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skoda yeti auto 1.2 tsi personal lease deal. £130/m @ fleetprices
skoda yeti auto 1.2 tsi personal lease deal. £130/m @ fleetprices

skoda yeti auto 1.2 tsi personal lease deal. £130/m @ fleetprices

Buy forBuy forBuy for£130
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Personal contract hire

£130.03 incl VAT monthly rental

£390.10 incl VAT initial rental

Contract term 24 months

Rental profile 3 + 23

Annual mileage 8000

Processing fee £240.00

Finance doc fee £0.00

Production status Current model

Warranty included yes

140 Comments

Seems a very good price, odd that they'd put a DSG gearbox in a car that isnt even vaguely sporty - but I think you can also use in the same way as standard automatic?

Great price, good find OP.

Car is a bit marmite, but you can't find fault with less than £400 down and £130 a month for a new car.

Good find OP you'll probably need to put up the total price before people start kicking off and throwing a fit. I think it works out at £3620.79 for the 2 year cost which is a very fair price and works out at just over £150 per month all in. With the warranty, no road tax and cheap insurance that's some pretty cheap motoring.

Great find. Heat.

About £5 cheaper a month, so, yep, better.

checkcanopy

Good find OP you'll probably need to put up the total price before people … Good find OP you'll probably need to put up the total price before people start kicking off and throwing a fit. I think it works out at £3620.79 for the 2 year cost which is a very fair price and works out at just over £150 per month all in. With the warranty, no road tax and cheap insurance that's some pretty cheap motoring.



It's not just the overall price that needs listing....it's the REAL monthly price.

As you say, £130 per month is not correct...

About £151pm by my (admittedly dodgy) maths.

I got one of these from a previous deal - great car. Forget the DSG and just use it as a normal auto. Getting just under 40mpg on my stop start commute - haven't done a longer journey yet.

DAB isn't standard but only adds about £2pm. The voice recognition system and Android / Apple car stuff (so your phone satnav appears on the screen) doesn't come as standard. It needs an activation code which you have to pay for but good luck trying to get it from a dealer... people only seem to be able to get it unlocked if they specify it as an option at initial lease / purchase.

Oh, and the pic is of the wrong model.

M_z

Seems a very good price, odd that they'd put a DSG gearbox in a car that … Seems a very good price, odd that they'd put a DSG gearbox in a car that isnt even vaguely sporty - but I think you can also use in the same way as standard automatic?



DSG is electronically controlled so it makes sense really, They can easily adjust gear ratios etc..

They do same thing with engines, Like the 1.9tdi used to come in various power options i,e 90bhp, 115bhp, 130bhp etc.. Everything is the same but the engine is mapped differently, Sometimes in the higher bhp models they use a different turbo but a majority are the same.

All about mass production etc.. DSG is getting more common across the VAG group.

Wow that's a super deal. 150 a month to drive a brand new jeep-ish car for 2 years.
Wish I could buy but not the right time.

Heat Heat Heat!!!

I have had a yeti for a few months and love it. different model from this though. I have the non dsg 1.4tsi.

hcc27

Wow that's a super deal. 150 a month to drive a brand new jeep-ish car … Wow that's a super deal. 150 a month to drive a brand new jeep-ish car for 2 years.Wish I could buy but not the right time. Heat Heat Heat!!!



It isn't particularly "Jeep-ish" as you put it - they look more like a van!

Nice find OP.
I am only three months into a two year lease but would snap this up if the time was right.
Currently driving a DSG, not sure I would want to go back to a manual now.

Also, my previous car was a Yeti and would definitely recommend one, brilliant car.​

blackpoolfc

Or is this a better deal? … Or is this a better deal? https://www.centralukvehicleleasing.co.uk/vehicle/choose_your_lease/74883/skoda/yeti/12_tsi_110_monte_carlo_5dr_dsg.html



I wouldn't say that's a better deal .. they are different cars??

sorry to go off topic, can someone please advice if the insurance is lower for new cars?

meem

sorry to go off topic, can someone please advice if the insurance is … sorry to go off topic, can someone please advice if the insurance is lower for new cars?


I think it is yeah, as security is better on them compared to older cars.
Obs tax is cheaper .. but I think its free on most of these deals anyway?

blackpoolfc

Or is this a better deal? … Or is this a better deal? https://www.centralukvehicleleasing.co.uk/vehicle/choose_your_lease/74883/skoda/yeti/12_tsi_110_monte_carlo_5dr_dsg.html



Works out at about £1 more a month overall, but it has a higher deposit so I guess most people would prefer the OP's deal.

KellyDawson

I think it is yeah, as security is better on them compared to older cars. … I think it is yeah, as security is better on them compared to older cars. Obs tax is cheaper .. but I think its free on most of these deals anyway?


seriously considering a new car on lease, but probably need more research on the insurance part, never thought it could be free?

KellyDawson

I think it is yeah, as security is better on them compared to older cars. … I think it is yeah, as security is better on them compared to older cars. Obs tax is cheaper .. but I think its free on most of these deals anyway?



It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance underwriting; I'd say the value of the car and the risk of theft is not the factor which gets top billing when underwriters set premiums. A car valued at £1000 may cause a payout of tens of millions if say the driver causes death or serious lifechanging injuries (e.g. Agnes Collier's payout in 2012 for £23M). Underwriters assess risk using complex, multi-factorial algorithms and significant weight is given to the driver's age and gender, socio-economic status usually reflected by the occupation and residential post code, NCB/ past history of claims, driving history (e.g. points on licence, traffic-related cautions and arrests etc), history of claims for that particular model of car (e.g. coupe's vs saloons vs estates, engine size) etc. etc.

All things being equal, a newer car worth £30K would be seen to be a significantly safer bet on the road than a 15 year old car and the premium for the former could well be in the same range as for the latter; after all, innovations such as automatic braking (e.g. see ex-Google heavyweight Vic Gundotra's video on how his MB's auto braking prevented an accident on YouTube), lane guidance, ABS, EBD do save lives.

Security features in a car could have an effect on premiums in certain post-codes; e.g. if several Range Rovers in your neighbourhood had been stolen in the recent past, the premiums for ALL the poor sods in that post-code would be raised for the next few years; if you own a Range Rover your premium will skyrocket. Could even impact surrounding post-codes. In these circumstances say a tracking device being fitted on to your brand new X6 could result in a significantly lower premium compared to your neighbour with an X6 without tracking, again everything else being equal.

In general however, the full replacement cost of the motor if stolen really plays only a small part in how insurers determine your premium.



Edited by: "hcc27" 2nd Sep 2016

8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better off with a bicycle. What's the point of having a brand new car if you can barely use it.
Edited by: "Mark9988" 2nd Sep 2016

wenttoabetterplace

It's not just the overall price that needs listing....it's the REAL … It's not just the overall price that needs listing....it's the REAL monthly price. As you say, £130 per month is not correct...


Better still, work out the all-in cost per mile - that's going to give you a real comparison to other deals.

Factor in excess mileage charges (often low) and you're on to a winner.

Before service and tyres, this works out at 23p per mile or £150.87 per month. If you do 12k miles, we're talking just 17p per mile, assuming a 7ppm excess mileage charge (£174.20 per month).

Even if servicing and tyres are put in (150 and 100 per annum respectively as an estimate), it's 26p per mile at 8k p/a and 20ppm at 12k p/a.

This is a good deal. Pence per mile is the best *real* metric for measuring a lease deal and comparing to others.

Obviously factoring in upfront deposits is important, but that is often personal preference.

I am waiting for deals of their new Kodiaq.

irishbeta

Would this one not be cheaper? … Would this one not be cheaper? http://www.fleetprices.co.uk/personal-lease-cars/skoda/yeti-estate/yeti-estate-12-tsi-110-monte-carlo-5dr-dsg-102899508



NO. An average of £160 p.m. v's £151 p.m. on this deal.

Mark9988

8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better … 8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better off with a bicycle. What's the point of having a brand new car if you can barely use it.



I use my current (lease) car to commute and barely use it on weekends (use family car). Average work attendance in a year for most people is around 220 days/yr. So the sum for me and many others is 8000/220 not 8000/365. Which is 36m/day. Which is pretty much the exact distance of my commute. And I'm not cycling that every day So 8k/yr would work for me, although I happen to have 10k on my current deal. And excess mileage ppm charges often work out same/cheaper than paying for more miles in the monthly cost. So never dismiss a lease deal solely on the mileage restriction.

Mark9988

8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better … 8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better off with a bicycle. What's the point of having a brand new car if you can barely use it.



​Can't fit wife and kids on the bike even if I only do 1000 miles

hcc27

It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance … It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance underwriting...



Good explanation. All credit for taking the time to post

been looking for a cheap lease with automatic gearbox for my folks. this fits the bill perfectly! I wonder if the rental would decrease if the mileage was dropped to 5k? They spend a fortune on an ageing Chrysler neon when they could be driving in comfort in this and keeping the grandchildren far safer!

M_z

Seems a very good price, odd that they'd put a DSG gearbox in a car that … Seems a very good price, odd that they'd put a DSG gearbox in a car that isnt even vaguely sporty - but I think you can also use in the same way as standard automatic?



Probably what they could salvage from the VW parts bin :P

Fiat tend to do that quite a bit too.

hcc27

It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance underwriting; … It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance underwriting; I'd say the value of the car and the risk of theft is not the factor which gets top billing when underwriters set premiums. A car valued at £1000 may cause a payout of tens of millions if say the driver causes death or serious lifechanging injuries (e.g. Agnes Collier's payout in 2012 for £23M). Underwriters assess risk using complex, multi-factorial algorithms and significant weight is given to the driver's age, NCB/ past history of claims, driving history (e.g. points on licence, traffic-related cautions and arrests etc), history of claims for that particular model of car (e.g. coupe's vs saloons vs estates, engine size) etc. etc. All things being equal, a newer car worth £30K would be seen to be a significantly safer bet on the road than a 15 year old car and the premium for the former could well be in the same range as for the latter; after all, innovations such as automatic braking (e.g. see ex-Google heavyweight Vic Gundotra's video on how his MB's auto braking prevented an accident on YouTube), lane guidance, ABS, EBD do save lives. Security features in a car could have an effect on premiums in certain post-codes; e.g. if several Range Rovers in your neighbourhood had been stolen in the recent past, the premiums for ALL the poor sods in that post-code would be raised for the next few years; if you own a Range Rover your premium will skyrocket. Could even impact surrounding post-codes.In general however, the full replacement cost of the motor if stolen really plays only a small part in how insurers determine your premium.



One of my friends used to be an insurance broker - he told me that NCD is basically a marketing gimmick. He said the only time it makes a difference is if you have 0 no claims, as that probably means you've not been recently driving.

I didn't believe him and did the same quote on confused.com with 1 year and 5 years, made sod all difference to the price.

meem

sorry to go off topic, can someone please advice if the insurance is … sorry to go off topic, can someone please advice if the insurance is lower for new cars?



​Insurance is generally cheaper on new cars especially if they're fitted with the automatic braking. Usually called city braking or something similar depending on the manufacturer.

My 2009 BMW with 177bhp cost £400 per year to insure yet the Golf R estate I'm getting soon with 300bhp only costs £260 to insure for the year. Even though it's got alot more power I'm guessing the tech helps reduce the costs.

bma1445

Probably what they could salvage from the VW parts bin :P


Maybe that's why Skoda's reliability record is better than VW's then, is it? I think you need to wise up.

checkcanopy

​Insurance is generally cheaper on new cars especially if they're fitted w … ​Insurance is generally cheaper on new cars especially if they're fitted with the automatic braking. Usually called city braking or something similar depending on the manufacturer. My 2009 BMW with 177bhp cost £400 per year to insure yet the Golf R estate I'm getting soon with 300bhp only costs £260 to insure for the year. Even though it's got alot more power I'm guessing the tech helps reduce the costs.


Probably something to do with being an estate too. You never see a "boy racer" driving an estate, and it probably has a far lower crash rate than the hatchback version.

hcc27

It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance underwriting; … It's not only a case of security when it comes to insurance underwriting; I'd say the value of the car and the risk of theft is not the factor which gets top billing when underwriters set premiums. A car valued at £1000 may cause a payout of tens of millions if say the driver causes death or serious lifechanging injuries (e.g. Agnes Collier's payout in 2012 for £23M). Underwriters assess risk using complex, multi-factorial algorithms and significant weight is given to the driver's age and gender, socio-economic status usually reflected by the occupation and residential post code, NCB/ past history of claims, driving history (e.g. points on licence, traffic-related cautions and arrests etc), history of claims for that particular model of car (e.g. coupe's vs saloons vs estates, engine size) etc. etc. All things being equal, a newer car worth £30K would be seen to be a significantly safer bet on the road than a 15 year old car and the premium for the former could well be in the same range as for the latter; after all, innovations such as automatic braking (e.g. see ex-Google heavyweight Vic Gundotra's video on how his MB's auto braking prevented an accident on YouTube), lane guidance, ABS, EBD do save lives. Security features in a car could have an effect on premiums in certain post-codes; e.g. if several Range Rovers in your neighbourhood had been stolen in the recent past, the premiums for ALL the poor sods in that post-code would be raised for the next few years; if you own a Range Rover your premium will skyrocket. Could even impact surrounding post-codes. In these circumstances say a tracking device being fitted on to your brand new X6 could result in a significantly lower premium compared to your neighbour with an X6 without tracking, again everything else being equal.In general however, the full replacement cost of the motor if stolen really plays only a small part in how insurers determine your premium.



youtube.com/wat…VPM

DangerousTheory

Probably something to do with being an estate too. You never see a "boy … Probably something to do with being an estate too. You never see a "boy racer" driving an estate, and it probably has a far lower crash rate than the hatchback version.



Wanna bet - Have a look at this

CrazyBob

Wanna bet - Have a look at this



That only happens if you fit an Audi TT RS Engine in to your Skoda Yeti which was why the Ariel Atom couldn't catch up. That Skoda Yeti has over 500BHP available.

I think this is the same one >

youtube.com/wat…iow

Here you go >

youtube.com/wat…pAk

"It has the TT-RS wheel from the car I took the engine out of. The RS wheel is better for track days than the stock Yeti one. If you look, the dash is all Yeti."
Edited by: "fishmaster" 2nd Sep 2016

Mark9988

8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better … 8000 miles works out 21m/day. If you do this kind of mileage you better off with a bicycle. What's the point of having a brand new car if you can barely use it.



Sooo.... ask for a higher mileage deal when you enquire?

CrazyBob

Wanna bet - Have a look at this


That really doesn't relate to my comment. Insurance is all about statistics, and statistically there will be far, far fewer crashes in estate vehicles versus hatchbacks, especially due to dangerous, boy racer-type driving.
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