Sony Bravia KD55XE7073 4K HDR Smart TV (X-Reality PRO for Enhanced Clarity, Texture and Detail Picture Quality, 2017 Model) - 55 inch, Silver [Energy Class a_plus] [Energy Class A+] - £529 @ Amazon Prime Exclusive
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Sony Bravia KD55XE7073 4K HDR Smart TV (X-Reality PRO for Enhanced Clarity, Texture and Detail Picture Quality, 2017 Model) - 55 inch, Silver [Energy Class a_plus] [Energy Class A+] - £529 @ Amazon Prime Exclusive

50
Found 30th Dec 2017
  • 4K HDR - Immerse yourself in the brilliance of 4K HDRIncredible contrast, real-life colours and exceptional 4K detail. Get closer to reality, even with regular broadcasts and movies.
  • 4K X-Reality PRO - Every detail re-imaginedEvery scene is analysed and improved thanks to an image database that addresses contrast, colour and detail, for a beautifully enhanced picture.
  • Full Smart TV - Smart TV - More than just TVBrowse the web, watch your favourite YouTube clips and enjoy popular apps on the big screen. Dimension of TV without Stand (W x H x D): Approx. 123.8 x 72.2 x 5.8 cm, Dimension of TV with Stand (W x H x D): Approx. 123.8 x 77.5 x 25.2 cm
  • Slim, Stylish Bezel - Hairline Finish StandA slim body and thin black bezel draw your focus into the picture, whilst a silver stand adds to the stylish design. Open baffle speaker. Usb drive format support is fat16, fat32, ntfs
  • HDD Rec - Record your favourite TV showsProgramme your TV to record your favourite show, with the simple connection of a USB hard drive.
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Vixrub1 h, 8 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


It's a bit of a minefield and I'm definitely an enthusiast not an expert.

For HDR you generally want one with HDR10 and HLG support as a bare minimum. The HDR punch depends upon the peak brightness which is measured in candela (cd/m²) so the effect is vastly improved on sets in the 500-1000 range. The backlight and dimming zones also play their part in non-OLED screens.

Most budget sets use a 60Hz panel which affects motion handling, as you move up the range you'll generally see manufacturers switching to native 120Hz.

True 10bit is still a premium feature so you're unlikely to see it on many sets below £1000. 8bit +FRC can do a decent job so it isn't the end of the world. As as side note I'd avoid any LG sets using WRGB as they're not true UHD.

If you're gaming it's worth keeping an eye on the input lag, 30ms or lower is preferable. Fortunately most manufacturers have made big improvements in 2017.

There are dozens of other things to take into consideration so it's very complicated for consumers but you generally get what you pay for. Just try to stick to your budget as there's always new technology round the corner, today's premium TVs will be old hat when the 2018-19 models start implementing new HDMI features.
Vixrub4 h, 9 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


Well, to start with you have to understand how an HDR picture differs.

Most of an HDR picture is the same as an SDR picture. The differences are in the parts that would be extremely bright or extremely rich in colour in real life. Brightly coloured objects, glints off metal, light sources etc.

The extra brightness for these small, bright parts is created by two things. A higher peak brightness but, more critically, the ability to just increase the brightness behind the spot where it's needed. The latter is called the local dimming system and the size of the area it can brighten is generally measured by the total number of such areas on screen - usually called zones.

So a TV like this without a local dimming system (just one zone - the entire screen) can't produce any higher brightness in small areas than any other TV. Because HDR does allow content creators better control of the TV's brightness it does allow a couple of tricks that weren't possible before (like flashing the backlight at maximum for a massive explosion) but it's not going to look any different in most scenes.

Generally you need 20-30 dimming zones before you start seeing benefits in many of scenes, the TVs with fewer can only activate them more rarely because very large, very bright objects are rarer. It's debatable whether TVs like LG's SJ series and Samsung's MU7000+ are any better at that aspect of HDR than competitors without a local dimming system like a Sony XE85.


In terms of colour, that comes from the frequencies of the backlight, and any filter layers between it and the LCD panel (Quantum dots being the most famous). It's generally measured as a percentage of the colours that either the HDR standards allow creators to specify (Rec. 2020) or that a lot of current HDR content is using (DCI-P3). It also also either be measured in the older XY standard or the newer UV standard. Generally the newer ones are defined in more perceptual terms - 90% UV is closer to what we'd perceive as 90% of those shades than 90% XY is. Make sure you compare like with like.

Colour gamut as above is measured at a fixed brightness, there is a push to move to colour volume as the gamut number isn't always reflective of how the TV can reproduce colours at different brightnesses. For example current OLEDs tend to be stronger at low brightness and weaker at high brightness compared to LCDs.

10-bit colour depth comes in here too. It's not responsible for the new colours but instead provides extra shades for them. If HDR had been defined in 8-bit colour the higher brightness range and wider colour gamut would have meant that shades would have been spaced further apart, and there'd be more banding than in SDR.

Some people think they need a 10-bit LCD panel for HDR, but because the local dimming system is handling most of the new brightness range (the LCD panel is limited by it's contrast) the LCD isn't required to reproduce anywhere near 1024 brightness levels per subpixel. Combined with the tiny size of 4K pixels (smaller than a Full HD subpixel) it's questionable whether it's of any advantage at all.


So basically, you need to look at the effectiveness of the local dimming system at boosting contrast, the brightess of the backlight to take advantage of that contrast and the range of colours the TV can reproduce.
50 Comments
The black one is £519!
Edited by: "JPS" 30th Dec 2017
black also available £10 cheaper at £519


edit: beaten to it!
Edited by: "jorg" 30th Dec 2017
are these android tv ?
tom619513 m ago

are these android tv ?


Fraid not
tom619514 m ago

are these android tv ?


No
Are these good?
MBeeching18 m ago

It's alright, nothing special: 60Hz / 350cd/m / 8bit …It's alright, nothing special: 60Hz / 350cd/m / 8bit +FRChttps://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/99cebb5



Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?
Vixrub24 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


Yes if you make sure it's a proper 10bit panel the rest of the specs will match up to make a good TV. Anything below £800 you know it's hasn't a 10bit panel.
Proper 10 bit. And over 1,000 nits or cd/m2 is required to be certified ultra hd. And i, personally prefer over 100hz. But if you're not too fussy and more cost conscious i'd say 8bits +2 to get 10 bit when the source is right is perfectly ok. And anything over 5 or 600 nits. Hth. If cost not a problem, then what clipsan says^^
Edited by: "TPBowler1" 30th Dec 2017
OK looking for 65" 10 bit in jan sales, got to be below £1000. any ideas what to keep an eye on that may go down in jan, as new tv come into stock. prefer Panasonic, sony, not so keen on Samsung, also want a long guarantee, like john lewis 5 years, or richer sounds 6 years. ideas welcome, thanks.
apple211 m ago

OK looking for 65" 10 bit in jan sales, got to be below £1000. any ideas …OK looking for 65" 10 bit in jan sales, got to be below £1000. any ideas what to keep an eye on that may go down in jan, as new tv come into stock. prefer Panasonic, sony, not so keen on Samsung, also want a long guarantee, like john lewis 5 years, or richer sounds 6 years. ideas welcome, thanks.


Good luck! Hard pressed to get a proper 10 bit for that much from Sony
I've noticed many people seem to be buying a lot of these 4k tv's effectively as gaming monitors. I'm the opposite, basically want good Freeview and/or Freesat HD/SD at 55 inch with 1080 bluesy and maybe occasional 4k as I develop capability. Basically buying a Tv to be a Tv! :-) A lot of these seem to fall down on upscaling TV sources, any recommendations?
BlackCloud14 m ago

I've noticed many people seem to be buying a lot of these 4k tv's …I've noticed many people seem to be buying a lot of these 4k tv's effectively as gaming monitors. I'm the opposite, basically want good Freeview and/or Freesat HD/SD at 55 inch with 1080 bluesy and maybe occasional 4k as I develop capability. Basically buying a Tv to be a Tv! :-) A lot of these seem to fall down on upscaling TV sources, any recommendations?


4k TV as a montior is just plain stupid. Input lag is far too great.
Vixrub1 h, 8 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


It's a bit of a minefield and I'm definitely an enthusiast not an expert.

For HDR you generally want one with HDR10 and HLG support as a bare minimum. The HDR punch depends upon the peak brightness which is measured in candela (cd/m²) so the effect is vastly improved on sets in the 500-1000 range. The backlight and dimming zones also play their part in non-OLED screens.

Most budget sets use a 60Hz panel which affects motion handling, as you move up the range you'll generally see manufacturers switching to native 120Hz.

True 10bit is still a premium feature so you're unlikely to see it on many sets below £1000. 8bit +FRC can do a decent job so it isn't the end of the world. As as side note I'd avoid any LG sets using WRGB as they're not true UHD.

If you're gaming it's worth keeping an eye on the input lag, 30ms or lower is preferable. Fortunately most manufacturers have made big improvements in 2017.

There are dozens of other things to take into consideration so it's very complicated for consumers but you generally get what you pay for. Just try to stick to your budget as there's always new technology round the corner, today's premium TVs will be old hat when the 2018-19 models start implementing new HDMI features.
BlackCloud29 m ago

I've noticed many people seem to be buying a lot of these 4k tv's …I've noticed many people seem to be buying a lot of these 4k tv's effectively as gaming monitors. I'm the opposite, basically want good Freeview and/or Freesat HD/SD at 55 inch with 1080 bluesy and maybe occasional 4k as I develop capability. Basically buying a Tv to be a Tv! :-) A lot of these seem to fall down on upscaling TV sources, any recommendations?



I'm also looking for a TV primarily for freeview TV so 1080p and SD sources. So thought I'd just get a decent 1080 TV. But there hard to come by. I've looked on eBay and gumtree but the prices seem rediculous compared to buying a new 4k TV with 5 or so years warranty.
stec776 m ago

I'm also looking for a TV primarily for freeview TV so 1080p and SD …I'm also looking for a TV primarily for freeview TV so 1080p and SD sources. So thought I'd just get a decent 1080 TV. But there hard to come by. I've looked on eBay and gumtree but the prices seem rediculous compared to buying a new 4k TV with 5 or so years warranty.


There are some decent 1080P tv's still made but I noticed with Sony all their 1080P TV's now only seem to have 2 HDMI ports and I'd prefer 3 or 4 which seems to force you to their 4K models. I guess we have to accept that going forward 4K will be the standard whether you need it or not. As long as SD and HD looks ok on a 4K then hopefully it won't matter.

Anyway this deal looks very good to me.
Edited by: "spannerzone" 30th Dec 2017
Vixrub1 h, 36 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


HZ, in this instance, is not panel refresh rate, but motion rate. Often gives a soap opera effect, and is usually entirely irrelevant.

What you want to look at, generally, is contrast (not dynamic - use reviews to find the contrast ratio), max brightness, 10 Bit colour depth and then which smart features you want.

AVForums is good for finding reviews on stuff.
Edited by: "Cameron583" 30th Dec 2017
Cameron58315 m ago

HZ, in this instance, is not panel refresh rate, but motion rate. Often …HZ, in this instance, is not panel refresh rate, but motion rate. Often gives a soap opera effect, and is usually entirely irrelevant. What you want to look at, generally, is contrast (not dynamic - use reviews to find the contrast ratio), max brightness, 10 Bit colour depth and then which smart features you want. AVForums is good for finding reviews on stuff.


It’s actually quite hard to find the native refresh rate on a lot of TVs because they’ll happily publish their 1600hz motion processing but unsurprisingly not the 60hz panel refresh rate.
gerardarmstrong552 m ago

4k TV as a montior is just plain stupid. Input lag is far too great.


What I meant was, if you read a lot of the comments in 4k tv threads, many people seem to suggest they will be plugging in consoles and bluray/4k rather than using terrestrial tv. Terrestrial tv sources seems to be what many of these 4k tv's fall down on, upscaling being more optimised for a 4k picture.
Minstadave21 m ago

It’s actually quite hard to find the native refresh rate on a lot of TVs b …It’s actually quite hard to find the native refresh rate on a lot of TVs because they’ll happily publish their 1600hz motion processing but unsurprisingly not the 60hz panel refresh rate.


As a general rule of thumb:

3D will be 120 Hz
Non 3D 60 Hz
Cameron58321 m ago

As a general rule of thumb:3D will be 120 HzNon 3D 60 Hz


3D is dead - Don’t think any manufacturers are still selling 3D sets.
Edited by: "Minstadave" 30th Dec 2017
Thanks for advice

I’ve got a Panasonic Viera TX-L42ET60B 42-inch just not sure if it’s worth upgrading to something like this or waiting and saving some more money
Minstadave30 m ago

3D is dead - Don’t think any manufacturers are still selling 3D sets.


In which case safe to assume all are 60 Hz

Panasonic are the only big manufacturer to bring a 3D TV to market in 2017
pop80_uk3 m ago

Thanks for adviceI’ve got a Panasonic Viera TX-L42ET60B 42-inch just not s …Thanks for adviceI’ve got a Panasonic Viera TX-L42ET60B 42-inch just not sure if it’s worth upgrading to something like this or waiting and saving some more money


If it does the job for now, wait a year or two for higher end tech to trickle down into mid range/budget TVs. Just like what happened with FHD TVs.
Vixrub4 h, 9 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


Well, to start with you have to understand how an HDR picture differs.

Most of an HDR picture is the same as an SDR picture. The differences are in the parts that would be extremely bright or extremely rich in colour in real life. Brightly coloured objects, glints off metal, light sources etc.

The extra brightness for these small, bright parts is created by two things. A higher peak brightness but, more critically, the ability to just increase the brightness behind the spot where it's needed. The latter is called the local dimming system and the size of the area it can brighten is generally measured by the total number of such areas on screen - usually called zones.

So a TV like this without a local dimming system (just one zone - the entire screen) can't produce any higher brightness in small areas than any other TV. Because HDR does allow content creators better control of the TV's brightness it does allow a couple of tricks that weren't possible before (like flashing the backlight at maximum for a massive explosion) but it's not going to look any different in most scenes.

Generally you need 20-30 dimming zones before you start seeing benefits in many of scenes, the TVs with fewer can only activate them more rarely because very large, very bright objects are rarer. It's debatable whether TVs like LG's SJ series and Samsung's MU7000+ are any better at that aspect of HDR than competitors without a local dimming system like a Sony XE85.


In terms of colour, that comes from the frequencies of the backlight, and any filter layers between it and the LCD panel (Quantum dots being the most famous). It's generally measured as a percentage of the colours that either the HDR standards allow creators to specify (Rec. 2020) or that a lot of current HDR content is using (DCI-P3). It also also either be measured in the older XY standard or the newer UV standard. Generally the newer ones are defined in more perceptual terms - 90% UV is closer to what we'd perceive as 90% of those shades than 90% XY is. Make sure you compare like with like.

Colour gamut as above is measured at a fixed brightness, there is a push to move to colour volume as the gamut number isn't always reflective of how the TV can reproduce colours at different brightnesses. For example current OLEDs tend to be stronger at low brightness and weaker at high brightness compared to LCDs.

10-bit colour depth comes in here too. It's not responsible for the new colours but instead provides extra shades for them. If HDR had been defined in 8-bit colour the higher brightness range and wider colour gamut would have meant that shades would have been spaced further apart, and there'd be more banding than in SDR.

Some people think they need a 10-bit LCD panel for HDR, but because the local dimming system is handling most of the new brightness range (the LCD panel is limited by it's contrast) the LCD isn't required to reproduce anywhere near 1024 brightness levels per subpixel. Combined with the tiny size of 4K pixels (smaller than a Full HD subpixel) it's questionable whether it's of any advantage at all.


So basically, you need to look at the effectiveness of the local dimming system at boosting contrast, the brightess of the backlight to take advantage of that contrast and the range of colours the TV can reproduce.
Thanks for taking the time to help people with that explanation. Appreciated.
yes avforums is good try s21.com for reviews as well
MBeeching7 h, 6 m ago

It's a bit of a minefield and I'm definitely an enthusiast not an …It's a bit of a minefield and I'm definitely an enthusiast not an expert.For HDR you generally want one with HDR10 and HLG support as a bare minimum. The HDR punch depends upon the peak brightness which is measured in candela (cd/m²) so the effect is vastly improved on sets in the 500-1000 range. The backlight and dimming zones also play their part in non-OLED screens.Most budget sets use a 60Hz panel which affects motion handling, as you move up the range you'll generally see manufacturers switching to native 120Hz.True 10bit is still a premium feature so you're unlikely to see it on many sets below £1000. 8bit +FRC can do a decent job so it isn't the end of the world. As as side note I'd avoid any LG sets using WRGB as they're not true UHD.If you're gaming it's worth keeping an eye on the input lag, 30ms or lower is preferable. Fortunately most manufacturers have made big improvements in 2017.There are dozens of other things to take into consideration so it's very complicated for consumers but you generally get what you pay for. Just try to stick to your budget as there's always new technology round the corner, today's premium TVs will be old hat when the 2018-19 models start implementing new HDMI features.


Looking at current 4K TVs in showrooms seems to be a minefield at the minute. People see this one next to the, well reviewed, Sony 55XE9005 and wonder why the “headline specs” (4K, HDR etc.) look pretty identical - but the XE90 version is more than twice as much!!

The retailers are not getting bogged down trying to explain about 10-bit panels and the like
Edited by: "BrianM" 30th Dec 2017
A lot of people buying Sony and Samsung and I’m pretty sure none of them support HLG (hybrid log gamma) so you can’t even watch 4K streams from BBC iPlayer in 4K. Currently only Panasonic & LG owners can watch Blue Planet UHD on iplayer
se237 m ago

A lot of people buying Sony and Samsung and I’m pretty sure none of them s …A lot of people buying Sony and Samsung and I’m pretty sure none of them support HLG (hybrid log gamma) so you can’t even watch 4K streams from BBC iPlayer in 4K. Currently only Panasonic & LG owners can watch Blue Planet UHD on iplayer


There are quite a few Sony models in the iPlayer “Blue Planet II HDR test” approved list - but by no means all! I find that strange as I thought all (most?) the recent Android TV based models got HLG in the latest update (but I must be mistaken??)

In any event it might be very silly to choose a TV solely on the basis of a soon-to-finish test broadcast!
Edited by: "BrianM" 30th Dec 2017
Hi guys,

This is now 629..
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se2351 m ago

A lot of people buying Sony and Samsung and I’m pretty sure none of them s …A lot of people buying Sony and Samsung and I’m pretty sure none of them support HLG (hybrid log gamma) so you can’t even watch 4K streams from BBC iPlayer in 4K. Currently only Panasonic & LG owners can watch Blue Planet UHD on iplayer


It has HDR10 and HLG. I own this TV and it's pretty stunning and one of Sony's best lower end TVs ever made. I paid 549 for it on Black Friday.
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gerardarmstrong58 h, 7 m ago

4k TV as a montior is just plain stupid. Input lag is far too great.


Input lag is under 20ms in Game 'scene select' mode on these non Android Sonys.
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spannerzone7 h, 50 m ago

There are some decent 1080P tv's still made but I noticed with Sony all …There are some decent 1080P tv's still made but I noticed with Sony all their 1080P TV's now only seem to have 2 HDMI ports and I'd prefer 3 or 4 which seems to force you to their 4K models. I guess we have to accept that going forward 4K will be the standard whether you need it or not. As long as SD and HD looks ok on a 4K then hopefully it won't matter.Anyway this deal looks very good to me.


SD looks no worse than on a Full HD TV on these Sonys. They have class leading upscaling in X-Reality PRO. Just try a Hollywood DVD in these TVs and you'll be amazed! The WE7 is also a great TV made of metal too but you can solve the 2HDMI issue on the WE7 by buying a self powering HDMI splitter that auto switches between sources and comes on and off with the TV. Betron I believe is the brand that makes a self powering one for about £7.
tom619510 h, 54 m ago

are these android tv ?


Yes they are I have one and that’s the operating system they run on
Clipsan9 h, 9 m ago

Yes if you make sure it's a proper 10bit panel the rest of the specs will …Yes if you make sure it's a proper 10bit panel the rest of the specs will match up to make a good TV. Anything below £800 you know it's hasn't a 10bit panel.


Apart from the UE55MU7000, which has been £699 a couple of times... also 120Hz. Still trying to convince myself I need to upgrade from a perfectly functional 49 inch non 4k Sammy.
What is the LG 55UJ670V like for £579 , its a mind field
Vixrub11 h, 19 m ago

Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when …Still trying to get my head around what specs to keep an eye out for when it comes to 4K HDR TVs. What should you be looking for when it comes to specs for a good one? 1000Hz, 10bit?


It always depends what you're after. The people who want the best of the best tend to go with OLEDs. As a minimum as other people stated, First of all making sure it supports HDR10 & HLG is typically considered a good starting point. You also have the Ultra HD premium certified (something along them lines) TVs that are compliant with the minimum specs to be considered HDR. Then after that you can talk about Dolby Vision which is dynamic metadata, which helps adjust the TV frame-by-frame, but HDR 10+ is a solution developed by Samsung that does the same thing. Advanced HDR is another, but not really necessary. Dimming zones are another as other people stated. Rtings is a good website to look on... A full array local dimming LCD tend to be the best, as long as the dimming zones are adequate. The top end sony TVs have 50/100+, while others may have like 10 which isn't as good. OLED on the other hand doesn't have Local dimming as the TVs don't have a backlight. By end of 2018, we should have a good concise answer on what technology is actually necessary etc. As rn there's a lot of new things being developed in terms of HDR ...
i have this tv, for the money, its cracking. its not a android TV unfortunately so no kodi install. picture is vivid and looks nice inUHD. only issue i have since the update is the iplayer fails occasionally. its also good for gaming, i use a PS4 pro and have not recognised any lag, not that i'd probably notice it. worth while for a budget 4k 'good' brand TV
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