations are ones you'd have trouble shifting with most combinations requiring a bit of leg power, so weaker riders or those living in very hilly areas may not appreciate the choice available. Body shape is important for the remaining options as the standard dimension stuff is gone (standard being what could be used by long and short legged riders with some minor adjustments). The Wiggle deal seems better, offering more but most with short cages which does not allow for a larger cassette if the terrain calls for it. EG, riding in the mountains in Wales.

Evans has a comparable price, but the options are very limited. CRC seemed the best as there are more options available, if you're at this price point, you know what you're doing and know what you need and whilst not all options are currently available from CRC, the amount of variation in there means that compromise can be kept to a minimum.

Merlin at £469 with far more range that any of them are worth a look.
Not sure what camelcamel or clearance has to do with it, as no one mentioned Amazon before, as I said, the street price for 6800 is £450ish, and will vary with spec, this is what you can generally find it for at any time from one of the major bike part resellers, and has been since it came out.

I got 6800 a few weeks after it was released, and it was around the £450 then.

You won't find 6800 on any clearance till 2018 as it's replacement isn't due till then.

For the spec's available, for most riders, the short RD should work, as this will take upto a 11-28, and you only need a med cage for the 11-32, a 11-28 should work for most riders for almost anywhere in the UK ( I have been using a 11-26 in the Peaks and found it big enough, and I'm not the fittest rider). Generally, you won't have 6800 level on your first bike, and you should have some experience/fitness by the time you get a bike/upgrade to this spec.

If you really need to play around with the specs, would be looking at Ribble, as their individual prices are normally very close to full groupsets, and you can mix and match with what you need and don't (like the BB if yours is pressfit), and sub parts (i.e. the 5800 crank is pretty good, and a lot cheaper then the 6800)
jimc101

Not sure what camelcamel or clearance has to do with it, as no one … Not sure what camelcamel or clearance has to do with it, as no one mentioned Amazon before, as I said, the street price for 6800 is £450ish, and will vary with spec, this is what you can generally find it for at any time from one of the major bike part resellers, and has been since it came out.



Agreed, I got pretty excited when I saw the 50% off but as you say this is the normal selling price and has been for a while from the main component sellers (CRC, Wiggle, Merlin etc. not Amazon), £450 isn't a deal at all.

John
Wow, that is expensive. Is one more gear really worth paying the extra?
MrPuddington

Wow, that is expensive. Is one more gear really worth paying the extra?



Depends if youre stepping up from a lower end Groupset, I have the 9 speed 105 and i honestly considered upgrading to the 10speed but at the end of the day it wasnt like i needed it. However if i was riding a bike with a decent frame running a Shimano Sora groupset then this would be a nice upgrade if i wanted to get more out of the bike.

Boardman & Specialized are well known to give you a bike with an excellent frame but with a lower end groupset compared to quite a lot of competitors out there.

Best groupset in my opinion but this price has been relatively standard at most places for a long while now including Merlin and Wiggle. Admittedly they all raise them temporarily every now and then to then be able to claim a sale price on it again but even so.

Remember you get an extra 10% off at CRC when you use your monthly British Cycling membership code voucher
MrPuddington

Wow, that is expensive. Is one more gear really worth paying the extra?



If your happy with 10 speed/would need a new wheel, would be looking at Tiagra 4700, this is the latest version, and takes a lot of cues from 6800.

The hoods are exactly the same (as with 5800), and the design of the FD (which is the weak spot with 10 speed) has been redesigned to mimic 11 speed with a smoother/lighter shift. Street price for 4700 is £230-250ish
Edited by: "jimc101" 22nd Mar 2016
Like all enthusiast tech it's a law of diminishing returns: at the top end you pay a LOT more for a SMALL improvement. Ask yourself whether you are actually capable of realising the small potential benefits from this sort of top end stuff.
Besford

Like all enthusiast tech it's a law of diminishing returns: at the top … Like all enthusiast tech it's a law of diminishing returns: at the top end you pay a LOT more for a SMALL improvement. Ask yourself whether you are actually capable of realising the small potential benefits from this sort of top end stuff.


More applicable to Dura Ace really. Ultegra hits the sweet spot between price and performance imo. That said, the latest 105 is pretty damn impressive for the money
£449 and no pedals ... cold

Only kidding - heat !!!!

Although - I went for 105 last year, and I really doubt i could tell the difference with Ultegra ... the engine needs to work better rather than needing new kit!
Edited by: "Macdory" 22nd Mar 2016
It's been this price for months so not sure this is a "deal".
Besford

Like all enthusiast tech it's a law of diminishing returns: at the top … Like all enthusiast tech it's a law of diminishing returns: at the top end you pay a LOT more for a SMALL improvement. Ask yourself whether you are actually capable of realising the small potential benefits from this sort of top end stuff.



​im not sure I agree with this. ive got last years tiagra on my winter bike and ultegra di2 on my summer bike, and the difference between the bikes is like driving a Skoda then stepping into a Ferrari!
£450 is about normal for this, usually one of Merlin, wiggle, ribble etc have it at this price.

great groupset though so worth the money either way!
badger636

​im not sure I agree with this. ive got last years tiagra on my winter b … ​im not sure I agree with this. ive got last years tiagra on my winter bike and ultegra di2 on my summer bike, and the difference between the bikes is like driving a Skoda then stepping into a Ferrari!



A far bigger difference will likely be your winter tyres vs summer ones - depending what you run of course
jimc101

For the spec's available, for most riders, the short RD should work, as … For the spec's available, for most riders, the short RD should work, as this will take upto a 11-28, and you only need a med cage for the 11-32, a 11-28 should work for most riders for almost anywhere in the UK ( I have been using a 11-26 in the Peaks and found it big enough, and I'm not the fittest rider).


I'm a big fan of having more gear options particularly as it is kinder on your knees than grinding away in a harder gear. This is of course unless you live in the flatlands of East Anglia.

I'm one of the few with a 32 rear and 34 chainring. Seated climbs all the way (tbh Im also not strong enough to climb out of the saddle).
As a coach once said to me:
Spinners are winners. Crankers are....
Not.
Edited by: "jazid" 22nd Mar 2016
9.99 at home bargain
jazid

[quote=jimc101]I'm a big fan of having more gear options particularly as … [quote=jimc101]I'm a big fan of having more gear options particularly as it is kinder on your knees than grinding away in a harder gear. This is of course unless you live in the flatlands of East Anglia.I'm one of the few with a 32 rear and 34 chainring. Seated climbs all the way (tbh Im also not strong enough to climb out of the saddle).As a coach once said to me:Spinners are winners. Crankers are....Not.


Indeed. I live on a hill that has four access routes. 1: 1:4 climb. 2: 2.2mile cat 4 climb. 3: ride through an estate which will either see you robbed or will guarantee a puncture. 4: takes an hour to get to and involves multiple climbs but descends to my place, so an 11:32 with a torn meniscus and a pair of knees twice my age (I think they're my grandmother's) gearing options are pretty much essential. Also I feel lucky I live with such hills around.
Pimpin' out your little push bike, ey?!
Macdory

A far bigger difference will likely be your winter tyres vs summer ones - … A far bigger difference will likely be your winter tyres vs summer ones - depending what you run of course



​of course, as will a alloy to a carbon frame, we could be here all day listing the differences
MrPuddington

Wow, that is expensive. Is one more gear really worth paying the extra?



Have you used 6800. It's worth it
Well, typical hotukdeal style voting
jazid

I'm a big fan of having more gear options particularly as it is kinder on … I'm a big fan of having more gear options particularly as it is kinder on your knees than grinding away in a harder gear. This is of course unless you live in the flatlands of East Anglia.I'm one of the few with a 32 rear and 34 chainring. Seated climbs all the way (tbh Im also not strong enough to climb out of the saddle).As a coach once said to me:Spinners are winners. Crankers are....Not.



I have the same gearing and I'm a strong climber out of the saddle, I thought initially it was pointlessly low but generally sitting in the saddle and spinning up the cadence a bit is a more efficient way to climb on the long, super steep hills. Plus it's not like I'm losing anything by having the 32 gear,it's rare to spin out the 50x11 at the other end

John
trickytree1984

Have you used 6800. It's worth it


Indeed. Its not just the gear but the overall shifting quality and precision. I never had 10 speed but coming from 105 9 speed the shifting required on the 6800 levers is so much lighter and more positive. Only downside that Ive yet to experience is decreased chain durability.
Johnmcl7

I have the same gearing and I'm a strong climber out of the saddle, I … I have the same gearing and I'm a strong climber out of the saddle, I thought initially it was pointlessly low but generally sitting in the saddle and spinning up the cadence a bit is a more efficient way to climb on the long, super steep hills. Plus it's not like I'm losing anything by having the 32 gear,it's rare to spin out the 50x11 at the other endJohn


Agreed. There is only one tt where I spin out and could have done with a 52x11 but except for 5mins twice a year, the rest of the time 34x32 is lovely. Although a 11x30 cassette would have still sufficed but im not paying 200 quid for a sram cassette.

Edited by: "jazid" 26th Mar 2016
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text