Social Anxiety Solution: Proven Techniques for Overcoming Shyness, Social Anxiety, Low Self-Esteem, and Negative Emotions / Kindle @ Amazon
771°

Social Anxiety Solution: Proven Techniques for Overcoming Shyness, Social Anxiety, Low Self-Esteem, and Negative Emotions / Kindle @ Amazon

FREE£5.49Amazon Deals
40
Found 7th AprEdited by:"MadeInBeats"
Are you sick and tired of living in fear? I certainly was. My name is Beau, the author of this book, and 4 years ago I decided to make some major changes in my life. At the time, I suffered with severe social anxiety and depression. I couldn't take it any longer, and so I committed myself to self-improvement. I am proud to say that I am a completely different person today. This book is a compilation of many of the exact strategies I have personally used to go from shy and insecure to someone who is extremely confident, happy, and successful. I'm here to tell you that everything you desire is certainly within reach. If I can do it, so can you.

Here are a few of the things you will learn in this book:

  • How to overcome your shyness and social anxiety by reprogramming your mind
  • How to use visualization to change your personality and behavior
  • How to use bioenergetic exercises to eliminate stress, anxiety, and negative emotions
  • How to avoid the traps that keep you stuck in your old ways of thinking and behaving
  • And MUCH more.

This is not only a book for helping you cure your social anxiety. It is a book for helping you to improve nearly every single aspect of your life!

These strategies work and they work well! They have allowed me to completely transform my life and get on the path to living my dreams. You are capable of doing the same! Just put these strategies and techniques to work for you and you will be well on your way to greatness!
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt.

If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health services

By the way. NHS, also 100% free.

PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.
I've also read some self help books over the years by so called 'charlatans' and so called PHDs. Good advice is good advice. Ive read a few of these books and come out thinking it was nothing more than just common sense. When some people are depressed and in a hole sometimes the most obvious advice seems elusive. If these books help people feel bette and lead a happier life then Im all for them. Plus its FREE!
Original Poster
sebrichter3 h, 40 m ago

Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge …Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge of a subject area. I for one do not believe this is possible without academic research, as whether you like it or not, degrees are a globally accepted system for proving expertise. I for one would not see a self trained doctor for a surgery, neither would I accept medical advise about my mental health from someone that didn’t conduct academic research.


He isn't professing to be anything other than (direct quote):

This book is a compilation of many of the exact strategies I have personally used to go from shy and insecure to someone who is extremely confident, happy, and successful.

It's a book about his personal experience. Your advice is great and perhaps vastly more beneficial than it would be reading this book. But I think you should redact 'charlatan' as you are misusing the word in this circumstance.

I don't see any harm people reading this for free whilst languishing on the often bloated NHS waiting list..
Edited by: "MadeInBeats" 7th Apr
sebrichter1 h, 44 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe antidepressants. Waiting lists for therapy can take months. Medication comes with their own side effects, withdrawal effects, etc.

Any free advice that may help is always welcome.
Edited by: "Lotsoftrees" 7th Apr
40 Comments
Original Poster
Reviews are quite positive.
Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt.

If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health services

By the way. NHS, also 100% free.

PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.
I'd sooner recommend seeing a GP and asking for a referral. Or look online at the NHS site for other proper options. I was referred for a course of CBT and it was genuinely life changing, all completely free too.
sebrichter8 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


I've liked your comment, but by the time profit has been scalped by private-care providers there will be little increase on the frontline. And always individuals have to make the start to change themselves and books like this can offer the incentive. Being free one could hardly accuse the writer of shamelessly exploiting ill people, although other writer can and do..
Original Poster
sebrichter9 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


Charlatan might be a bit strong.
From the onset he presents himself as someone who researched self-help and documented in this book the things which worked for him.
I've also read some self help books over the years by so called 'charlatans' and so called PHDs. Good advice is good advice. Ive read a few of these books and come out thinking it was nothing more than just common sense. When some people are depressed and in a hole sometimes the most obvious advice seems elusive. If these books help people feel bette and lead a happier life then Im all for them. Plus its FREE!
MadeInBeats45 m ago

Charlatan might be a bit strong. From the onset he presents himself as …Charlatan might be a bit strong. From the onset he presents himself as someone who researched self-help and documented in this book the things which worked for him.


Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge of a subject area. I for one do not believe this is possible without academic research, as whether you like it or not, degrees are a globally accepted system for proving expertise. I for one would not see a self trained doctor for a surgery, neither would I accept medical advise about my mental health from someone that didn’t conduct academic research.
Adult57 m ago

Hi, my name's Beau and, like everyone else named Beau, my parents …Hi, my name's Beau and, like everyone else named Beau, my parents condemned me to have a miserable childhood, continually mocked because of my stupid name.Well, there's your synopsis. Read the book if you want that sentence padded-out over a few dozen pages.Edit: I haven't read the book, obviously, but since I don't have a daft name there really wasn't much point.

​If you haven't read the book then why criticise?
Thanks.
Original Poster
sebrichter3 h, 40 m ago

Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge …Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge of a subject area. I for one do not believe this is possible without academic research, as whether you like it or not, degrees are a globally accepted system for proving expertise. I for one would not see a self trained doctor for a surgery, neither would I accept medical advise about my mental health from someone that didn’t conduct academic research.


He isn't professing to be anything other than (direct quote):

This book is a compilation of many of the exact strategies I have personally used to go from shy and insecure to someone who is extremely confident, happy, and successful.

It's a book about his personal experience. Your advice is great and perhaps vastly more beneficial than it would be reading this book. But I think you should redact 'charlatan' as you are misusing the word in this circumstance.

I don't see any harm people reading this for free whilst languishing on the often bloated NHS waiting list..
Edited by: "MadeInBeats" 7th Apr
sebrichter1 h, 44 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe antidepressants. Waiting lists for therapy can take months. Medication comes with their own side effects, withdrawal effects, etc.

Any free advice that may help is always welcome.
Edited by: "Lotsoftrees" 7th Apr
Lotsoftrees26 m ago

A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe …A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe antidepressants. Waiting lists for therapy can take months. Medication comes with their own side effects, withdrawal effects, etc. Any free advice that may help is always welcome.


Fair enough. I personally wouldn’t read it, but I simply asked for those that read this to be sceptical. Also my own mental health journey on the NHS was medication free and very caring - granted, i could have just been lucky.
Original Poster
sebrichter8 m ago

Fair enough. I personally wouldn’t read it, but I simply asked for those t …Fair enough. I personally wouldn’t read it, but I simply asked for those that read this to be sceptical. Also my own mental health journey on the NHS was medication free and very caring - granted, i could have just been lucky.


NHS is a postcode lottery.
sebrichter2 h, 27 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


"If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. " You've accused someone of being a charlatan and then proceeded to give out your own advice. The reason the NHS mental health services have been given more money is because they were failing in that area (source "Damning report finds ‘serious failings’ in NHS mental health services" The Guardian March 2018). Hopefully the money will help to make the much needed improvements!


From the mental health charity Mind

"Self-help resources. A self-help resource might be the first treatment option your doctor offers you. This is because it's available quite quickly, and there's a chance it could help you to feel better without needing to try other options."

and...


"Unfortunately NHS waiting lists for talking treatments can be very long. If you're finding it hard to access talking treatments you could consider:

  • Charities and specialist organisations. See useful contacts for a list of organisations that may offer therapy or be able to put you in touch with local services. Mind's Infoline could also help you find services near you.
  • Private therapy. Finding a private therapist is another option some people choose to explore, but it's not suitable for everyone because it can be expensive. (See our page on private treatment for more information.)"



There are multiple self-help books and this one is free so people can have a scan through and see if it's something that would work for them. People can read multiple self-help books on one subject before finding an author that they can relate to - what works for them may not be right for someone else.
sebrichter2 h, 52 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


Free at the point of source, but certainly not free for those of us that pay a fortune in NIC
JonathanFry1 h, 28 m ago

Free at the point of source, but certainly not free for those of us that …Free at the point of source, but certainly not free for those of us that pay a fortune in NIC


No doubt you'll get your NIC's worth if you get diagnosed with cancer or other terminal illness.
Thank you MadeInBeats, I think some people get scared of alternative help and that is their reaction, medication isn’t always the best answer. Psychology and the way we have been bought up with life events is usually our main psychology structure and cognitive behaviour pattern, it shapes our coping mechanisms. We can all be anything we want to be with knowledge, learning and great insight. TV should be teaching us slightly more positive stuff too.
sebrichter6 h, 4 m ago

Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no …Looking further into the author - he appears like a charlatan to me (no acknowledgement of substantial academic research in the field), so I would consume any of his mental health advise with great care and more than a pinch of salt. If you’re feeling low and suffering from mental health problems, the NHS is probably your best point of call. More so now with increased funding for mental health services: NHS mental health servicesBy the way. NHS, also 100% free. PS: i didn’t vote hot or cold.


Might be free for you but I pay National Insurance for it.

You can thank me later.
Cremoso9917 m ago

Might be free for you but I pay National Insurance for it.You can thank me …Might be free for you but I pay National Insurance for it.You can thank me later.



While I’m glad that given your statement it can be assumed you never had to rely on the NHS for expensive care, health is not a constant. While I wish you to be healthy for many years to come, there may come a point in every person’s life where they can no longer work and have to rely on the NHS to get better.

The way I look at it: either you’re healthy your whole life and never need extensive/expensive care from the NHS, or when you fall ill you’re well taken care of, regardless of how much you contributed over your life. Either way, it’s a win for you.
sebrichter1 h, 12 m ago

While I’m glad that given your statement it can be assumed you never had t …While I’m glad that given your statement it can be assumed you never had to rely on the NHS for expensive care, health is not a constant. While I wish you to be healthy for many years to come, there may come a point in every person’s life where they can no longer work and have to rely on the NHS to get better. The way I look at it: either you’re healthy your whole life and never need extensive/expensive care from the NHS, or when you fall ill you’re well taken care of, regardless of how much you contributed over your life. Either way, it’s a win for you.


Yes but it's not free is it?

People who work pay for it.
Cremoso9931 m ago

Yes but it's not free is it?People who work pay for it.


Frankly I don’t see your point.
Cremoso9940 m ago

Yes but it's not free is it?People who work pay for it.


It's free at the point of use, and long may that continue.
One of the best health systems in the world despite funding shortages.
Suspended
sebrichter3 h, 37 m ago

Frankly I don’t see your point.


Time to get some glasses then.
Edited by: "1992Buffy" 7th Apr
annedawso4 h, 9 m ago

It's free at the point of use, and long may that continue.One of the best …It's free at the point of use, and long may that continue.One of the best health systems in the world despite funding shortages.


Not one of the best in the Western World I'm afraid.
Hey, don't diss the Charlatans, pal! Now't wrong with Charlatans!

33597960-Ecwch.jpg
OK, they're 'the only one I know'.
sebrichter4 h, 20 m ago

Frankly I don’t see your point.


That's it's only free to people who don't pay in, or have never paid in.
Go to your local public library and borrow their “reading well” books. These are recommended by health professionals for common mental health conditions.....
reading-well.org.uk/boo…ons
Edited by: "gari189" 7th Apr
Northerner47312 h, 44 m ago

I'd sooner recommend seeing a GP and asking for a referral. Or look online …I'd sooner recommend seeing a GP and asking for a referral. Or look online at the NHS site for other proper options. I was referred for a course of CBT and it was genuinely life changing, all completely free too.


Got a link for that course?
Lotsoftrees11 h, 9 m ago

A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe …A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe antidepressants. Waiting lists for therapy can take months. Medication comes with their own side effects, withdrawal effects, etc. Any free advice that may help is always welcome.


and what if the 'free advice' does the opposite and makes someone worse?
The reason CBT can work is that the CPN can keep an eye on whats happening and change the tasks etc if something looks like its doing more harm than good, which does happen, a lot.
With something like this, I would suggest, at best, use it alongside any CBT in place and discuss the options the book gives with your CPN to see what they think before blindly following someone who has no medical training.
mug2k11 m ago

Got a link for that course?



nhs.uk/con…ng/

gives a run down of whats likely to be available, and you can search for the local ones here

nhs.uk/Ser…908

As for waiting times, I believe most areas don't have too much of a wait, 6-8 weeks before you get into a room with someone seems to be about average from what I see and hear, but can be shorter or longer depending how specialist th eproblems are and how bad they are.

What usually happens, and I can't say for certain if this applies to all areas, you self refer by ringing them, they will arrange a telephone appointment which takes 30-60 mins, where they go through a series of questions, which then determines the route you take into the service. Most people get put onto a short 6-8 session course, which helps in many cases, then if they are worse than expected will be passed to a higher level, which is likely to be 12-20 weeks.
Edited by: "julieallen" 7th Apr
mug2k7 m ago

Got a link for that course?


If you’re in London/Royal borough of Greenwich, this is a self-referral service that is completely free: oxleas.nhs.uk/adv…t1/
sebrichter6 m ago

If you’re in London/Royal borough of Greenwich, this is a self-referral s …If you’re in London/Royal borough of Greenwich, this is a self-referral service that is completely free: http://oxleas.nhs.uk/advice-and-guidance/greenwich-time-talk-iapt1/


I hope theres more questions after the basic 'mood' ones they show with tick boxes!

Sunderland's is here if it helps anyone sunderlandiapt.co.uk/sel…al/
julieallen50 m ago

and what if the 'free advice' does the opposite and makes someone …and what if the 'free advice' does the opposite and makes someone worse?The reason CBT can work is that the CPN can keep an eye on whats happening and change the tasks etc if something looks like its doing more harm than good, which does happen, a lot. With something like this, I would suggest, at best, use it alongside any CBT in place and discuss the options the book gives with your CPN to see what they think before blindly following someone who has no medical training.


You said it much more succinctly. I agree 100%
julieallen2 h, 31 m ago

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/free-therapy-or-counselling/gives a run down of whats likely to be available, and you can search for the local ones herehttps://www.nhs.uk/Service-Search/Cognitive-behavioural-therapy-(CBT)/LocationSearch/1908As for waiting times, I believe most areas don't have too much of a wait, 6-8 weeks before you get into a room with someone seems to be about average from what I see and hear, but can be shorter or longer depending how specialist th eproblems are and how bad they are.What usually happens, and I can't say for certain if this applies to all areas, you self refer by ringing them, they will arrange a telephone appointment which takes 30-60 mins, where they go through a series of questions, which then determines the route you take into the service. Most people get put onto a short 6-8 session course, which helps in many cases, then if they are worse than expected will be passed to a higher level, which is likely to be 12-20 weeks.


Crikey you were lucky, or it's changed for the better. About 11 years ago, there was an 18 month waiting list for me!
julieallen14 h, 29 m ago

and what if the 'free advice' does the opposite and makes someone …and what if the 'free advice' does the opposite and makes someone worse?The reason CBT can work is that the CPN can keep an eye on whats happening and change the tasks etc if something looks like its doing more harm than good, which does happen, a lot. With something like this, I would suggest, at best, use it alongside any CBT in place and discuss the options the book gives with your CPN to see what they think before blindly following someone who has no medical training.


I think anyone reading any advice online, in books, or even in the media/press, should never blindly follow it, or use it as an alternative to proper medical advice.

Having said that, some GPs even recommend ‘books on prescription’ for milder issues - gps.camdenccg.nhs.uk/service/books-on-prescription

My experience with the NHS for mental health was not good (long waiting lists, time-limited therapy and then sent back to GP, feeling pressured to go on medication, which caused so many side effects and horrific withdrawals), which is why I welcome any free advice I can get that may help in any way.
Edited by: "Lotsoftrees" 8th Apr
sebrichter7th Apr

Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge …Well, charlatan is defined as someone to claim to have extensive knowledge of a subject area. I for one do not believe this is possible without academic research, as whether you like it or not, degrees are a globally accepted system for proving expertise. I for one would not see a self trained doctor for a surgery, neither would I accept medical advise about my mental health from someone that didn’t conduct academic research.


No offense mate but this kind of snobbery is wrong, people don't need a certificate to prove they have experience of dealing with social anxiety. i'd understand if it was 20 years ago but does it really matter? it's free? nah it doesn't lol
Lotsoftrees7th Apr

A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe …A lot of the time the first port-of-call for the NHS would be to prescribe antidepressants. Waiting lists for therapy can take months. Medication comes with their own side effects, withdrawal effects, etc. Any free advice that may help is always welcome.


More like years, 12 months for urgent phone assessment, further 6 months for face to face assessment then another 8 months for 1st appointment.

Unfortunately the individual I saw was utterly useless & on 1st visit contradicted all current thinking on CFS/fibromyalgia/ME & PVFS & said it was due to bad memories & I was probably abused as a child & suppressed it & that's why I'm so ill now.

I attended 4 or 5 appointments after that but honestly it was a total waste of time and the treatment involved me sitting imagining myself on a beach alone whilst she tapped me on the knees.

Gave up after that & just accepted I'm depressed & if I feel really bad I just accept its a brain thing & try to ride it out until I feel a bit better.

I've been on all the SSRI'S SNRI'S etc and nothing reliably helps so I've just been written off.
Rich442 h, 40 m ago

More like years, 12 months for urgent phone assessment, further 6 months …More like years, 12 months for urgent phone assessment, further 6 months for face to face assessment then another 8 months for 1st appointment.Unfortunately the individual I saw was utterly useless & on 1st visit contradicted all current thinking on CFS/fibromyalgia/ME & PVFS & said it was due to bad memories & I was probably abused as a child & suppressed it & that's why I'm so ill now.I attended 4 or 5 appointments after that but honestly it was a total waste of time and the treatment involved me sitting imagining myself on a beach alone whilst she tapped me on the knees.Gave up after that & just accepted I'm depressed & if I feel really bad I just accept its a brain thing & try to ride it out until I feel a bit better.I've been on all the SSRI'S SNRI'S etc and nothing reliably helps so I've just been written off.



Sorry to hear of your experiences. When your mental health is in a poor state, it’s hard enough building up the courage to even get help to begin with, so being written off after that, must be so frustrating.

It might also be worth asking for a re-referral to therapy, but stating that you would like to see a different doctor (or have a different therapy approach).

Like you, I’ve pretty much given up with NHS for mental health treatment. I was able to afford 2 private therapy sessions whilst on an NHS waiting list and the difference was like night-and-day. Unfortunately I couldn’t afford more than that. The doctors I saw on the NHS were all great, just felt the goal was to discharge me to my GP ASAP, so everything was long waiting lists, and then rushed session-limited appointments.
Edited by: "Lotsoftrees" 8th Apr
Progressismade17 h, 49 m ago

No offense mate but this kind of snobbery is wrong, people don't need a …No offense mate but this kind of snobbery is wrong, people don't need a certificate to prove they have experience of dealing with social anxiety. i'd understand if it was 20 years ago but does it really matter? it's free? nah it doesn't lol


Well. I go back to my previous statement that I wouldn’t have someone without a medical degree operate on me. If you consider mental health less important than physical health your statement is fair enough. I personally do not.
I know some might swear by CBT but I wasn't taken by it whatsoever. Obviously works for some but not for others.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text