Soldering Iron - Just £4, reserve online @ Screwfix
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Soldering Iron - Just £4, reserve online @ Screwfix

25
Found 6th Apr 2012
230V. Fine point tip and 40W element for general soldering work. Includes 1.3m power cord and 1 piece of iron support plate.

Seems like a good price! Don't forget quidco!
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check out the review on the site
Man bought a kit for £10 needed ultra five tipped one .6mm. Heat added
you cannot go wrong for this price,tho have just seen the 1 review on screw fix web site which was bad for this product. but i would say still buy it because the buyer must have had a dud 1, and anyway 40 watts is more than you need to solder
Edited by: "marsh5000" 7th Apr 2012
Once again, you pay for what you get.

If you're a hobbyist, then absolutely perfect. If you solder every day, then why would you even consider it.
Be wary of cheap soldering irons that use a grub screw to hold their bit in place.

I've had the bit fall out of a cheap 50W one I owned, despite having ensured the grub screw was tight before use. It bounced off what I was soldering, burnt a hole through my trouser leg, slid down my trouser leg somehow without causing any serious burns to my leg, burned another hole out of my trousers, and melted several holes through an expensive vacuum cleaner's hose that was propped up under the bench I was working at, before landing on my shoe.

If you buy one I'd suggest drilling or filling a small recess into the bit where the grub screw grips it, so it can't work loose and fall out when the iron expands.

I think mine was particularly bad because its bit was made of iron (copper plated). I only bought a cheap one because my 25W Antex isn't powerful enough for odd jobs like soldering VHF transmitter sockets onto coax.

Edited by: "melted" 7th Apr 2012
melted

Be wary of cheap soldering irons that use a grub screw to hold their bit … Be wary of cheap soldering irons that use a grub screw to hold their bit in place.I've had the bit fall out of a cheap 50W one I owned, despite having ensured the grub screw was tight before use. It bounced off what I was soldering, burnt a hole through my trouser leg, slid down my trouser leg somehow without causing any serious burns to my leg, burned another hole out of my trousers, and melted several holes through an expensive vacuum cleaner's hose that was propped up under the bench I was working at, before landing on my shoe. If you buy one I'd suggest drilling or filling a small recess into the bit where the grub screw grips it, so it can't work loose and fall out when the iron expands.I think mine was particularly bad because its bit was made of iron (copper plated). I only bought a cheap one because my 25W Antex isn't powerful enough for odd jobs like soldering VHF transmitter sockets onto coax.



That's put me off any aspirations of soldering for life. oO

Edited by: "hero2zer0" 7th Apr 2012
I tend to steer clear of cheap soldering irons.

I spent years trying to work out why my soldering was rubbish until I invested in a quality gas powered iron, suddenly my soldering improved greatly.

Cheap electric irons just don't have the power to get and stay hot enough.
JezUK

...If you're a hobbyist, then absolutely perfect. If you solder every … ...If you're a hobbyist, then absolutely perfect. If you solder every day, then why would you even consider it.




I guess most HUKD readers don't solder every day, so as you say, absolutely perfect
40W is way to powerful for electronics use but fine for soldering thick wires such as those in a car.
Going_Digital

40W is way to powerful for electronics use but fine for soldering thick … 40W is way to powerful for electronics use but fine for soldering thick wires such as those in a car.



A decent soldering iron is normally 60W. The quicker you can solder a component the better as then it receives less heat stress.

Even 60W irons can struggle to melt large solder blobs quickly.
Cold, just because £4 is a pretty ordinary price for a cheap soldering iron. It really is, 110%, worth spending the extra to buy a more featureful, higher quality one. I'm not saying you need to spend £50 on an iron, but a quality tool makes any job so much better.
Voted cold , i solder as a hobbyist ( planes , helicopters , quads etc) i bought one of these when my previous one died after 6 years , this lasted less than a month as did the one they gave me to replace it the tip is also very very low quality.
Voted cold because ive used of them and even at 4 quid you are wasting the money.
Kulaak

A decent soldering iron is normally 60W. The quicker you can solder a … A decent soldering iron is normally 60W. The quicker you can solder a component the better as then it receives less heat stress.Even 60W irons can struggle to melt large solder blobs quickly.



Just the job for vaporising 0604's
Baz8755

I tend to steer clear of cheap soldering irons.I spent years trying to … I tend to steer clear of cheap soldering irons.I spent years trying to work out why my soldering was rubbish until I invested in a quality gas powered iron, suddenly my soldering improved greatly.Cheap electric irons just don't have the power to get and stay hot enough.



Sounds like me too! Any recommendations?
LammyTheLamster

Sounds like me too! Any recommendations?



Yoo could try one of these if you want to solder a really big joint
http://www.cyberattic.com/stores/1hbkc/items/1016957/catphoto.jpg
Kulaak

A decent soldering iron is normally 60W. The quicker you can solder a … A decent soldering iron is normally 60W. The quicker you can solder a component the better as then it receives less heat stress.Even 60W irons can struggle to melt large solder blobs quickly.



What on earth do you solder? My 2 most used soldering irons are 15W and 35W. I'm an electronics development engineer and have been soldering for well over 30 years.

If you are REALLY strapped for cash then fine, go for it. Personally, I wouldn't touch it with yours. Beginners will get horrendous results.
LammyTheLamster

Sounds like me too! Any recommendations?



Here is the one I have been using for the past 20 years for both electronics and general purpose work without issue, I did have to buy a smaller tip than the one supplied for electronics though.

portasol.com/pro…331

Edited by: "Baz8755" 7th Apr 2012
Premier

Yoo could try one of these if you want to solder a really big joint



How things have changed.....When I was a student we certainly didn't solder our joints
I'd rather invest the £4 into a good soldering iron as I do soldering everyday at work it is important to have a good one if you are using it a lot
15 watt Antex iron for electronics work, can't go wrong. This iron is probably ok for soldering electrical wiring but not much else.
Zad

What on earth do you solder? My 2 most used soldering irons are 15W and … What on earth do you solder? My 2 most used soldering irons are 15W and 35W. I'm an electronics development engineer and have been soldering for well over 30 years. If you are REALLY strapped for cash then fine, go for it. Personally, I wouldn't touch it with yours. Beginners will get horrendous results.



Various items, components (caps,resistors, SMD's), soldering tags, pins, 7/32 strand wire.

I've always used a Weller soldering iron so you can change the tips depending on the amount of "beef" and/or delicacy you require for any given job.

I've also got a big beefy 200W iron for those big cable jobs
I need to do one simple job, first in ten years, solder a new power connector unit on my laptops motherboard. Can the techies here suggest a suitable soldering iron and the thickness of flux I need? I presume this one is unsuitable from the comments?
40W? Keep away from this if you're doing intricate electronics, e.g. on PCBs etc. Stick with a 15w type with a really fine point.

Though this is handy for general work, I use a 30w for things like soldering audio connectors onto the leads.

I think 15 to 18 watts is usually recommended for electronics, preferably one with low leakage current to the tip.

35 watt plus would be more suited to automotive wiring.

I like Antex irons with a silicon rubber cable (cost ~£20 if you shop around).

Alternatively maplin do a low cost temperature controlled iron for £19.99 maplin.co.uk/50w…016, my brother picked one up one of the times its been on offer for £10 and it didn't seem too bad when I tried it, although I didn't like the stiffer cable.



Edited by: "melted" 7th Apr 2012
This is one of those strange nothing products that is neither one thing or another.

I have a 15W iron for general duties (Antex -- decent), and a very cheap 60W for soldering wires to chassis, pot shells etc (£2 from ebay).

40W? Too much for one and not enough for the other...
Edited by: "jasejames" 12th Apr 2012
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