Soldering Iron for only £4.12 @ screwfix instore and online
181°Expired

Soldering Iron for only £4.12 @ screwfix instore and online

22
Found 9th Jun 2011Made hot 11th Jun 2011
for any DIYers out there, really good deal only £4.12

230V. Fine point tip and 40W element for general soldering work. Includes 1.3m power cord and 1 piece of iron support plate.

22 Comments

Not to put too fine a point on it, but just how fine a tip can a 40W iron have? 0.8mm? 1mm even? 40W irons are the cheapest type going as anyone stepping a bargain DIY/pound/shed will see them from about £2.99.

Is this suitable for soldering components onto a circuitboard?

Cheap and nasty!urgh!

i.am.lost

Is this suitable for soldering components onto a circuitboard?



Whilst these kind of irons are fine for tinning wires, it's a bit high for circuit board work. You run the risk of lifting the pads / tracks very quickly at that wattage.
I'd always recommend getting a decent soldering iron with variable temperature control for circuit work.

i.am.lost

Is this suitable for soldering components onto a circuitboard?



They are fine if you are using really cheap components and doing a simple hobby project based on a stripboard, where too much heat is not going to damage anything important, or damage the thick copper on a stripboard. Otherwise, I'd go for something better. If your soldering iron is cheaper than your components, then there is probably something wrong with it!

I'm not saying it is a bad deal, there is clearly a market for this type of tool for very basic hobbyists. Just don't expect it to perform well for more advanced work.

I got a cheap silverline iron and the tip broke when i wiped the solder of it. I cant say if this will be same or worse etc but if you will use it on expensive things or use it all time then pay more and get something better.

i.am.lost

Is this suitable for soldering components onto a circuitboard?


If you're going to use this for electronics you'll need a stand for it, too. When soldering components there's a lot of picking-up and putting-down whenever you need your "soldering" hand to position things. Since you won't want a hot iron resting on your table or workbench as one day it will surely burn it, you really should be looking for an iron that comes with a stand.
From the look of it and comparing it with a cheapo iron I bought some years ago (but hardly ever use) this looks quite large, so you might find it difficult to hold it precisely enough for detailed and accurate soldering. The handle is too far from the tip - a bit like trying to use a two-foot long pen, held at the end, to write with. Also it's unlikely you'd find a stand that will fit this iron, mostly you'd need a brand-name (such as Antex) to get a matching iron/stand.
Edited by: "pete_l" 11th Jun 2011

Cheap for very basic soldering. I wouldn't use it for anything except big through-hole components, even if that. As with all electronics, never go for the absolute cheapest option, spend the extra and go for a decent variable temperature station with a few different tips. Especially a fine tip and a chisel tip.

i.am.lost

Is this suitable for soldering components onto a circuitboard?


im looking at a weller 15w with a fine tip, they come recommended by pcb nerds
Edited by: "spaceinvader" 11th Jun 2011

Good for tinning and wires but don't use it for static sensitive parts (transistors, ICs etc); for soldering such devices you need a quality iron. The heat isn't the big issue - its the leakage; cheap irons have a significant leakage current through the tip, which will easily destroy certain components.

At my college/uniersity we use cheapest of the cheap 25/30 watt soldering irons, never had any problem with them with 'blowing' components (apart form when using lead-free solder as it takes years to melt then when it does it spits everywhere...).

jah128

Good for tinning and wires but don't use it for static sensitive parts … Good for tinning and wires but don't use it for static sensitive parts (transistors, ICs etc); for soldering such devices you need a quality iron. The heat isn't the big issue - its the leakage; cheap irons have a significant leakage current through the tip, which will easily destroy certain components.

Not heard that one before - do you have a reference somewhere? The main problem with this iron is the lack of temperature control. Anyone who uses a temperature controlled iron for the first time will find it a revelation. The lower-wattage ones will still get too hot when resting (causing the tips to wear out quickly), and you can get fine tips for quite high powered temperature controlled irons (thinking about my 40W Antex soldering station which I've had for decades and has only eaten through a couple of tips).
Edited by: "pibpob" 11th Jun 2011

got one at work and its rubbish.. prob the worst i've used.

Went to Screwfix today. The guy working there told me to just get stuff from tool station, he said everything will probably be cheaper there even taking into account the sale.

Generally speaking, that's true - Screwfix has become fat and middle-aged, although I fear Toolstation is not far behind, now it's advertising on TV. However, it's easy to check on the website and Toolstation does not have a cheaper soldering iron.

+ £5.00 delivery?
Edited by: "lord_trumpington" 11th Jun 2011

Does the word "instore" in the title give you a clue?

Edit: I agree saying "online" is a bit cheeky though - title should really be amended.
Edited by: "pibpob" 11th Jun 2011

pibpob

Not heard that one before - do you have a reference somewhere? The main … Not heard that one before - do you have a reference somewhere? The main problem with this iron is the lack of temperature control. Anyone who uses a temperature controlled iron for the first time will find it a revelation. The lower-wattage ones will still get too hot when resting (causing the tips to wear out quickly), and you can get fine tips for quite high powered temperature controlled irons (thinking about my 40W Antex soldering station which I've had for decades and has only eaten through a couple of tips).



Not got a solid single reference, but you will probably observe on the specs for most decent branded soldering irons designed for electronics use there is a quoted leakage voltage figure and often a ground-resistance figure too. Indeed test equipment exists to specifically measure these characteristics in a given iron: see here.

Usually with cheap irons designed for less sensitive jobs these figures are not of concern, but when dealing with delicate (ie FETs, CMOS, low-voltage capacitors etc) devices it is an important consideration...

NB: Legendryan: I find that highly unlikely. For a start, schools and colleges are not meant to use anything other that silicon-rubber leaded irons (such as the basic Antex models) and they also now have to consider fume extraction. It is unlikely therefore that they would risk h&s breaches using £4 irons (basic Antex models maybe, but they are £10+ irons designed for EE purposes.)

Edited by: "jah128" 11th Jun 2011

That looks like it's more for detecting faulty soldering irons than anything else, although I may be mistaken.

pibpob

That looks like it's more for detecting faulty soldering irons than … That looks like it's more for detecting faulty soldering irons than anything else, although I may be mistaken.



Faulty irons will tend to leak more yes, as do cheap ones not specifically designed to minimise leakage... That is the whole point!

Not the point I made. My point is that even a cheap and nasty one that is functioning correctly would leak a negligible amount. Anyway, if the tip is earthed then so will be any leakage so it can't affect anything you're soldering.

Original Poster

WTF? why is that expired????
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