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Spear & Jackson S80RO Rotavator (800W) - £66.66 @ Argos (Free C&C)
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Spear & Jackson S80RO Rotavator (800W) - £66.66 @ Argos (Free C&C)

£66.66£75.9912%Argos Deals
11
Posted 11th Jul

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3 Yr warranty.

Break up, churn and aerate your soil with minimal effort with this garden rotavator and tiller. Easily cover large areas to help prepare your garden for a host of improvement jobs. It's ideal for flower beds, landscaping and vegetable patches and the 4 rust-proof blades (tines) can till up to a depth of 18cm. Combine this with a working width of 36cm, it's capable of preparing a large area for planting in a short period of time with minimal effort.
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11 Comments
Can this be used for leveling out too
princessnataliefariss11/07/2019 20:47

Can this be used for leveling out too


Yea it can, I used one to loosen up my soil, turn it over and break it up before spreading the soil out to level the garden. It was an easy job that took me a few hours.
It's obviously corded so I'd put the cable over a washing line (if possible) and defo use a circuit breaker
Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with (what seems to be) lots of bush-roots?
Edited by: "Savaholic" 11th Jul
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deleted361726
Savaholic11/07/2019 22:39

Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with …Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with (what seems to be) lots of bush-roots?



Savaholic11/07/2019 22:39

Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with …Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with (what seems to be) lots of bush-roots?



Hmmm -I wouldn't be overly optimistic, which is a polite way of saying probably not!

Let nature help you (but it isn't quick)

Use a digging fork to break up hard compacted soil - not to a fine tilth, but just to get the air in it, and wait until the autumn when there's a bit more moisture in the ground.

Throw lots of compost/ fibre around before it gets chilly and hopefully the worms will drag it into the topsoil, then after the frost has had a chance to break up the "lumps" the soil should be open enough to let a modestly powered 800w motor do the final prep.

If you just go at concrete hard ground, which is held together by weed roots, I'd give it about half an hour before the motor overheated or worse. Why not hire yourself an "industrial" machine with a petrol engine for an afternoon?

I might be entirely wrong though, and would be happy to stand corrected.
Savaholic11/07/2019 22:39

Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with …Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with (what seems to be) lots of bush-roots?


Yes used it on my garden with no problems
deleted36172612/07/2019 00:27

Hmmm -I wouldn't be overly optimistic, which is a polite way of saying …Hmmm -I wouldn't be overly optimistic, which is a polite way of saying probably not!Let nature help you (but it isn't quick)Use a digging fork to break up hard compacted soil - not to a fine tilth, but just to get the air in it, and wait until the autumn when there's a bit more moisture in the ground.Throw lots of compost/ fibre around before it gets chilly and hopefully the worms will drag it into the topsoil, then after the frost has had a chance to break up the "lumps" the soil should be open enough to let a modestly powered 800w motor do the final prep.If you just go at concrete hard ground, which is held together by weed roots, I'd give it about half an hour before the motor overheated or worse. Why not hire yourself an "industrial" machine with a petrol engine for an afternoon?I might be entirely wrong though, and would be happy to stand corrected.


Thx advice appreciated.
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deleted1169072
Savaholic11/07/2019 22:39

Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with …Garden-newbie question: Would this be able to churn up hard soil with (what seems to be) lots of bush-roots?



No. These really are for pre-conditioned soil. I have used a friends Mantis version which is superior to this and you really must break up the soil by digging it over first. As UKHOTDEALS1 say, get yourself a petrol one from a local hire place if you have really compacted soil.
I would also bet that even these "Semi-Professional" ones will struggle with soft flexible roots. I used the Camon C8 8 HP unit on a 4 metre by 30 metre rear garden before turfing a few years ago and I would not have done the job without it.
Edited by: "deleted1169072" 13th Jul
deleted36172612/07/2019 00:27

Hmmm -I wouldn't be overly optimistic, which is a polite way of saying …Hmmm -I wouldn't be overly optimistic, which is a polite way of saying probably not!Let nature help you (but it isn't quick)Use a digging fork to break up hard compacted soil - not to a fine tilth, but just to get the air in it, and wait until the autumn when there's a bit more moisture in the ground.Throw lots of compost/ fibre around before it gets chilly and hopefully the worms will drag it into the topsoil, then after the frost has had a chance to break up the "lumps" the soil should be open enough to let a modestly powered 800w motor do the final prep.If you just go at concrete hard ground, which is held together by weed roots, I'd give it about half an hour before the motor overheated or worse. Why not hire yourself an "industrial" machine with a petrol engine for an afternoon?I might be entirely wrong though, and would be happy to stand corrected.


Yep agree, most rotavators will need the soil forking over in my experience or spading.
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