Skywatcher Heritage 100P Dobsonian Telescope £94.99 delivered @ rothervalleyoptics
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Skywatcher Heritage 100P Dobsonian Telescope £94.99 delivered @ rothervalleyoptics

28
Found 11th Feb 2016
Had a look at various telescope and this one is a fair price with decent reviews.

100mm (4") f/4 Parabolic Tabletop Dobsonian

The compact Heritage-100P is a lightweight and convenient grab-and-go scope. With its quality 100mm f/4 parabolic optics, it can be used to view the Moon and bright planets and also has enough light gathering for the observation of star clusters, bright galaxies and nebulae. A 3/8" thread located on the base allows it also to used on a suitable field tripod. Supplied with gift box.

•Magnifications (with optics supplied): x16, x32, x40 & x80
•Diameter of Primary Mirror: 100mm (4")
•Telescope Focal Length: 400mm (f/4)
•Eyepieces Supplied (1.25"): 10mm & 25mm
•x2 Barlow Lens
•Parabolic Primary Mirror
•Red Dot Finder
•Rack and Pinion Focuser
•Wooden Alt-Azimuth Mount
•Weight Approx 2.8kg
- Zuulan
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29 Comments
Banned
Looks good, just need to find some lob sided princess boobs to look at from the roadside about 20 miles away from where she is.
Graham1979

Looks good, just need to find some lob sided princess boobs to look at … Looks good, just need to find some lob sided princess boobs to look at from the roadside about 20 miles away from where she is.



​Just stand naked in front of a full length mirror.
Cannot go wrong with a Dobby and for that price excellent - whatever you are looking at ;-)
Banned
Cheapest I have seen. Hot
Noob question , but how "far" can you see. I mean the stars , not into my neighbours bedrooms. My garden is south facing and i can see a lot sky when there isnt any cloud.
£99 on amazon for those with prime.

amazon.co.uk/Sky…BXI
Edited by moderator: "Feb 12, 2016 12:57" 12th Feb 2016
pimpchez

Noob question , but how "far" can you see. I mean the stars , not into my … Noob question , but how "far" can you see. I mean the stars , not into my neighbours bedrooms. My garden is south facing and i can see a lot sky when there isnt any cloud.



From a review (Outside of viewing star clusters) :

Jupiter was small even with the 10mm eyepiece, but we could see the equatorial bands and the four Galilean moons. Mars surprised us: the Dobsonian revealed a polar cap and dusky markings on the planet’s small disc. Saturn and its rings were a delight, with Titan and Rhea also visible and we were able to see plenty of craters on our Moon, although not in great detail.

The Heritage 100P is a small, simple scope but it can provide rewarding views as long as you have realistic expectations.
In how much detail will i see Uranus with this?
red23

In how much detail will i see Uranus with this?



You'll definately see the ring
The problem with this one is that you need something stable to put it on. If you are using it in the back garden it might not be much of a problem but if taking it somewhere with less light pollution you might want to think about buying one with a tripod eg Skywatcher 130p but it is £40 more....
Are there any binoculars in this price range that would be just as good? Been wanting to buy something for ages but don't know where to start. Someone mentioned binoculars so hoping anyone can help please
gari189

The problem with this one is that you need something stable to put it on. … The problem with this one is that you need something stable to put it on. If you are using it in the back garden it might not be much of a problem but if taking it somewhere with less light pollution you might want to think about buying one with a tripod eg Skywatcher 130p but it is £40 more....



I'd probably second this. With a 130mm aperture the light gathering ability is 335 times the unaided eye compared to around about 210 times with the 100mm. Also bear in mind that with astronomy, it's not all about how close your lenses can get to see the object, it's very much to do with how much light your mirror can gather in order to see more detail and more distant objects. I'd also recommend a scope with an equatorial mount, especially if you want to take up astrophotography.

Having said that, after talking like the nerd I refuse to admit I am, this is a decent price. So hot from me. It's just horses for courses...

Astronomy is a frustrating, rewarding and slippery financial slope, lol. The reviews aren't bad and as a previous comment said if you have "realistic expectations" and those are really with something like this is to see stars. If it gives you the bug to want to see more and join the dark side, you'll be upgrading in no time. Best thing before making any purchases is to ask advice on the astro forums and go to your local astronomy club =)

I Image nebulae & galaxies, but my best wow moments have been seeing Saturn for the first time, the pleiades and then andromeda through a pair of binoculars, it was just a fuzzy blob but still amazing.

stargazerslounge.com/top…n=1

skyatnightmagazine.com/rev…ian

pimpchez

Noob question , but how "far" can you see. I mean the stars , not into my … Noob question , but how "far" can you see. I mean the stars , not into my neighbours bedrooms. My garden is south facing and i can see a lot sky when there isnt any cloud.

After reading all the comments I think I might get the next model up. Can somebody with more knowledge in this area please recommend one? I have been meaning to get a telescope for ages as I love anything to do with space but I have no idea where to start. thanks.
No sighting scope means passing on this.
bindadesi

After reading all the comments I think I might get the next model up. Can … After reading all the comments I think I might get the next model up. Can somebody with more knowledge in this area please recommend one? I have been meaning to get a telescope for ages as I love anything to do with space but I have no idea where to start. thanks.


The first thing you need to do is understand what you will actually be seeing through the eyepiece is nothing remotely like the images of galaxies that you see on the news or 'sky at night'. You will be seeing faint fuzzy blobs for galaxies (if you can find them). The moon is impressive, as are Jupiter and Saturn.

I'd suggest getting hold of a book called 'Turn Left at Orion' which has some good representations of what you are likely to see with a modest sized telescope. EDIT have a look here for the online resources from said book cambridge.org/fea…ft/

I'd say an 8 inch dob is the sweet spot for occasional astronomers such as myself. this would set you back around £275. firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml
Edited by: "ikorodu" 12th Feb 2016
mwa

No sighting scope means passing on this.


its got a red dot finder, which with the right charts is usable.
Banned
finnmaccool

​Just stand naked in front of a full length mirror.



I said boobs not moobs ha ha ha
Edited by: "Graham1979" 12th Feb 2016
bindadesi

After reading all the comments I think I might get the next model up. Can … After reading all the comments I think I might get the next model up. Can somebody with more knowledge in this area please recommend one? I have been meaning to get a telescope for ages as I love anything to do with space but I have no idea where to start. thanks.



I wouldn't go crazy to start with. But I would recommend one with an equatorial mount as I suggested above. My first telescope was a Skywatcher Skyhawk 1145P (114mm / 4.5"), and it was perfect. It got me into astrophotography as well as being able see great detail like the rings of Saturn. It was a reflector, so bear in mind when you look through it everything is upside down (but what's the right way in space?).

The Skywatcher mentioned above is a good starter, but there are also Celestron scopes similar to that which you may be able to find cheaper. There was a 130mm Celestron on one of the Amazon deals of the day 3 weeks or so ago for £90. May be worth waiting to see if it comes around again.

ikorodu

The first thing you need to do is understand what you will actually be … The first thing you need to do is understand what you will actually be seeing through the eyepiece is nothing remotely like the images of galaxies that you see on the news or 'sky at night'. You will be seeing faint fuzzy blobs for galaxies (if you can find them). The moon is impressive, as are Jupiter and Saturn.I'd suggest getting hold of a book called 'Turn Left at Orion' which has some good representations of what you are likely to see with a modest sized telescope. EDIT have a look here for the online resources from said book http://www.cambridge.org/features/turnleft/I'd say an 8 inch dob is the sweet spot for occasional astronomers such as myself. this would set you back around £275. http://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-skyliner-200p-dobsonian.html


great info thanks! looks like I need to do some more saving.
bindadesi

great info thanks! looks like I need to do some more saving.


Keep an eye on Gumtree and Ebay. I suspect some people buy these thinking it is a case of point and shoot and you get Hubble like images, only to be a bit disillusioned by a fuzzy blob.
Original Poster
Please expire this. Just received an email stating that these are sold out until end of the month.
What's the second hand market like? As with musical instruments I usually look there first.
hiezra

Are there any binoculars in this price range that would be just as good? … Are there any binoculars in this price range that would be just as good? Been wanting to buy something for ages but don't know where to start. Someone mentioned binoculars so hoping anyone can help please



Bins are *much* better for starting with sky watching. 10x50 will give you a good combination of light gathering (the 50, higher will make the binoculars very heavy) and magnification (10 is about as high as you'd want to go without a tripod).

The light gathering properties of the big front lenses mean you can see objects in the sky that are otherwise invisible to the naked eye. Even looking from an average suburban garden you'd be amazed at the extra detail you can find in the sky on a clear night

You can find 10x50 bins for well under £50. I got a pair of Olympus DPS I for £27 a couple years back
I know it's a step up in size, portability etc but just get a 150p Skywatcher dobsonian, it will make a huge difference.

I use a 12" OO newt mounted on an EQ6 Pro but had a 6" before, great size.
Standard price not really a deal
Only £89 so you would be kicking yourself if you went for it at the higher price
jamesantro

Only £89 so you would be kicking yourself if you went for it at the … Only £89 so you would be kicking yourself if you went for it at the higher price



Just spotted with postage sorry
Don't forget you have to lug whatever scope you buy out to your garden then set it up and wait for it to cool down. This can get tedious with our lovely British weather resulting in you only getting an hour or less of viewing a night.
I have a small mak that at 127mm is a bit on the small side but is much more portable than a Newtonian reflector and doesn't take too long to cool down.
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