Smart Price 3-Arm Rotary Clothes Airer £ 7.99 @ asda
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Smart Price 3-Arm Rotary Clothes Airer £ 7.99 @ asda

3
Found 25th May 2012
•3 arm rotary airer supplied with ground socket for installation into concrete.
•30mtrs of easy wipe clean PVC coated polyester line.
•Painted steel 32mm centre pole & arms providing strength & durability.
•4 stage umbrella clip allows retensioning in warmer weather.
•Split pole design for ease of transportation.
•Easy to assemble.
•Turning circle of 1.92m making it suitable for smaller gardens.
•Will hold up to 20kg which is approximately 3 wash loads.

3 Comments

Perhaps I'm not getting it, but I don't see the point in one of these, since the clothes pegged to the inner lines don't get any sun and stay dry (unless it's a windy day or scorching hot of course). Heat added for price but these things are pointless.

Gball

Perhaps I'm not getting it, but I don't see the point in one of these, … Perhaps I'm not getting it, but I don't see the point in one of these, since the clothes pegged to the inner lines don't get any sun and stay dry (unless it's a windy day or scorching hot of course). Heat added for price but these things are pointless.



We used to have 4 lines across the garden now we just have a bigger one of these .......a godsend

Original Poster

Gball

Perhaps I'm not getting it, but I don't see the point in one of these, … Perhaps I'm not getting it, but I don't see the point in one of these, since the clothes pegged to the inner lines don't get any sun and stay dry (unless it's a windy day or scorching hot of course). Heat added for price but these things are pointless.



this might help

Outdoor drying

Outdoor drying (sometimes called air-drying) with a clothes line or rotary dryer has several big advantages: it's free, it uses no energy (so it's environmentally friendly), it generally leaves your clothes smelling fresh, and it means you don't make your home damp and cold by drying things inside. The drawbacks include the time taken to dry things (which can range from a few hours to a day or more), the chance of rain making your clothes wetter than they were when you hung them out, the risk of theft, and the possibility of air pollution making your clothes dirty again.

The science we've already considered tells us that the best conditions for outdoor drying will be warm, windy days when the humidity is relatively low. Since we want air to move around our clothes, it's best to dry them off the ground where the air moves faster (which also helps to lift them away from any ground-level moisture). Although hot, breezy, summer days are perfect for outdoor drying, you may find you can dry things outside for much of the year, if you keep science in mind (it depends to a large extent on the climate where you live). Water can turn from a liquid into a vapor at any temperature above freezing. In other words, providing the air isn't damp, you can theoretically dry clothes outside any day of the year. Living near the sea with the benefit of dry winter sea breezes, I can sometimes dry huge sheets outside even in the middle of winter (or get them half or two thirds dry at least).

In theory, you can even dry things outdoors in the very depths of winter. Instead of the liquid water evaporating and turning into a gas, it will cool down and turn to ice, which will then very slowly turn directly to a gas by the process of sublimation. If you want to dry clothes this way, you need to be incredibly patient and quite prepared to leave them outdoors for days until all the liquid water has turned to water vapor. If you let your clothes freeze solid and then bring them back indoors before they're dry, you're probably going to use more energy than if you'd simply dried them indoors to start with, because you'll have to heat them up to thaw them out (turning the ice back to water) and then dry them conventionally as well.

explainthatstuff.com/how…tml
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