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Simpkins Jewellers: Seiko Prospex Automatic Divers Watch SRPB49K1: £299 Delivered
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Simpkins Jewellers: Seiko Prospex Automatic Divers Watch SRPB49K1: £299 Delivered

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Posted 6th OctEdited by:"HappyShopper"
From the first divers watch released in 1965, Seiko has been exceeding expectations for divers with its innovative technology. A timepiece that guides you through the challenges in the deep blue.

The watch is designed and manufactured to withstand up to 200m going under the water, and is suitable for wearing while scuba diving.The crown has screw-down protection to prevent it from being pulled out by any accidental operation.


SPECIFICATIONS

DRIVING SYSTEM - Automatic
CASE - Stainless steel
BAND - Stainless steel
GLASS MATERIAL - Hardlex crystal
WATER RESISTANCE - 200m diver's
CASE DIAMETER - 43.8mm

FEATURES

  • Power reserve: 41 hours
  • 21,600 vibrations per hour
  • 23 jewels
  • Screw case back
  • Screw-down crown
  • Three fold clasp with secure lock, push button release with extender

Seiko product page: seikowatches.com/uk-…9k1
Review: youtube.com/wat…YTY


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To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex (Mineral). It is therefore not as scratch resistant as Sapphire. It is however less reflective and less susceptible to shattering.

Hopefully we got that out of the way early and can fast forward to users posting random images of their unrelated watches.
Edited by: "Baldricky" 6th Oct
Baldricky06/10/2019 11:56

To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex …To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex (Mineral). It is therefore not as scratch resistant as Sapphire. It is however less reflective and less susceptible to shattering. Hopefully we got that out of the way early and can fast forward to users posting random images of their unrelated watches.


I’m sure Lowry jewellers was selling this one at £179 just a year ago. John Lewis were selling the black one for £179 last November I think. This just doesn’t feel special enough for the price.
hotukdeal9206/10/2019 12:03

Is hardlex more scratch resistant than mineral?


Hardlex is the Seiko proprietary Mineral. Arguably better than standard mineral, some say comes in two grades. I own this watch and other Hardlex and have never had an issue. But I am good to my watches.
38 Comments
To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex (Mineral). It is therefore not as scratch resistant as Sapphire. It is however less reflective and less susceptible to shattering.

Hopefully we got that out of the way early and can fast forward to users posting random images of their unrelated watches.
Edited by: "Baldricky" 6th Oct
Baldricky06/10/2019 11:56

To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex …To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex (Mineral). It is therefore not as scratch resistant as Sapphire. It is however less reflective and less susceptible to shattering. Hopefully we got that out of the way.


I couldn't be bothered to pre-empt the "Cold. Hardlex" comments so thanks for saving my fingers.
Is hardlex more scratch resistant than mineral?
Baldricky06/10/2019 11:56

To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex …To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex (Mineral). It is therefore not as scratch resistant as Sapphire. It is however less reflective and less susceptible to shattering. Hopefully we got that out of the way early and can fast forward to users posting random images of their unrelated watches.


I’m sure Lowry jewellers was selling this one at £179 just a year ago. John Lewis were selling the black one for £179 last November I think. This just doesn’t feel special enough for the price.
hotukdeal9206/10/2019 12:03

Is hardlex more scratch resistant than mineral?


Hardlex is the Seiko proprietary Mineral. Arguably better than standard mineral, some say comes in two grades. I own this watch and other Hardlex and have never had an issue. But I am good to my watches.
Nice watch, in the personal roster.
Baldricky06/10/2019 11:56

To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex …To highlight a point in the original post, the Crystal is Hardlex (Mineral). It is therefore not as scratch resistant as Sapphire. It is however less reflective and less susceptible to shattering. Hopefully we got that out of the way early and can fast forward to users posting random images of their unrelated watches.



However, you can polish out a scratch in Hardlex!
hotukdeal9206/10/2019 12:03

Is hardlex more scratch resistant than mineral?


worse, and you can't polish away the scratches.


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Baldricky06/10/2019 12:04

Hardlex is the Seiko proprietary Mineral. Arguably better than standard …Hardlex is the Seiko proprietary Mineral. Arguably better than standard mineral, some say comes in two grades. I own this watch and other Hardlex and have never had an issue. But I am good to my watches.


Thanks mate
VSUKWizard06/10/2019 12:06

However, you can polish out a scratch in Hardlex!


With a great deal of difficulty to be honest. Which highlights the fact that it’s not easy to get scratches into a Hardlex Crystal.
Great price
tempt06/10/2019 12:06

worse, and you can't polish away the scratches.[Image]


On the plus side, it appears that you can play street football with Hardlex Crystals without them shattering.
tempt06/10/2019 12:06

worse, and you can't polish away the scratches.[Image]


So we have a material soft enough to be easily scratched, AND so hard that those scratches cannot be polished out?

Talk me through that logic?

I mean I get Acrylic, easily scratched and easily polished. I also get Sapphire, very difficult to scratch and extremely difficult to polish. But Hardlex, easily scratched and cannot be polished?

Help me understand?
Edited by: "Baldricky" 6th Oct
coldpop06/10/2019 12:04

I’m sure Lowry jewellers was selling this one at £179 just a year ago. Jo …I’m sure Lowry jewellers was selling this one at £179 just a year ago. John Lewis were selling the black one for £179 last November I think. This just doesn’t feel special enough for the price.


No brainer at that price.

What a shame no one posted them on here as a deal.
HappyShopper06/10/2019 12:33

No brainer at that price.What a shame no one posted them on here as a …No brainer at that price.What a shame no one posted them on here as a deal.


I think they did, it was last year though.
Baldricky06/10/2019 12:16

So we have a material soft enough to be easily scratched, AND so hard that …So we have a material soft enough to be easily scratched, AND so hard that those scratches cannot be polished out?Talk me through that logic?I mean I get Acrylic, easily scratched and easily polished. I also get Sapphire, very difficult to scratch and extremely difficult to polish. But Hardlex, easily scratched and cannot be polished?Help me understand?


Hardlex is not easily scratched, it’s just not a scratch resistant as sapphire. It’s safe to assume Seiko know their stuff since they’re one of the biggest watch manufacturers in the world. Of course, nobody is forcing you to buy one.
A month or so ago, I tried looking up ways to get scratches out of Hardlex (though you're talking about a guy, my partner, who has dropped phones down a toilet, into a glass of water, is very gung-ho/an adrenaline-junkie, so his watches suffer a similarly rough life) and didn't really come up with anything.

I think the only real conclusion I came to was "swap out the crystal".

On my wrist, I've never had any bother with Seikos, but my watches are obscured under a jacket/sleeve most of the time.

Edit: He's came out the shower now and says he reckons he wasn't that hard on the watch (just a basic Seiko Quartz dressy watch, but it has Hardlex). Not sure I believe him, though.
Edited by: "louiselouise" 6th Oct
louiselouise06/10/2019 12:42

A month or so ago, I tried looking up ways to get scratches out of Hardlex …A month or so ago, I tried looking up ways to get scratches out of Hardlex (though you're talking about a guy, my partner, who has dropped phones down a toilet, into a glass of water, is very gung-ho/an adrenaline-junkie, so his watches suffer a similarly rough life) and didn't really come up with anything.I think the only real conclusion I came to was "swap out the crystal".On my wrist, I've never had any bother with Seikos, but my watches are obscured under a jacket/sleeve most of the time.


Think the answer to that is simply G Shock.
coldpop06/10/2019 13:09

Think the answer to that is simply G Shock.



Yeah, he's not that keen on them. But just making the point if you're rough on your watches, Hardlex will suffer. I had it on my table for a few weeks trying to unscuff it/put a new strap on it, think he's taken it home or I'd take a photo.
louiselouise06/10/2019 13:14

Yeah, he's not that keen on them. But just making the point if you're …Yeah, he's not that keen on them. But just making the point if you're rough on your watches, Hardlex will suffer. I had it on my table for a few weeks trying to unscuff it/put a new strap on it, think he's taken it home or I'd take a photo.


From what you’ve said, they’re the only thing suitable for him. I can’t really see too much difference between certain Seiko and something like a G Steel. Apart from the G will withstand a war!
coldpop06/10/2019 13:16

From what you’ve said, they’re the only thing suitable for him. I can’t rea …From what you’ve said, they’re the only thing suitable for him. I can’t really see too much difference between certain Seiko and something like a G Steel. Apart from the G will withstand a war!



I'm not trying to argue/prove a point, just saying this is my experience. Yours may be different.
I still just don't get the economics of hardlex/mineral vs. sapphire. Everybody would seem to agree that sapphire is the better material. If you go on ebay and look for spare crystals, say for a Seiko 5, watchpartsusa will sell you a mineral (presumably, hardlex) crystal for a bit under £10, and a sapphire version will cost £20. Given that Seiko and any other watch manufacturers presumably buy crystals by the container load, I bet the real cost differential is way less than £10. In other words, a Seiko 5 which costs you £100 on amazon would cost £103 (my precise guesstimate) if it had a sapphire crystal. And the posted Seiko Prospex should cost £303 (or whatever) instead of £299. I bet most of us would be happy to pay the extra few quid to have the piece of mind of an unscratchable crystal on our watch.

The only reason that I can think of that would explain the fact that there are non-sapphire crystals other than on ultra-cheap watches has to do with "market segmentation". Cheap(er) watches come with mineral rather than sapphire so that you upgrade to more expensive watches (for which the profit margin is presumably much larger) in due course.
louiselouise06/10/2019 13:17

I'm not trying to argue/prove a point, just saying this is my experience. …I'm not trying to argue/prove a point, just saying this is my experience. Yours may be different.


I’m not disagreeing, just pointing out that the Gs are made specifically for what you’re describing, as where the Seiko you’re talking about are more for diving and less aggressive things.
Baldricky06/10/2019 12:10

On the plus side, it appears that you can play street football with …On the plus side, it appears that you can play street football with Hardlex Crystals without them shattering.


That must be hard play with your BCD and Flippers on.
Baldricky06/10/2019 12:16

So we have a material soft enough to be easily scratched, AND so hard that …So we have a material soft enough to be easily scratched, AND so hard that those scratches cannot be polished out?Talk me through that logic?I mean I get Acrylic, easily scratched and easily polished. I also get Sapphire, very difficult to scratch and extremely difficult to polish. But Hardlex, easily scratched and cannot be polished?Help me understand?


I would be more concerned about the cheap movements in these watches if I where you, trying to work out why they put an hardlex crystal on supposedly £400 watch, Seiko fit the 4R36 to their lower end watches and they are not the most accurate.
This seems quite plain when the STO is just £10 more and the PADI version £20 more.

Nice watch but I'd go for the others with such a little price difference.
hotukdeal9206/10/2019 12:03

Is hardlex more scratch resistant than mineral?


Hardlex is just Seiko's name for their own mineral crystals. They perform the same as any mineral crystal, with a slight variance in quality depending on price.
Yetiboy06/10/2019 14:54

This seems quite plain when the STO is just £10 more and the PADI version …This seems quite plain when the STO is just £10 more and the PADI version £20 more. Nice watch but I'd go for the others with such a little price difference.


Funnily enough, a wise man once told me that this watch would grow on me and was not the plain Jane it may appear to be. They were right, 100%.
How’s this for a recipe for disaster?
Hardlex and sitting a good bit proud.


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Edited by: "Baldricky" 6th Oct
louiselouise06/10/2019 12:42

A month or so ago, I tried looking up ways to get scratches out of Hardlex …A month or so ago, I tried looking up ways to get scratches out of Hardlex (though you're talking about a guy, my partner, who has dropped phones down a toilet, into a glass of water, is very gung-ho/an adrenaline-junkie, so his watches suffer a similarly rough life) and didn't really come up with anything.I think the only real conclusion I came to was "swap out the crystal".On my wrist, I've never had any bother with Seikos, but my watches are obscured under a jacket/sleeve most of the time.Edit: He's came out the shower now and says he reckons he wasn't that hard on the watch (just a basic Seiko Quartz dressy watch, but it has Hardlex). Not sure I believe him, though.


I've found Polywatch paste to be pretty effective for polishing out mineral glass scratches, can't say I've used it on a Seiko but some of the vintage watches I've restored have had a very hard life and the transformation is remarkable.

Just take time and patience.
SharkSandwich06/10/2019 13:19

I still just don't get the economics of hardlex/mineral vs. sapphire. …I still just don't get the economics of hardlex/mineral vs. sapphire. Everybody would seem to agree that sapphire is the better material. If you go on ebay and look for spare crystals, say for a Seiko 5, watchpartsusa will sell you a mineral (presumably, hardlex) crystal for a bit under £10, and a sapphire version will cost £20. Given that Seiko and any other watch manufacturers presumably buy crystals by the container load, I bet the real cost differential is way less than £10. In other words, a Seiko 5 which costs you £100 on amazon would cost £103 (my precise guesstimate) if it had a sapphire crystal. And the posted Seiko Prospex should cost £303 (or whatever) instead of £299. I bet most of us would be happy to pay the extra few quid to have the piece of mind of an unscratchable crystal on our watch.The only reason that I can think of that would explain the fact that there are non-sapphire crystals other than on ultra-cheap watches has to do with "market segmentation". Cheap(er) watches come with mineral rather than sapphire so that you upgrade to more expensive watches (for which the profit margin is presumably much larger) in due course.


Cost of dual AR coating on sapphire is a lot. Most sapphire has poor AR and most often single. If you want the dial to pop on a relatively budget watch then mineral is your friend.
coldpop06/10/2019 12:36

I think they did, it was last year though.


Do you have a link - I couldn't find it.
HappyShopper06/10/2019 20:10

Do you have a link - I couldn't find it.


No sorry, it was last November I think, but I don’t have a link. It won’t be that price now after all this time anyway.
edgeone06/10/2019 19:38

I've found Polywatch paste to be pretty effective for polishing out …I've found Polywatch paste to be pretty effective for polishing out mineral glass scratches, can't say I've used it on a Seiko but some of the vintage watches I've restored have had a very hard life and the transformation is remarkable.Just take time and patience.



I looked it up on various forums a few weeks ago (example here) but it was suggested Polywatch only really works with acrylic.
louiselouise06/10/2019 20:50

I looked it up on various forums a few weeks ago (example here) but it was …I looked it up on various forums a few weeks ago (example here) but it was suggested Polywatch only really works with acrylic.


You're right. It is excellent on acrylic, as you say. A little patience is required though.
louiselouise06/10/2019 20:50

I looked it up on various forums a few weeks ago (example here) but it was …I looked it up on various forums a few weeks ago (example here) but it was suggested Polywatch only really works with acrylic.


In my experience it is brilliant on acrylic and you get results very quickly. On mineral it will take a long time (hours) and you have to use a lot of elbow grease - some take longer than other and I've never done a Seiko.
I love this watch and think it 's a great deal. Do you think John Lewis would price match?
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